HomeRoast Digest


Topic: longer roasting times (9 msgs / 230 lines)
1) From: Scjgb3
I am roasting with a westbend 2 hot air popper, my usual time for the roast  
i prefer is exactly 7min. fc+ which by 24hrs has a little oil showing on my  
beans. After reading some advice from the group, i added a 100' ext. cord now 
my  roasting time is 2.30 to 6min. longer depending on the bean. 
What can a expect flavor wise from the longer  roast?

2) From: Tom Ogren
Lengthening your roast will enable you to have more time pass before
reaching second crack. This means more time for those grassy flavors to
leave the beans, and more time for the good origin flavors to develop fully.
The end result is that you will be able to achieve richer tasting roasts at
lighter roast levels and you won't need roast flavor to mask the remnant
grassiness which may have lingered in the beans. With the longer roast time,
City+ may become your new favorite roast level.
I also roast in a PopperyII. I have had a 100' extension cord for a while,
and although it did add a couple minutes to my roast times, most of my
roasts still run between 6 and 7 minutes. I recently got a Honeywell deskfan
for cooling the beans (great purchase by the way-$10 at Target) and
connected it to the same outlet as my popper. It seems that the electrical
current available to my popper is reduced, thus lengthening my roasts.
Because I really don't know electricity I must ask, is this my imagination?
I roasted the Oaxaca Finca el Olivo to C+ recently with my cooling fan
running on high during the roast and the roast ran about 9 minutes. This is
about 30% longer than my previous roasts. I know ambient temp. plays a big
role too, but I am excited that the cooling  fan might be helping by
reducing available current to the popper (poor man's variac indeed!)
Thoughts from anyone on the cheapest means toward longer roasts?
TO in VA
On 8/11/06, Scjgb3  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
Cheapest way to lengthen a roast (on electric fluid bed roasters) is to have
independent power source to heater and fan and toggle the heater on & off.
Easy to do with some that have both fan & heater AC (like P1 or Rosto),
trickier with AC heater DC fan combo. Works better than just reducing
overall voltage to both via multiple extension cords or single variac or
whatever because doesn't reduce fan speed.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Tom Ogren
	Sent: Friday, August 11, 2006 2:22 PM
	
<Snip>
reaching second crack. This means more time for those grassy flavors to
leave the beans, and more time for the good origin flavors to develop fully.
The end result is that you will be able to achieve richer tasting roasts at
lighter roast levels and you won't need roast flavor to mask the remnant
grassiness which may have lingered in the beans. With the longer roast time,
City+ may become your new favorite roast level. 
	
	I also roast in a PopperyII. I have had a 100' extension cord for a
while, and although it did add a couple minutes to my roast times, most of
my roasts still run between 6 and 7 minutes. I recently got a Honeywell
deskfan for cooling the beans (great purchase by the way-$10 at Target) and
connected it to the same outlet as my popper. It seems that the electrical
current available to my popper is reduced, thus lengthening my roasts.
Because I really don't know electricity I must ask, is this my imagination? 
	
	I roasted the Oaxaca Finca el Olivo to C+ recently with my cooling
fan running on high during the roast and the roast ran about 9 minutes. This
is about 30% longer than my previous roasts. I know ambient temp. plays a
big role too, but I am excited that the cooling  fan might be helping by
reducing available current to the popper (poor man's variac indeed!)
	
	Thoughts from anyone on the cheapest means toward longer roasts?
	
	TO in VA
<Snip>

4) From: David T. Borton
 >>>I also roast in a PopperyII. I have had a 100' extension cord for a 
while, and although it did add a couple minutes to my roast times, most 
of my roasts still run between 6 and 7 minutes...>>>
I visited with the master electrician at work and asked to borrow a 
voltage meter.  He handed me one and asked me what I was up to. I told 
him that my I-Roast 2 was running too hot and I wanted to slow it down 
with an extension cord; wanted to check the voltage.
His words, "Never, ever use an extension cord in the home with any heat 
producing appliance, be it a coffee roaster, a toaster, or a heater.  
You run a tremendous risk of fire, trying to mess around and decrease 
the voltage that way.  Buy a variac, but quit doing this with an 
extension cord."
I know z-i-p about electricity but do respect his work.  No more for me, 
thanks.  $118 at SM's.
DB

5) From: Brett Mason
I get enough emails that start out "Lengthening your..." - and after all,
who needs longer curtains, or longer rugs?
On 8/11/06, Tom Ogren  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman

6) From: Eddie Dove
Tom,
You wrote:
"This means more time for those grassy flavors to leave the beans, and more
time for the good origin flavors to develop fully. The end result is that
you will be able to achieve richer tasting roasts at lighter roast levels
and you won't need roast flavor to mask the remnant grassiness which may
have lingered in the beans. With the longer roast time, City+ may become
your new favorite roast level."
This is the first time I have heard it explained in quite this way and I now
have a much better understanding.  I know this wasn't my question, but I
thank you so much for the information!
Respectfully,
Eddie
On 8/11/06, Tom Ogren  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: miKe mcKoffee
<Snip>
<Snip>
Good decision IMO. Not to mention you'll have much better actual control of
your roaster voltage.
Yeah, this exact topic of extension cord usage to add resistance to reduce
voltage and associated dangers has been discussed numerous times over the
years. Personally I've never gone that route. I do happen to roast with an
extension cord, but not to reduce voltage, and it's a heavy 12gauge
construction extension cord plugged into dedicated 20A circuit. (Dedicated
except for the month of December when it's one of two 20A circuits I use for
outdoor Christmas display, then can't roast at night:-)
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

8) From: miKe mcKoffee
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Scjgb3
	Sent: Friday, August 11, 2006 1:34 PM
	
<Snip>
time for the roast i prefer is exactly 7min. fc+ which by 24hrs has a little
oil showing on my beans. After reading some advice from the group, i added a
100' ext. cord now my roasting time is 2.30 to 6min. longer depending on the
bean. 
<Snip>
	
Expect nothing and you won't be disappointed or biased looking for a
particular taste and just let it be a surprise! Best thing you can do is
roast the same bean both methods and let your taster decide the difference. 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

9) From: Michael Wascher
"... It seems that the electrical current available to my popper is reduced,
thus lengthening my roasts. ..." The only way this would "reduce current" to
your popper is if you popped the breaker. The two devices are in parallel at
the end of a line.
Power = VI = V^2/R = I^2R
There's a voltage source that is stable (relatively, over a short term). It
connects to you over wires that have some resistance, these wires have a
voltage drop. What you see at the other end, where you plug your stuff in,
is the source voltage minus the voltage drop over the intervening lines.
The voltage drop across the wires is IR, the current through the wires time
the resistance of the wires.
When you add the fan the current increases (current is now the sum of the
popper's and the fan's currents). Bigger I, bigger Vdrop (IR), less voltage
across both the fan & the popper, so less power (reduced by the square of
the voltage drop).
When you add an extension cord, you are increasing the resistance in the
wires between the voltage source and the popper. Si Bigger R, bigger IR,
more voltage drop across the wires, and again less voltage across the
popper. Again, less power.
On 8/11/06, Tom Ogren  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce


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