HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Roasting Mexican Altura with a Caffe Rosto (4 msgs / 218 lines)
1) From: robert Howell
I hope this gets through.  Although I have posted now and then for several years, my last attempt was returned because I was not registered. I thought by being on the list I was registered.  Oh, well.
   
  Anyway, I live a long way down in Mexico in the state of Nayarit. The growing area is small, so the selection is not good.  Getting coffee from other areas would mean traveling to that area.  It is impossible to find green beans from other areas in Mexico unless you, or friends, travel to that area.  Nevermind that Mexico produces a lot of coffee, home roasting is unknown, at least I have never met a Mexican in the area where I live who homeroasts.  Importing beans is not an economical option.  
   
  That being said, I am limited to roasting Altura type coffee.  Although, I have noted many different tastes depending on the soil and altitude here. generally, I am happy with the coffee that I roast.  However, because (I think) of the fluctuating electric current and the amount I have in my scoop when I roast, and the differences in time that I let my beans rest after roasting, each pot is a surprise.
   
  I have a bed and breakfast and I roast about a sack a year (69 kilos) for my guests.  (My tourist season only lasts from Nov to Apr) What I would like to get is some feedback from those that use the cafe rosto, and hopefully have experience with Mexican Altura,  as to the amount of coffee (grams or ounces) that they roast at a time, how long they let it rest and how fine they grind it.  I have on hand 3 Cafe Rostos.  All are working now, thanks to the advice I received on this forum for bypassing the thermostadt when the rosto failed.
   
  I roast to about what most would call a full city or a light french.  My rosto takes about 6 1/2 minutes to reach this.  I use a burr grinder and set it to just above a fine grind, maybe a light course.  I try and let the beans breath in a jar, with the lid not quite tight, overnight, or if I roast in the morning, until late afternoon.  Say, 8 to 12 hours.  I then tighten the lid and wait at least another 12 hours.  I just noticed a posting herein that said I should wait 36 hours.  I am going to try that.
   
  What happens is - sometimes I get a great cup of coffee.  Mellow, and even more rarely, a slight choclate flavor, and not bitter.  Sometimes the coffee tastes almost bland.  Other times it is not bad but then a slight bitter taste emerges after the first acceptable taste.
   
  I know that my drip coffee maker is not the greatest, but there is not much of a selection down here.  It is an Oster.  I had a Black and Decker which I used for over 10 years, but I really donīt notice any difference between the two (my Black and Decker packed in).  I make a point of cleaning all of my brewing equipment with baking soda about once a month.
   
  Anyway, may I hear from some of you on this.
   
  Thanks
   
  Bob Howell
  Rincon de Guayabitos
  Nayarit
  Mexico
---------------------------------
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2) From: miKe mcKoffee
Hi Bob, good to hear you posting again! 
You've got multiple problems if you're hoping for roast consistency.
Electric roasters are voltage sensitive, some more so than others. The =
Rosto
is no exception. Plus, different Rostos at the same voltage roast =
slightly
(or even radically) different. The first thing you'd highly benefit from =
is
getting your hands on a variac so you'll have consistent voltage to your
Rostos. (10A rating or better)
"Best" amount of beans wise will vary by green and by Rosto (fan =
strengths
often different machine to machine) Since you're primarily roasting the =
same
or similar bean density that not as big an issue as for others. A good
method is using just enough greens so they barely move at all when first
starting roast. Very slight bean movement start of roast. 
Rest wise I'd schedule roasts so you'll be grinding and serving about 4 =
or 5
days rest. I think you'll find you'll get more complete complex cups =
that
way. Try it for yourself! Brew some of the same roast at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 =
days
rest and see how they taste to you. Taste is the ultimate guide.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I =
must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal =
enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone =
before.
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of robert =
Howell
	Sent: Monday, July 10, 2006 7:07 AM
	
	
	I hope this gets through.  Although I have posted now and then for
several years, my last attempt was returned because I was not =
registered. I
thought by being on the list I was registered.  Oh, well.
	 
	Anyway, I live a long way down in Mexico in the state of Nayarit.
The growing area is small, so the selection is not good.  Getting coffee
from other areas would mean traveling to that area.  It is impossible to
find green beans from other areas in Mexico unless you, or friends, =
travel
to that area.  Nevermind that Mexico produces a lot of coffee, home =
roasting
is unknown, at least I have never met a Mexican in the area where I live =
who
homeroasts.  Importing beans is not an economical option.  
	 
	That being said, I am limited to roasting Altura type coffee.
Although, I have noted many different tastes depending on the soil and
altitude here. generally, I am happy with the coffee that I roast.  =
However,
because (I think) of the fluctuating electric current and the amount I =
have
in my scoop when I roast, and the differences in time that I let my =
beans
rest after roasting, each pot is a surprise.
	 
	I have a bed and breakfast and I roast about a sack a year (69
kilos) for my guests.  (My tourist season only lasts from Nov to Apr) =
What I
would like to get is some feedback from those that use the cafe rosto, =
and
hopefully have experience with Mexican Altura,  as to the amount of =
coffee
(grams or ounces) that they roast at a time, how long they let it rest =
and
how fine they grind it.  I have on hand 3 Cafe Rostos.  All are working =
now,
thanks to the advice I received on this forum for bypassing the =
thermostadt
when the rosto failed.
	 
	I roast to about what most would call a full city or a light french.
My rosto takes about 6 1/2 minutes to reach this.  I use a burr grinder =
and
set it to just above a fine grind, maybe a light course.  I try and let =
the
beans breath in a jar, with the lid not quite tight, overnight, or if I
roast in the morning, until late afternoon.  Say, 8 to 12 hours.  I then
tighten the lid and wait at least another 12 hours.  I just noticed a
posting herein that said I should wait 36 hours.  I am going to try =
that.
	 
	What happens is - sometimes I get a great cup of coffee.  Mellow,
and even more rarely, a slight choclate flavor, and not bitter.  =
Sometimes
the coffee tastes almost bland.  Other times it is not bad but then a =
slight
bitter taste emerges after the first acceptable taste.
	 
	I know that my drip coffee maker is not the greatest, but there is
not much of a selection down here.  It is an Oster.  I had a Black and
Decker which I used for over 10 years, but I really donīt notice any
difference between the two (my Black and Decker packed in).  I make a =
point
of cleaning all of my brewing equipment with baking soda about once a =
month.
	 
	Anyway, may I hear from some of you on this.
	 
	Thanks
	 
	Bob Howell
	Rincon de Guayabitos
	Nayarit
	Mexico

3) From: Dave Nielsen
Bob,
Adding to what miKe posted:  based on your description of process it
sounds like you grind your coffee right after roasting and then jar
and rest.  Try resting the beans whole and then grind just prior to
use and see how that impacts the flavor of the brewed coffee.
Regards,
--Dave

4) From: Marc
Bob,
I too have a Rosto and I second miKe's suggestion of a variac. It costs
almost as much as the Rosto itself but it's the best first step to
controlling and reproducing a roast. He said 10A or better, while I would
recommend a 20A (See the one for sale on SweetMaria's site). The next item
would be a temperature probe (again see SM's site), a watch and a notepad t=
o
monitor temp and time, this is how to repeat roasts.
If you have been reading the list, you can see that some of us go quite far
in adding on to the roaster to better control and repeat roasts. Take a loo=
k
at miKe's Rosto mods - I've done some to my own (especially the seperate fa=
n
and heater controls). It all depends on how much you want to get into it an=
d
how much you want to spend...)
As for bean weight, my Rosto seems to be happiest roasting in the 6.2
to 6.4oz range. (This also gives me 5 roasts per 2 lb bag from SM, not
an issue
for you). Tilting the Rosto, especially in the beginning helps a lot. Again=
,
as miKe says, each Rosto differ in fan strenght.
Good luck,
Marc
On 7/10/06, robert Howell  wrote:
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