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Topic: new question....... (11 msgs / 338 lines)
1) From: Scjgb3
how good, is the coffee that a cory or other vacuum coffee pot produce.  
while its on my mind how about a chemex brewer? both of which i  want.

2) From: Lissa
on 07/27/2006 11:19 PM Scjgb3 said the following:
<Snip>
Both very good. A vacuum brewer is easy, in that you never need to worry 
about water temp. Plus, they are excellent entertainment. I've watched 
people drink coffee to the point of nearly being ill, just so they could 
watch the coffee go up and down again.
Be sure to pull it off the heat source after the water goes up. Trying 
to pull a boiled dry vacuum pot off before it explodes can lead to very 
painful burns.
A chemex, like a vacuum pot, produces a clean, tasty cup. It is 
simplicity itself. I tend to use mine on days off, or when my autodrip 
pot is down. But, you do need to pay attention to the temperature of the 
water when you pour it in.
A chemex can handle a fine grind, a vacuum pot takes around the same as 
an autodrip, or a tad courser. If it stalls, go a bit courser next time.
Be well,
Lissa
-- 
No future is complete without a flying car, but it's the
invention that like Longhorn, never arrives.
Andrew Orlowski, "Is Microsoft Preparing a Flying Car?"http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/01/24/msn_driving_instructions/

3) From: Scjgb3
will the water temp differ from bean to bean, say like different teas  do?

4) From: Lissa
on 07/27/2006 11:34 PM Scjgb3 said the following:
<Snip>
Coffee isn't that picky, in my experience. Just go with the usual 195 to 
200 degrees F.
Be well,
Lissa
-- 
The circle of the English language has a well-defined
centre, but no discernible circumference.
James Murray, Introduction to the Oxford English Dictionary

5) From: Andy Thomas
Those are two of my favorite brewing methods. Well
worth the relatively modest investment.
--- Scjgb3 wrote:
<Snip>
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

6) From: Barry Luterman
My wife occasionally likes tea. She used to microwave a cup of hot water and 
then immerse the tea in the water. Since I have had an espresso machine I 
have been pulling water out of the machine at 203 degrees rather than 
boiling the water at who knows what degree. She claims the tea is much 
improved. Don't know myself I only drink the stuff when I am desperately ill 
or in a Chinese Restaurant.

7) From: David B. Westebbe
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Both of them are capable of making excellent coffee.

8) From: Woody DeCasere
<Snip>
Depends on the model You are using, my YAMA keeps a bit of water in the
bottom and i keep the heat on to keep the coffee up top for 2 minutes before
removing the heat.
On 7/28/06, David B. Westebbe  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Good night, and Good Coffee"
www.onthisjourney.typepad.com

9) From: David B. Westebbe
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Same with old Silex vac pots.  I keep it on a low heat for around 2 1/2
minutes after it starts going north.  It takes about 1 1/2 minutes to go
south, resulting in a 4 minute brew time.

10) From: B. Scott Harroff
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I have several different brew methods; PIDd and OPV'd Silvia, Cona D, Cona
B, Hario Nuevo, Technivorm KBTS, Swiss Gold One Cup, Aeropress, etc.
Of those methods, I use two over 90% of the time.  Hario Nuevo Vac Pot, and
Technivorm.  If I have the extra 7-10 minutes, I'll always use the Vac Pot.
If I'm in a hurry, Technivorm.
The main difference I see is the Hario gets the water up to boiling (212)
and by the time it's up and into the coffee in 30 seconds or so, it is at
202-203.  And, the coffee continues to infuse for the entire brew cycle
(however long I want) at 202 - 203.  If I want the temp cooler, I don't let
the initial water reach boiling before letting it rise. It's complete
control over temperature and infusion time.  The Cona's function the same
way, but the leave significantly more water in the lower chamber (that
doesn't infuse with the coffee).  The Hario leaves almost none.  I've
blinded tasted the Cona and Hario side by side and can tell the difference.
I would say the Hario is a superior from a design and functional standpoint
while the Cona is superiour from an elegance and presentation standpoint.
The Technivorm, while it may "drip water" at 200, does not keep the brewing
coffee at 200.  If one follows Tom's plug-the-basket, let it drip for 30
secs, stir, then goto half flow, the basket water is around 187-190.  I do
use that method by the way as I believe it mixes the coffee and water better
than just letting it flow and hoping it all eventually mixes.  The temp may
rise as the initial coffee mix drains, but it never gets back to 200.
I'f I'm on the road I prefer the Swissgold over the Aeropress.  Its strikes
me as being easier to use, easier to clean up, and I get a better cup
(flavor wise).  I'm one of the nuts that think the paper / cloth filters
removes flavor via trapping the oils and some of the smaller particles.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Scjgb3
Sent: Thursday, July 27, 2006 11:20 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +new question.......
how good, is the coffee that a cory or other vacuum coffee pot produce.
while its on my mind how about a chemex brewer? both of which i want.

11) From: David Schooley
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On Jul 29, 2006, at 8:25 AM, B. Scott Harroff wrote:
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the  
<Snip>
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<Snip>
There was some discussion about this several weeks ago. According to  
my measurements, the Technivorm is quite capable of brewing the  
coffee at 200 degrees if you leave it alone, or at least do not  
disturb it too much. The first few slugs of water into the basket  
will be below 200 degrees because of everything that needs to heat  
up. The water entering the basket will be near boiling after the brew  =
head heats up. When I took my measurements, the temperature in the  
basket was near 200 degrees for almost the entire cycle because  
everything balances out.
If the basket is plugged at the beginning, then the mass of water in  
the basket will start out cooler than it should and the system might  
not ever catch up. The first few slugs of relatively cool water  
should be allowed to flow into the carafe before the basket is  
plugged. My Technivorm technique has settled on poking the bloom with  =
the handle of plastic spoon (with some light stirring ) part way  
through the cycle to knock down any floating grounds. Given that the  
water has to pass through the grounds to get out of the basket, I am  
happy to trade some mixing for a correct brew temperature. I leave  
the valve on the basket on its partially closed setting during the  
entire cycle to slow things down a bit. I also have the brew head  
with multiple holes.
I normally fill my 1.25 liter Technivorm to the 1 liter (8 cup) mark.  =
If I was inclined to plug the basket and stir, I would wait until the  =
first cup or two of water had passed from the reservoir into the  
basket before setting the basket not to drip so that coolest water  
has exited the basket.  The mass of water in the basket will be  
hotter and therefore easier to heat up later in the cycle.
To each his own.
--Apple-Mail-3--112156361
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On Jul 29, 2006, =
at 8:25 AM, B. Scott Harroff wrote:

The Technivorm, while = it may “drip water” at 200, does not keep the brewing coffee at 200. =  If one follows Tom’s plug-the-basket, let it drip for 30 secs, = stir, then goto half flow, the basket water is around 187-190.  I do = use that method by the way as I believe it mixes the coffee and water = better than just letting it flow and hoping it all eventually mixes. =  The temp may rise as the initial coffee mix drains, but it never gets = back to 200.

If the basket is plugged at = the beginning, then the mass of water in the basket will start out = cooler than it should and the system might not ever catch up. The first = few slugs of relatively cool water should be allowed to flow into the = carafe before the basket is plugged. My Technivorm technique has settled = on poking the bloom with the handle of plastic spoon (with some light = stirring ) part way through the cycle to knock down any floating = grounds. Given that the water has to pass through the grounds to get out = of the basket, I am happy to trade some mixing for a correct brew = temperature. I leave the valve on the basket on its partially closed = setting during the entire cycle to slow things down a bit. I also have = the brew head with multiple holes.
I normally fill my 1.25 = liter Technivorm to the 1 liter (8 cup) mark. If I was inclined to plug = the basket and stir, I would wait until the first cup or two of water = had passed from the reservoir into the basket before setting the basket = not to drip so that coolest water has exited the basket.  The mass of = water in the basket will be hotter and therefore easier to heat up later = in the cycle.
To each his = own.

= --Apple-Mail-3--112156361--



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