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Topic: OT: Re: +Pecan Jim (6 msgs / 146 lines)
1) From: jim gundlach
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Barbara,
    Thanks you make it 96 supportive email messages  to 71 hate.  It  
has been an interesting few days.  I spent a couple of hours on the  
phone with staff at the House Ways and Means Committee yesterday  
afternoon.  Seems that they are looking into holding hearings on  
removing the tax exempt status of collegiate athletics.  If and when  
the hold hearings, I've agreed to be a witness.   Back to coffee  
tomorrow.
     Jim
On Jul 17, 2006, at 7:03 PM, Barbara C. Greenspon wrote:
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Barbara,   Thanks you =
make it 96 supportive email messages  to 71 hate.  It has been an =
interesting few days.  I spent a couple of hours on the phone with =
staff at the House Ways and Means Committee yesterday afternoon.  =
Seems that they are looking into holding hearings on removing the tax =
exempt status of collegiate athletics.  If and when the hold =
hearings, I've agreed to be a witness.   Back to coffee =
tomorrow.    Jim
On Jul 17, =
2006, at 7:03 PM, Barbara C. Greenspon wrote:
Jim, you are courageous and inspiring.  Thank you. = Barbara Jared Andersson wrote: On 7/14/06, = jim gundlach <PecanJim> = wrote: Yes, this is one of the things that has limited my list = time....... Jim I think you are nobel and = brave.  I am proud to know you.  Jared = = --Apple-Mail-1--1038234826--

2) From: Barbara C. Greenspon
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Again, good for you.
We lived in Birmingham from 1970-77 where Tom was on the faculty of the 
medical center (he's a Psychologist).  We didn't have local college 
sports then, but it didn't matter.  It was as if we were in Tuscaloosa 
on game days.  We did know several young people who were truly scholars 
and athletes, but, unfortunately, they were few and far between.
Every so often, someone does a good thing, even though they take a risk 
to do it, and we are all the better for it.  Thank you again, and the 
best to you.  Enjoy the coffee.  At least it seems as if our list is 
behind you.
Barbara
jim gundlach wrote:
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3) From: Elliott Perkins
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Just a word from the chorus here,
Great stuff, Pecan Jim.  I enjoy sports, including big-time sports on 
television, but I think college sports are corrupt and wrong.  Thanks 
for helping to stop it.
Best regards,
Elliott Perkins
jim gundlach wrote:
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4) From: raymanowen
Elliott-
I hope you didn't think Jim excused himself from Auburn because "...college
sports are corrupt and wrong."
The man's a Prince and will distance himself from college sports' being
corrupted on his watch.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Espresso is a Best Use of water resources-

5) From: Justin Marquez
On 7/20/06, Elliott Perkins  wrote:
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Given the criminal activity and steroid debacles seen in pro sports in
recent years, one could make the same judgement about big-time sports
as well.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)

6) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
A few thoughts on these matters:
Foremost, it's not easy being a whistle-blower under any circumstances, but
especially when it violates the norms of the culture (in this case, to
overlook dishonorable practices).  So congratulations, Jim.
Likewise, it's not easy for 19 year-olds to defy norms that make it OK to
take advantage of "opportunities" that respected people in responsible
positions lay out for them.
Let's follow what happens to the highly placed administrators, coaches, and
university officials who must have known about these practices, and see if
their level of exposure and embarrassment matches that of the students and
faculty who are involved.  It's these abundantly degree'd "role models" who
are corrupt, not "college sports."
For those who rail against academic tenure, here's a case where guaranteed
free expression is a useful condition of employment.  Couldn't expect a
junior faculty to take risks like this.  (sorry if I'm making incorrect
assumptions here).
Great universities are more inclined to support and scaffold academically
struggling athletes than to help them cheat their way to a diploma.
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary


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