HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Fannie Farmer says.... about coffee (54 lines)
1) From: Scott Miller
Should something unfortunate happen to my 1934 copy of The Boston 
Cooking School Cook Book, it's nice to know the entire book is online... 
The 1918 edition (last one authored completely by Farmer) was chosen by 
bartleby.com
About 1/3 of the way down the page you can see what FF says about coffee.
I know boiled or cowboy coffee has been discussed before on the list.
Here's the FF way (I find the sentence about saving any leftover coffee 
can be saved for making jelly to be interesting.. Coffee Jelly????)
cheers,
ScoTTT
1 cup coffee
1 cup cold water
1 egg
6 cups boiling water
Scald granite-ware coffee-pot. Wash egg, break, and beat slightly. 
Dilute with one-half the cold water, add crushed shell, and mix with 
coffee. Turn into coffee-pot, pour on boiling water, and stir 
thoroughly. Place on front of range, and boil three minutes. If not
boiled, coffee is cloudy; if boiled too long, too much tannic acid is 
developed. The spout of pot should be covered or stuffed with soft paper 
to prevent escape of fragrant aroma. Stir and pour some in a cup to be 
sure that spout is free from grounds. Return to coffee-pot and repeat. 
Add remaining cold water, which perfects clearing. Cold water being 
heavier than hot water sinks to the bottom, carrying grounds with it. 
Place on back of range for ten minutes, where coffee will not boil. 
Serve at once. If any is left over, drain from grounds, and reserve for 
making of jelly or other dessert.
Egg-shells may be saved and used for clearing coffee. Three egg-shells 
are sufficient to effect clearing where one cup of ground coffee is 
used. The shell performs no office in clearing except for the albumen 
which clings to it. One-fourth cup cold water, salt fish-skin, washed, 
dried, and cut in inch pieces, is used for same purpose.
Coffee made with an egg has a rich flavor which egg alone can give. 
Where strict economy is necessary, if great care is taken, egg may be 
omitted. Coffee so made should be served from range, as much motion 
causes it to become roiled.
Tin is an undesirable material for a coffee-pot, as tannic acid acts on 
such metal and is apt to form a poisonous compound.


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