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Topic: roasting Ethiopian coffees (40 lines)
1) From: Jeffrey Pawlan
Like several on this list, I have found that Ethiopian beans are quite variable
one lot to the next. It seems more so than other origins. So some of the
Ethiopian green beans I have purchased turned out to be so-so, some are
moderately good, and some have turned out to be spectacular.
The choice of single vs double roasting:
It seems that not all green beans lend themselves to double roasting. Ethiopians
generally, but not always, do very well. The ones that have intense flavor and
are bright when single roasted are, in my personal opinion, made even better by
double roasting. Especially when used for espresso. Double roasting must be done
carefully to not allow either baking nor cause the beans to be over-roasted. I
never roast even remotely close to Starbucks or Peets even when I double roast.
I also never ever see oil on my beans unless for some reason I don't use them
up and they sit for two weeks. Whether I do a single roast or a double roast, I
always take it into second crack for 15-45 seconds. That is my own preference
because again I am making espressos.
Single roasting is going to give you far more brightness and acid regardless of
the darkness. So if you prefer those characteristics, then don't double roast.
On the other hand, If you want to mellow out a very bright coffee to make a more
balanced espresso, then double roasting will do it.
   Another example of a good double roast that I have not done in quite some
time:  ISH (Island of St Helena). I single roasted a couple of different ISH
estates and found them to be, well...... disappointing.... and wondered what
all the hoopla was. Another local coffee person came over and I double roasted
a small amount.  We were absolutely shocked at the difference. It was like a
different coffee, now with layers of flavors and a real balance of acid, fruit,
and body.
Jeffrey Pawlan


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