HomeRoast Digest


Topic: A very basic question about acidity and roast profiles (4 msgs / 114 lines)
1) From: Jeffrey Pawlan
I read your posting to the SM list with interest because I intend to conduct
controlled experiments to correlate flavor and characteristics of brewed coffee
to the segments of the roasting profile.
But I was shocked to see that HW has a default segment in their IR2 that causes
the beans to "dry" at 350F.  This is contrary to all research and to the
knowledge of professional roasters who know that the drying should occur below
the "roast" segment which is from approximately a start of 260-285 to an end at
385. What is occurring in the IR2 profile is an insufficient drying before
beginning the roast and instead going directly to the near the endpoint of the
roast, (intentionally pre first crack).
I will include this IR2 profile among those I test in the experiment later this
year so tasters can report the results.
Jeffrey Pawlan

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
Jeffrey, I whole heartedly agree with your assessment of the I-Roast
mandatory first stage profile.  I am so glad I didn't buy one when they
first came out like I almost did. If I had it'd be 100% dual independent
heater/fan controlled with the built in control interface totally by-passed,
very poor control and lack of control design IMO. P1 much cheaper air
roaster for same or better result!
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Pacific Northwest Gathering IVhttp://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://home.comcast.net/~mdmint/pnwgIV.htmURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>

3) From: Michael Dhabolt
On 6/16/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
Plus a reasonable yield if your not into doing 'micro' roasts.
Mike (just plain)

4) From: Vicki Smith
Thanks, everyone, for the wonderful responses to my question. I learned 
a whole lot.
At this point, I have roasted about 30 times with my iRoast-2. I started 
with the eight half pound samples that came with it from SM and have 
since purchased enough coffee so my husband is beginning to think that 
we could open a shop.
My first coffee buying decision was to buy a whole lot of one kind of 
bean that sounded interesting, and then to play with my new machine, and 
my fairly elementary knowledge, and see what would come from it.
The bean I chose was the Horse Lot 19. I ordered 10 pounds of it and I 
am going through it in a sorta methodical way, using one profile that I 
felt was long enough so that I could try various things with it. So far, 
so good.
This morning, I am drinking some very good Horse, roasted to what I 
would call Full City/Full City Plus, and rested for 4 days. I am trying 
different roasts all along the time line, from 1 day of rest through 
seven. I'm looking forward to seeing what Day 5 will bring.
For this, urmmm, cycle, I stopped the roast with 45 seconds left of the 
11 minute profile. Because Horse roasts unevenly, I ended up with about 
5% of the beans that looked dark enough that I expected them to have oil 
on them, but they didn't, 90% nice evenly roasted darkish, but not dark, 
beans, and about 5% noticeably lighter ones. In my 130 gram batch, I 
tossed out about a half dozen beans that never really roasted much at 
all. This is noticeably different from what I saw during the last 
"cycle" when I stopped the roast 30 seconds earlier.
I know that as people answered my post, there was a fair amount of 
criticism of the machine itself--related to the 350 degree 
pre-programmed start. I bought this machine because it was affordable 
and the venting system made it practical for indoor roasting. Roasting 
outdoors just can't happen here about six months a year.
I've had 30+ years of buying appliances that aren't exactly top of the 
line, and learning to work around their limitations. This roaster seems 
to be much the same. I know that I am seeing a definite relationship 
between changes of the variables that are under my control and the end 
results. For now, that is enough for me to feel good about the machine.
If we win the lottery, I'll get one of those neato sample roasters and 
have an appropriate exhaust system installed in the house. But until 
that happens, I'm betting that by learning as I go, I can nudge some 
very fine coffee out of the iRoast-2 and my KMB pot.
Did I mention that I am loving' the cup I am drinking now?
vicki


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