HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT - BBQ (10 msgs / 216 lines)
1) From: Mike Chester
<Snip>
I have a friend whose idea of BBQ is to cover anything with sauce.  However, 
he does not like it when that pesky smoke flavor interferes with the taste 
of the sauce.  He also gets his "cappuccino" from a vending machine at the 
gas station.
Mike

2) From: Bigskullhead1
BBQ is all in the marinade & the smoke. That is some kickin  BBQ!!!!!!   
johnnyb

3) From: mmore
It's dry rub first - let it sit overnight.  Then a nice, slow cook allowing the fats to permeate through the meat....
 
I'M GETTING HUNGRY!!!!
 
I've also seen several barbeque sauce (dippin' sauce) recipies that call for STRONG COFFEE.  I tried one and it was kick butt!

4) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hidden in your reply is the true definition of barbeque: "slow cooked."  =
 It is the long times and low temperature cooking over fire or coals =
that make BBQ what it is.  All the rest is just condiments and =
froo-froo.  
Dan
  It's dry rub first - let it sit overnight.  Then a nice, slow cook =
allowing the fats to permeate through the meat....
  I'M GETTING HUNGRY!!!!
  I've also seen several barbeque sauce (dippin' sauce) recipies that =
call for STRONG COFFEE.  I tried one and it was kick butt!

5) From: Aaron
I generally like to smoke my foods.  I use a dry rub or a home made 
marinaite.  Dry rub tends to be my preference though.
Depending on the type of meat, Ill smoke it over a hickory/mesquite  or 
a maple/cherry wood fire for a good many hours and Hmmmm...
One of my favorites is getting a big ole ham.  I glaze it while cooking 
with a sauce made up of  Honey right off the beehive, home made mustard, 
and a touch of garlic and just a wee bit of carribean jerk seasoning in 
it.  Ill throw this on an indirect  maple/cherry fire  and let er go.   
It takes several hours but wow, especially the next day after I have cut 
off all the meat from the bone and let it 'set' to get the flavors fully 
infused into it....  can't beat home cooking.
I better shut up now before I get too hungry.
Aaron

6) From: Mark A. Chalkley
I love smoking meat as much as I love drinking coffee.  Since this OT subject
came up, and I got bit BIG-TIME by something a couple weeks ago, I'm going to
offer a little rant, in the hopes that my fellow listers who also bbq won't have
the same problem.
I have a favorite rub that I've been using for quite a while now (which includes
coffee as one of its main ingredients, of course).  Pretty much everyone who's
sampled it likes it, and a lot of my friends use it as an all-purpose seasoning
on the table.
Anyway, I smoked some ribs a couple weeks ago and I, as well as some of my
friends whose taste buds I trust, thought they were too salty.  At first I
thought I had botched my rub recipe, but I subsequently found out that my
grocery store had started carrying ribs that are pre-injected with a 12% sodium
solution!  Every piece of pork they carry now, except butts, is pre-injected.
So, now I have to make a separate rub with no salt for ribs.  Or find another
source of meat.  I HATE it when that happens...
FWIW, properly rubbed and smoked meat don't need no stinkin' sauce.  And if you
don't like smoke flavor, don't smoke it.  That's my story and I'm sticking to
it.
Mark C.
On Thursday, June 15, 2006, 9:49:29 AM, Mike Chester wrote:
<Snip>
MC> I have a friend whose idea of BBQ is to cover anything with sauce.  However, 
MC> he does not like it when that pesky smoke flavor interferes with the taste 
MC> of the sauce.  He also gets his "cappuccino" from a vending machine at the 
MC> gas station.
MC> Mike
MC>
MC> homeroast mailing list
MC>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastMC> To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
MC> unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

7) From: Aaron
Unfortunately you will find that a lot lately.  They are injecting 
saltwater into a lot of stuff they sell you.  sometimes up to as much as 
30 to 40% of it is injected saltwater.   This is really a shitty deal 
(pardon my french) when you consider that some meats you are paying 3 to 
4 dollars a pound if not more....... for #$%$% salt water...  As you 
have found out, pork, especially ham is notorious for this tactic.  They 
call it a preservative.
Check the label of any meat you are buying, especially pork, to see how 
much is 'injected solution'.  Before you buy it.  With this, you do not 
need to add any more salt and should aim to buy the ones that dont have 
that much squirted into them.
One thing I have done before with porkchops,  I soak them in cold water 
for about 5 minutes, swish them around.... I find that this removes a 
LOT of the salt and garbage they may have put into them, take them out, 
pat them dry with a paper towel then rub them and let em sit a bit 
before cooking.  I have not noticed any degradation of the flavor of the 
meat...
I have a rub I made that uses 21 different spices, and I have all but 
eliminated salt from it.  Trust me it took some doing to get the taste 
right because salt is a good balancing flavor but I did manage.  It has 
a tiny bit but not much at all.  Instead of salt, try a touch of lemon 
peel, or powdered lemon if you can get it, and a hint of nutmeg... (be 
careful you don't get lemon salt)....
have fun
aaron

8) From: Pat Murray
Aren't you gonna share your rub recipe with us?

9) From: javafool
These are not salt free, but The Dizzy Pig rubs are quite good.http://www.dizzypigbbq.com/HTMLrubs/dizzydust.htmlTerry

10) From: Mark A. Chalkley
Sure, under two conditions:  One, that anyone who wants it e-mails me directly
for it, so I don't have to post it publicly, and two, that anyone who asks for
it and actually makes it critiques it for me.  I'd appreciate hearing what folks
with more "educated" palates than normal think of it and any suggestions they
might have for its improvement.
Mark C.
On Friday, June 16, 2006, 4:57:50 PM, Pat Murray wrote:
PM> Aren't you gonna share your rub recipe with us?
PM>


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