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Topic: Threads on giant Trosser (10 msgs / 229 lines)
1) From: Brian Kamnetz
Just wanted to say thanks for the people who helped me. I reported to
the list that on my giant Trosser, the threads were a little beat up
on the shaft that the handle screws on to. I picked up a 3-sided file
and this morning finally had a change to dress the threads. I filed a
little and tried the handle, and it didn't want to go on. I did that a
couple more times and the handle screwed on smoothly, without
resistance. So, thanks, Mike (just plain) and others, for the advice.
To others like me, remember that you have a great resource here on the
list, in knowledge and helpful people who are willing to share it with
you, that will allow you to tackle many tasks with reduced risk of
making the problem worse rather than fixing it.
Another request for advice: I didn't want the handle to seize on the
threads, so I backed it off so that I could put some lubricant on the
threads. The only thing I had at home is Vaseline, so I used that.
Question 1: Is that a good idea?
Question 2: What sort of lubricant (in addition to penetrating oil
such as WD-40) is good to have around for usual household needs? Is
3-in-1 oil sufficient for most things?
Thanks again,
Brian

2) From: Michael Wascher
I usually use silicon paste. Check with a dive shop, they'll have some for
use on SCUBA regulators & threads. Anyplace that sells compressed gases will
have it, but the stuff from a dive shop will  be safe for use around
consumables.
Just be careful not to get it where you don't want it. Silicon is almost
impossible to get rid of.
On 6/17/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce

3) From: Dan Bollinger
Vaseline if fine.  The threads are coarse enough and tolerance loose enough, 
that it will be easy to remove the handle later.   Dan
<Snip>

4) From: Michael Dhabolt
Brian,
Sounds like you have it 'well in hand'.
Mike (just plain)

5) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 6/17/06, Michael Wascher  wrote:
<Snip>
That reminds me, for some reason, that I have a small plastic tube of
graphite powder somewhere. (The switch was stuck in the dome light of
my truck. I thought I might have to try to change it out, which would
be a major challenge for me. A guy at a hardware store suggested the
graphite powder - worked like a charm!) Is there a graphite option
here too?
Brian

6) From: jim gundlach
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On Jun 17, 2006, at 12:27 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>
Think of WD-40 as a cleaner rather than a lubricant.  A lubricant  
should protect metal from wear when it rubs and rust.  WD-40 is what  
you use to free up metal parts that should move past each other but  
won't because they rusted together.
     Jim Gundlach
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On Jun 17, 2006, =
at 12:27 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:

What sort of lubricant (in = addition to penetrating oil

such as WD-40) is good to have around for usual household = needs? 

= Think of WD-40 as a cleaner rather than a lubricant.  A = lubricant should protect metal from wear when it rubs and rust.  WD-40 = is what you use to free up metal parts that should move past each other = but won't because they rusted together.     Jim = Gundlach = --Apple-Mail-1-476208490--

7) From: Michael Wascher
Pure graphite should be fine, it's just carbon. The char on a steak or
burger sure tastes good, so a bit of graphite powder shouldn't hurt a thing.
I'd steer clear of the stuff that has graphite in a volatile liquid, though.
On 6/17/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce

8) From: Geary Lyons
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
WD-40 is actually a rust preventative.  The initials are literally for Water
Replacement. Removing the water from minute metal crevices helps to prevent
rust. Not a great rust remover, but it works in a pinch!  Restoring old
sports cars has taught be that it is best to use the right tool for the job!
Cheers,
Geary

9) From: Ed Needham
heheheh...Wouldn't that be WR-40?  Maybe Water Dis-placement?
I know, I know, typo, brain fart, hangover, but it's funny anyway.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
ed at homeroaster dot com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

10) From: Geary Lyons
Yeah! Yeah! ;-0!  Sometimes I struggle with "what I type" versus "what I
think I type".  Too bad microsoft does have a "Content Intent Check"! But
then I would have missed a chuckle at my own expense!!
Cheers,
Geary


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