HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Poppers beat Pros > RE: +RE: getting started part deux (9 msgs / 243 lines)
1) From: miKe mcKoffee
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
	Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2006 9:13 AM
 Franlky any bean, roasted any way at all in a popper, will
out-perform any bean bought in a coffee shop. 
<Snip>
I understand the sentiment, yet disagree for many reasons. There are coffee
shops that do an excellent job roasting high quality beans. And not roasting
ala *$ dark but Artisans of their craft. Many roast date their roasts too.
One I know of even donates any beans over week post roast to shelters. OTH
many popper's roast too fast to do a decent light roast (like City) without
modifications. Even most stock made for home roast appliance air roasters
roast faster than the fluid bed design by Sivetz. (10 to 15min range) As I
understand it the original purpose behind fluid bed roasting wasn't for a
faster roast but for a cleaner less smoky roast. 
Absolutely popper home roasts "can" be superior to many if not most coffee
shops and possibly match the best. Even a fresh mediocre home roast superior
to about all that stale grocery store aisle bin or shelf bagged coffee. But
a bad home roast is still a bad home roast. Any over roasted end of 2nd
going for 3rd "OOOooopps got away from me" home roast will still be over
roasted, carbony and or ashy and a too fast light roast uneven through out
the bean itself very often grassy or grainy.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

2) From: Brett Mason
Let me rephrase...
There are some coffee shops that do not compare with home roasted coffee.
You pick the percent:
  home roasted coffee is better than    1% of the coffee shops out there
  home roasted coffee is better than    5% of the coffee shops out there
  home roasted coffee is better than  10% of the coffee shops out there
  home roasted coffee is better than  20% of the coffee shops out there
  home roasted coffee is better than  30% of the coffee shops out there
  home roasted coffee is better than  40% of the coffee shops out there
  home roasted coffee is better than  50% of the coffee shops out there
  home roasted coffee is better than  60% of the coffee shops out there
  home roasted coffee is better than  70% of the coffee shops out there
  home roasted coffee is better than  80% of the coffee shops out there
   home roasted coffee is better than  90% of the coffee shops out there
   home roasted coffee is better than  95% of the coffee shops out there
   home roasted coffee is better than 100% of the coffee shops out there
For me, it's better than 95% of the coffee shops out there.
As a standard, I always purchase and taste an espresso from the shop.  Then
I'll try their brewed coffee.
I am usually disappointed twice...
Your mileage may vary,
Brett
On 7/25/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman

3) From: Scott Marquardt
What this signifies, though, is that such coffee shops are not owned and
operated by coffee lovers, but by business people who understand a sale as a
commodity transaction -- not an occasion to share one's pride in achieving
an artisinal roast and a crafted brew.
I would suspect that THIS is why so many home roasters can produce so many
good cups, relatively as you say.
Having said that, there are some yahoo home roasters out there, too. Good
grief.
- S
On 7/25/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: miKe mcKoffee
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Scott Marquardt
	Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2006 4:14 PM
	
<Snip>
and operated by coffee lovers, but by business people who understand a sale
as a commodity transaction -- not an occasion to share one's pride in
achieving an artisinal roast and a crafted brew. 
<Snip>
Unfortunately all too true. A few years ago I attended a CoffeeFest workshop
about beginners espresso. What it turned out to be was the vast majority in
the audience were looking to "cash in" on the espresso biz' and didn't know
the first thing about espresso. At least they went somewhere to get some
information! Here's a scary CG post that illustrates the seemingly all to
common approach some take:http://www.coffeegeek.com/forums/espresso/machines/243787Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

5) From: miKe mcKoffee
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
	Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2006 2:06 PM
<Snip>
	As a standard, I always purchase and taste an espresso from the
shop.  Then I'll try their brewed coffee.
	I am usually disappointed twice...
<Snip>
You're either braver than me or a masochist! I kind a follow the adage fool
me once shame on you, fool me twice shame on me. Truth be told most places
I'll first have a look around and observe, if it seems to warrant a try I'll
usually first ask a question or two like do you pull ristrettos, if yes then
ask them how, 9 times out of 10 I order nothing. Life's too short to drink
bad coffee.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

6) From: Steve Hay
On 7/25/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
That guy seemed interested in learning more and improving his product.  What
better way to do that then get started?  To me, I got the impression he dove
in head first and was now preparing to swim.
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

7) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Yes he dove in and now is looking to learn how to swim. Agreed he's looking
to improve what is currently a terrible operation. My point how many
espresso beverages have been and will be served to folks with coffee ground
walking into the grocery store and grinding in advance for the espresso
stands use? And stale grinds not dialed in for the shots just one small
factor in pulling decent shots.  Buying a espresso business with zero
knowledge of espresso because it sounds like a "good investment" does not
yield a good cup. That is my point of why there is so much crap served as
espresso out there. 
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee 
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm
Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Steve Hay
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2006 3:48 AM
On 7/25/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote: 
information! Here's a scary CG post that illustrates the seemingly all to
common approach some take:http://www.coffeegeek.com/forums/espresso/machines/243787 
tinfo.html#personalsettings
That guy seemed interested in learning more and improving his product.  What
better way to do that then get started?  To me, I got the impression he dove
in head first and was now preparing to swim. 
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it." 

8) From: Justin Marquez
On 7/26/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
Which is very likely why so many people will say "Oh, I don't like espresso!".
Likely they never actually had a properly made espresso. Without all
the necessary components being present, INCLUDING a trained and
motivated barista, it is all but impossible to get it right. Not just
"consistently", but "ever".
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)

9) From: Brett Mason
To bring this around full circle, maybe my first point was correct:
    "Frankly any bean, roasted any way at all in a popper, will out-perform
any bean bought in a coffee shop."
There are a minute handful of shops, somewhere other than where I have been,
that defy this statement.  But as a rule, it holds.
Brett
On 7/26/06, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman


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