HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Panama Trifecta is sold out - temporarily (7 msgs / 291 lines)
1) From: Thbull
Well it happened...after getting approval from the CFO, I went to
place my Panama Triple pack order and discovered that it was out of
stock.
Here is the message I got from the web merchant:
Sorry, we are currently sold out of 'The 2006 Best of Panama Green
Coffee - Set of 3# Limit 1'. This is probably just a temporary outage,
so check back soon
So there is hope that I can still get some....
I have learned my lesson...but first and ask forgiveness later ;)
-Peace
Thbull 'waiting for more'

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
I'm 99.976% certain that is simply a pre-programmed generic web merchant
message. In this case said message 99.999835% certain to be incorrect since
the Panama Trifecta were specific Auction Lots, already signed sealed and
delivered. (I'm seldom 100% sure of anything except death and taxes;-)
However, all hope to get Gesha is not lost. Last year in addition to the
Auction Lot Gesha Tom was able to source a limited amount of some more Gesha
a bit later. As you already know, if Tom does get some more Gesha this year
don't wait to order!
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
Pacific Northwest Gathering IVhttp://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must">http://home.comcast.net/~mdmint/pnwgIV.htmURL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>
<Snip>

3) From: Steve Hay
On 6/19/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
I just tried to add some $100 beans to my cart and it seemed to work again.
Is it possible the glitch is a sign that Tom is running low?  He'd probably
hate to sell it and find out he was a few pounds short prior to packaging
for retail resale.
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

4) From: raymanowen
I'm sure glad, if the Panama Trifecta did in fact sell out. I hope to be in
line next time we can "vote" for the coffee farmers that take the risk of
producing a superb crop of coffee.
Big Coffee would never support it. The individual farmer is on thin ice and
risking his career to produce coffee even Honeybucks would shun.
So, if you absolutely must have the low priced Big Farm Floor Sweep grounds,
go for it. There are whole aisles of coffee-like floor sweep in the grocery.
Kitty litter works for Oil-Dri.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
On 6/19/06, Steve Hay  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita WurliTzer- 1976

5) From: Steve Hay
On 6/19/06, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
?
Is 'you' anyone in particular?  Me?  If so, I don't understand the remark.
On another note, today I brought into work some Honduran Peaberry taken well
into second crack (FC++, I'm guessing, oil droplets on about 10% of the
beans after a two day rest) and something is working with these "longer"
roast profiles.  There was a bit of char to it, I admit, that didn't go
perfectly with the chocolately undertones, but it was still very very good,
and better than the quicker 6 minute lighter roasts I'd been giving it.
Tonight I shaved a minute off the roast profile and I think I ended at FC.
I heard some crackling while cooling (anyone else here this sometimes and
not know whether its second crack or the beans just rattling around in the
chamber due to high airflow?)  I'm hoping I achieve some balance and hit the
chocolate sweet spot with this roast.  If not, I'll probably try to start
leveling off my temps earlier in the roast to bring it more slowly through
the beginnings of first crack.  (A bit haphazard, I get about a minute into
first crack before I start leveling off, which is about 30 seconds to a
minute later than I usually hit, but I'm too lazy to reprogram my iRoast and
figured I'd give something different a shot).
Some others much earlier suggested that a dip in temperatures was bad news
for coffee roasting.. I'm not sure with the iRoast I entirely agree..  These
roasts have in them about a 5 degree dip in temperature during the
transition from fast ramp to leveling off, and I've not noticed anything off
in the flavor...  I'm wondering if this is just an instrumentation thing
going on due to the changing airflow in the chamber. (I keep my probe out of
the main airflow on the outside of the downcomer annulus in between the
glass chamber and the rubber gasket).  Still, it would be possible to make
the transition slower or earlier to reduce or eliminate the dip; I've done
it in the past with moderate success, usually by inserting an intermediate
step about 30 seconds before the full shift to slow ramp occurs.
Another thing odd about this bean is that it looks a lot darker in the
chamber than out..  Moreso somehow than other beans..  The beans turn dark
very quickly (at least this is what it looks like in the chamber) and then
stay dark..  Outside the chamber they look pretty normal.  The roast I just
pulled out looked nearly black while roasting, but pulled out it was a dry
milk chocolate brown.
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

6) From: raymanowen
Hay, Steve-
Somebody on the list has made it abundantly clear that he's bitter about the
cost of green specialty coffee, and my remarks were meant to indicate that,
while I am currently in a $$  forced stash redux mode, I admire and
encourage those who do support the grower that takes the risk to produce
phenomenal coffee.
Who says it's all that worthy? Tom Owen, of Sweet Maria's and many of his
peers in the coffee trading business.
My limited economic understanding is that growers take a risk in catering to
the Fickle Specialty Coffee market. Especially in the face of unsupported
criticism. Adam Smith's Invisible Hand will clear it off the deck if the
critics find much agreement.
I totally agree with your roast profiles- I usually touch second by coaxing
a few snaps with my heat gun unless the notes call for less. Then I quench
it.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
On 6/19/06, Steve Hay  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita WurliTzer- 1976

7) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-14-718502780
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My feeling is that we normally save so much money buying greens to  
roast ($4-6/lb. as opposed to $11-13 already roasted and heaven knows  
how much per lb. if we're buying cup-by-cup) that the occasional  
splurge price for a COE winner, Kona, PR Yauco or JBM is justified-- 
especially when you realize specialty growers normally don't even  
clear a dollar a pound except from conscientious buyers like Tom &  
Maria.
On Jun 20, 2006, at 1:04 AM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-14-718502780
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My feeling is that we normally =
save so much money buying greens to roast ($4-6/lb. as opposed to $11-13 =
already roasted and heaven knows how much per lb. if we're buying =
cup-by-cup) that the occasional splurge price for a COE winner, Kona, PR =
Yauco or JBM is justified--especially when you realize specialty growers =
normally don't even clear a dollar a pound except from conscientious =
buyers like Tom & Maria.
On Jun 20, 2006, at 1:04 AM, =
raymanowen =
wrote:
Hay, Steve- Somebody on the list has made it abundantly = clear that he's bitter about the cost of green specialty coffee, and my = remarks were meant to indicate that, while I am currently in a $$  = forced stash redux mode, I admire and encourage those who do support the = grower that takes the risk to produce phenomenal coffee. Who = says it's all that worthy? Tom Owen, of Sweet Maria's and many of his = peers in the coffee trading business. My limited economic = understanding is that growers take a risk in catering to the Fickle = Specialty Coffee market. Especially in the face of unsupported = criticism. Adam Smith's Invisible Hand will clear it off the deck if the = critics find much agreement. I totally agree with your roast = profiles- I usually touch second by coaxing a few snaps with my heat gun = unless the notes call for less. Then I quench it. Cheers -RayO, = aka Opa! On 6/19/06, Steve Hay <hay.steve> = wrote: On 6/19/06, raymanowen = < = raymanowen> wrote: So, if you absolutely must have the low = priced Big Farm Floor Sweep grounds, go for it. There are whole aisles = of coffee-like floor sweep in the grocery. Kitty litter works for = Oil-Dri. ? Is = 'you' anyone in particular?  Me?  If so, I don't understand the = remark. On another note, today I brought into work some Honduran = Peaberry taken well into second crack (FC++, I'm guessing, oil droplets = on about 10% of the beans after a two day rest) and something is working = with these "longer" roast profiles.  There was a bit of char to it, I = admit, that didn't go perfectly with the chocolately undertones, but it = was still very very good, and better than the quicker 6 minute lighter = roasts I'd been giving it.  Tonight I shaved a minute off the roast = profile and I think I ended at FC.  I heard some crackling while = cooling (anyone else here this sometimes and not know whether its second = crack or the beans just rattling around in the chamber due to high = airflow?)  I'm hoping I achieve some balance and hit the chocolate = sweet spot with this roast.  If not, I'll probably try to start = leveling off my temps earlier in the roast to bring it more slowly = through the beginnings of first crack.  (A bit haphazard, I get about = a minute into first crack before I start leveling off, which is about 30 = seconds to a minute later than I usually hit, but I'm too lazy to = reprogram my iRoast and figured I'd give something different a shot). = Some others much earlier suggested that a dip in temperatures = was bad news for coffee roasting.. I'm not sure with the iRoast I = entirely agree..  These roasts have in them about a 5 degree dip in = temperature during the transition from fast ramp to leveling off, and = I've not noticed anything off in the flavor...  I'm wondering if this = is just an instrumentation thing going on due to the changing airflow in = the chamber. (I keep my probe out of the main airflow on the outside of = the downcomer annulus in between the glass chamber and the rubber = gasket).  Still, it would be possible to make the transition slower or = earlier to reduce or eliminate the dip; I've done it in the past with = moderate success, usually by inserting an intermediate step about 30 = seconds before the full shift to slow ramp occurs.
Another thing odd about this bean is that it looks a = lot darker in the chamber than out..  Moreso somehow than other = beans..  The beans turn dark very quickly (at least this is what it = looks like in the chamber) and then stay dark..  Outside the chamber = they look pretty normal.  The roast I just pulled out looked nearly = black while roasting, but pulled out it was a dry milk chocolate brown. = -- = Steven Hay hay.steve -AT- gmail.com Barry = Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural = numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a = natural number which requires more than 50 words to describe it." =
-- "When = the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty = Wichita WurliTzer- 1976 = --Apple-Mail-14-718502780--


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