HomeRoast Digest


Topic: brewing for large numbers (9 msgs / 225 lines)
1) From: Thbull
Afternoon,
There has been quite a lot of discussion regarding the Bunn brewers. I
was wondering if there were any other large or high capacity brewers
that are good wnough for our home-roasted coffee. This would be for
brewing for church/wedding/reception where the number of coffee
drinkers is around 75 -100.
Any advice gained from experience would be very helpful.
TIA,
Thbull 'not uring for more puns'

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
In the past I've used a 54 cup and 30 cup West Bend percolators. Refilling
the 54 cup from the 30 cup new brewing. Even as poor a brewing method as
perc' is it'll yield a cup far superior to what most "commoners" are
accustomed to. 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>

3) From: Scott Marquardt
Just this past Sunday I filled a Fetco 2 gallon Luxus container with great
coffee using a Melitta 103 (a ceramic cone that uses #6 filters). It took
four batches. However, I used a 5 micron (nominal) polyester felt filter I'd
sewn to #6 dimensions just that morning.
Worked great -- but the bloom was a bit of a pain. I'd have done better to
have mixed the coffee in another container, then poured it through.
I used a coarser than French press grind, though that wouldn't have been
necessary, as it turns out.
Manual pourover of 2 gallons is not convenient that way. To be honest, I
wouldn't mind the manualness of it if there were a full-size basket intended
for manual use, that I could mount atop the Fetco.
- Scott
On 6/26/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Philip Keleshian
I have a suggestion.  I haven't yet tried this but I can't think of a
reason why it won't work.  Every church seems to have at least one of
those nasty giant percolators.  Now I can't bring myself to percolate
coffee. What I would do is get some of those cloth bags Tom sells for
storing green coffee. 
Do what it takes to close the bag well enough to contain ground coffee.
Set aside the innards of the nasty percolator. 
Fill the percolator with water and turn it on.
Grind the coffee and put it in the bags.
When the water comes to a boil (or the percolator thinks it is done)
turn it off and put the bags in.
Steep the coffee for about three minutes while gently stirring.
Remove the bags and serve.
I would experiment on a small scale to optimize the grind for this
method before using 50 cups of home roast.
Phil

5) From: rwh
I think I'd use the ubiquitous giant stock pot that also seems to be in
every church kitchen since all you really need is hot water.
Maybe a visit to a farm supply store would be in order. If you could
find the right filter material, a giant funnel could possibly be coaxed
into a pour-over drip arrangement.
Seriously, the commercial Bunn units seems to cycle pretty fast.
Combined with a couple of large air pots you could probably handle a
fairly large group of people without too much effort.
--rick
Philip Keleshian wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: miKe mcKoffee
I should note in my defense versus stereotyped gunked up church percolators
that those two percs I was using are mine, and were quite (un)religiously
kept clean;-)
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>

7) From: Scott Marquardt
In all seriousness, for such occasions you might consider this source:http://midwestfilter.com/bags.htmlYou'll want polyester felt -- probably 5 micron. Absolutely not more than
10.
I've used polyester felt from other sources; I have some samples coming from
midwest, and will post my results.
They've been very helpful as I've been learning and researching all this.
Avoid mesh and paper for large quantities, unless you're using a large
basket with fluted filters to increase surface area. If you use polyester,
you can re-use it *IMO*. There's no way you can clean it entirely, so it's a
question of sanitation and etiquette, IMO. For my own use, I find washing
the material very well to be adequate.
- Scott

8) From: raymanowen
The percolator- about as common in churches as collection plates- can heat
the water to a good brewing temperature. Then you could jury rig a couple of
fine mesh strainers together to form a "coffee ball."  I hate "seasoned"
equipment that is purposely allowed to accumulate gunk and residue.
(Patients started living longer after OR procedures when surgeons stopped
using seasoned tools and gowns!)
If I wanted a 4-minute brew at 204 degrees F, I could do it perfectly with
the coffee ball, or Scott's filter pouch? idea. I have had no use for the
ability to brew so rapidly. It just seems to be a good way to nail the
optimum brew time, temperature and strength.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
On 6/26/06, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita WurliTzer- 1976

9) From: Scott Marquardt
Some of the big players are apparently doing cold extraction in barrel sized
lots, using similar filter equipment. The issue for me is control of
variables. I want wide latitude, so that if things run amok somehow (lose
control of one variable), I can lateral to controlling another and still end
up with a good brew.
For example, a polyester felt filters in depth, not on the surface.
Therefore, it won't stall. It passes the coffee relatively quickly. This
allows me to control for flow and judge time well. Aaack! I forgot to adjust
the grind! No problem. By the time I discover that with the felt, I can
still finish extraction and get the liquid out in time. Had I discovered
that with, say, a paper -- I wouldn't have any options at all by the time I
discovered it.
But control also allows not just a forgiving "brew space," it provides for
new possibilities. For example, doing a couple gallons with a bloomin' #6
filter cone (felt). Ridiculous with paper, for that size filter. Easy with
felt because of the flow rate.
And all the oils through.   ;-)
On 6/27/06, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Scott


HomeRoast Digest