HomeRoast Digest


Topic: moka pot brew tips (10 msgs / 172 lines)
1) From: Jonathan Morris
I just bought the 6 tasse Bialetti and am wondering if anyone has any tips for brewing.  One question is about brew time.  On SM's brew tip sheet it says brewing should take about 5 minutes.  Does this time begin from the moment you put it on the stove or from the first evidence of brewing (coffee in top)?  I hope it's the latter because the whole process took me 20 minutes.  Thanks in advance.
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2) From: James House
It's been a few months since I have used a Moka Pot, but I used to use them
all the time.  Time largely depends on how quickly you heat em up.  The last
one I used was on an electric stove and it took maybe 10-12 minutes start to
finish.  So yeah, the 5 minute should be the time the actual brewing starts,
not including the time to heat the water.
On 6/14/06, Jonathan Morris  wrote:
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3) From: Scott Miller
Jonathan Morris wrote:
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Jonathan,
I have the 6 cup Bialetti also and have never actually timed the 
process. I just add water, load the basket, screw on the top, apply 
heat... wait for the gurgling sound to indicate things are done and pour 
my cups.
I use 11 ounces of water and a grind that is finer than drip, not as 
fine as espresso. I don't weigh the beans, but use volume (fill the 
basket to just overflowing) as my guide. I use an electric stove on 
medium high heat. Basically, what I try to do is make the grind the 
single variable I adjust.
Here's the visual guide I used in addition to the SM tip sheet:
cheers,
ScoTTT

4) From: Elliott Perkins
Hi Jonathan,
I use a 6 tasse Bialetti twice a day.  I used to preheat the water in a 
microwave, but I have stopped since we got rid of our microwave.  I 
can't taste any difference from that change, but it does take longer on 
the stove, obviously.
I think five minutes from the time coffee appears is about right, maybe 
a bit short.
I have to brew with the lid open, otherwise the coffee boils before it 
is done brewing.
Regards,
Elliott
Scott Miller wrote:
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5) From: Woody DeCasere
only thing i will add to this is keep the heat low, it will take longer but
you dont risk the boiling in the top pot which will ruin the coffee.
On 6/16/06, Elliott Perkins  wrote:
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-- 
"Good night, and Good Coffee"

6) From: Ed Needham
Actually, about the worst thing that happens with a moka pot to harm the 
flavor is to let the last remaining bit of liquid shoot through with the 
steam, which is way hotter than the proper extraction temperature.  I try to 
pull it off the stove before it 'shoots through', and immediately pour it 
into my serving cup.  Low heat helps.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

7) From: Michael Wascher
We visited my wife's Italian cousins years ago. When they made moka they
moved the pot on & off of the flame. On the flame at the beginning to get
the water up to temp rapidly. After it started to flow the flame got turned
down & the pot was moved off the flame, position adjusted so the coffee just
barely flowed.
I pulled my moka pot out of the closet when we got home. Keeping the coffee
flow as low as possible seems to be the key to good results.
On 6/17/06, Woody DeCasere  wrote:
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-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce

8) From: Scott Miller
Michael Wascher wrote:
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Alright! A new way to fiddle with my coffee; thanks Micael, I'll give 
this a try with a brew this afternoon.
cheers,
ScoTTT

9) From: Maureen Azcoitia
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if anyone has >> any  tips for brewing.  One question
is about brew time.  On SM's >> brew tip sheet it says
brewing should take about 5 minutes.  Does >> this
time begin from the moment you put it on the stove or
from >> the first evidence of brewing (coffee in top)?
 I hope it's the latter >> because the whole process
took me 20 minutes.  Thanks in 
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actually timed the 
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the top, apply 
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things are done and 
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than drip, not as 
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volume (fill the 
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electric stove on 
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make the grind the 
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tip sheet:
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FYI - the link you provided is also how we make cuban
coffee (cafe cubano).  my husband drinks a whole pot
(4 cups) every morning but doesn't use the sugar.  we
usually just do the "sugar step" when we have company.

10) From: Elliott Perkins
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Oh heck, you got me.  I watch it like a hawk, and when what is coming 
out looks like crema, hopefully about two thirds of the way up the 
shaft, I turn off the heat, and let the latent heat in the stove burner 
and whatever pressure is in the pot push the rest through.
I was holding it high and low over the flame, but I couldn't hold it 
level enough, then I was stopping and restarting the flame, but the 
click-click-click of the stove's electric ignition was driving my wife 
batty.  Now I just watch it until it looks like its about to start 
shooting steam, which is completely OC on my part, and turn it off.
Elliott
Michael Wascher wrote:
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