HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee Injuries (21 msgs / 575 lines)
1) From: Dan Kellgren
I suffered my first serious injury as a seeker of fine coffee last week.
And as I heal, I'm thinking that many of you might have an injury story to
share.  Anyone care to weigh in with their story of roasting or coffee
preparing related injury?
Mine is simple but painful.  I always French press.  So I prepared my
grounds in my single serve stainless French press pot.  I boiled my water to
the just over 200 degrees mark and poured it in the pot, covering the
wonderfully fresh grounds of my newly roasted Kenya AA.  As I pulled the
stove pot away, I bumped the coffee pot, which is rather top heavy and
having not put the top on yet, spilled it all over my left hand, burning it
quite severely.  Turns out, 200 degree water on the top of your hand really
hurts!
The funny part is, I was more concerned with wasting a good pot of brew at
first than I was at seeking first aid (hey - priorities, right?)!
Well, I'm about all healed now as my skin is returning to normal, bit it WAS
kind of fun to claim some "battle scars" for a few weeks.
I'm sure you've got much better stories out there... anyone?

2) From: Leo Zick
are you at a really high elevation?  sounds like you had another 12  
degrees or so on the
boiling thing :p
advantage to a tea loving wife is her purchase of an electric kettle.   
boils SO much
faster, and its safe for us danger prone people.. at least it wasnt  
too bad, it could
have been boiling water! lol :)
Quoting Dan Kellgren :
<Snip>
to
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t
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y
<Snip>
AS
<Snip>

3) From: Derek Bradford
Won't say it's better, but last year while finishing a roaster I
snagged an edge of jagged metal.  The chunk of skin left on the
roaster had a solid layer of fat attached, and I may well have seen
bone at the bottom of the hole left on my finger.  Seeing your own fat
is never comforting...
On 8/14/06, Dan Kellgren  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
The Uglyroast 3! Coffee Roaster.  ...Now 85% less ugly!http://uglyroast.atspace.com

4) From: Dan Kellgren
Oh man!  That's a nasty visual!
On 8/14/06, Derek Bradford  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Bob Brashear
Dan Kellgren wrote:
<Snip>
Dan,
Had a similar experience. When I began using the French Press pushed a 
little to hard on the plunger. The coffee "burped" and I got a nasty 
second degree burn on my right hand. Blisters and all.
Bob Brashear

6) From: Myron J
The "FUNNY PART"??
What is so "funny" about worrying about your brew..
The fact that the pain for your lost coffee blunted the physical pain you 
were suffering at the time is not funny, but a sign that you are worthy of a 
heap of CSA points.
I am afraid that I am not an active enough member to grant them to 
you...(But, I would give you 300 points...60 [beans per cup] x 5 [fingers on 
your burnt hand])
Wear you scar in honor!
best,
myron
Myron Joshua
Kibbutz Kfar Etzion
90912
Israel
+972-(0)2-9935 178

7) From: Sandy Andina
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Got two.
Back when I got my first steam toy (a cast-aluminum Vesuviana, which  
I thought was more authentic than those $50 Krups and Rotel jobs  
because it was Italian and looked seriously "industriale"), I  
accidentally brushed up against its hot metal surface. Had a second- 
degree burn and had to wear a Vaseline dressing for a week.
In 1995, I rented a flat for a week for our family's Paris vacation,  
and brought along my own coffee and paper filters.  The kitchen came  
equipped with a teakettle, pourover Melitta cone and one of those  
hotel thermal carafes. I set the filled filter cone atop the carafe  
and poured the boiling water. Unfortunately, the cone did not fit  
levelly and securely atop the carafe, and the first splash of water  
caused the cone to capsize--right on to my wrist. Yeeeowch!!! I went  
downstairs to the pharmacy located next door, and the pharmacist  
chose an herbal/antibiotic ointment, and applied it and a large  
wraparound bandage to my wrist.  The ointment had a mild anesthetic  
in it, so the pain disappeared fairly quickly.  Thus, we were able to  
resume our sightseeing for the day. However, I could not understand  
why people kept looking at us and casting pitying glances my  
way....until my husband pointed out that the bandage was in the same  
place as it would have been had I attempted to slit my wrist.
On Aug 14, 2006, at 8:00 AM, Dan Kellgren wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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Got two.
Back when I got my first = steam toy (a cast-aluminum Vesuviana, which I thought was more authentic = than those $50 Krups and Rotel jobs because it was Italian and looked = seriously "industriale"), I accidentally brushed up against its hot = metal surface. Had a second-degree burn and had to wear a Vaseline = dressing for a week.
In 1995, I rented a flat = for a week for our family's Paris vacation, and brought along my own = coffee and paper filters.  The kitchen came equipped with a teakettle, = pourover Melitta cone and one of those hotel thermal carafes. I set the = filled filter cone atop the carafe and poured the boiling water. = Unfortunately, the cone did not fit levelly and securely atop the = carafe, and the first splash of water caused the cone to capsize--right = on to my wrist. Yeeeowch!!! I went downstairs to the pharmacy located = next door, and the pharmacist chose an herbal/antibiotic ointment, and = applied it and a large wraparound bandage to my wrist.  The ointment = had a mild anesthetic in it, so the pain disappeared fairly quickly.  = Thus, we were able to resume our sightseeing for the day. However, I = could not understand why people kept looking at us and casting pitying = glances my way....until my husband pointed out that the bandage was in = the same place as it would have been had I attempted to slit my = wrist.   On Aug 14, 2006, at 8:00 AM, Dan Kellgren = wrote:
I suffered my first serious injury as a seeker = of fine coffee last week.  And as I heal, I'm thinking that many of = you might have an injury story to share.  Anyone care to weigh in with = their story of roasting or coffee preparing related injury? =   Mine is simple but painful.  I always French = press.  So I prepared my grounds in my single serve stainless French = press pot.  I boiled my water to the just over 200 degrees mark and = poured it in the pot, covering the wonderfully fresh grounds of my newly = roasted Kenya AA.  As I pulled the stove pot away, I bumped the coffee = pot, which is rather top heavy and having not put the top on yet, = spilled it all over my left hand, burning it quite severely.  Turns = out, 200 degree water on the top of your hand really hurts! =   The funny part is, I was more concerned with wasting = a good pot of brew at first than I was at seeking first aid (hey - = priorities, right?)!   Well, I'm about all = healed now as my skin is returning to normal, bit it WAS kind of fun to = claim some "battle scars" for a few weeks.   I'm = sure you've got much better stories out there... = anyone? = = --Apple-Mail-30--966595798--

8) From: Aaron
Dereck Writes:
Seeing your own fat is never comforting...
========
Which is EXACTLY why I never try to look at my feet :)
Ok, im going back over by my dish now.
Aaron

9) From: Alchemist John
Sure, I will toss my experience in.
I roast in a drum built of a beautiful diamond cross hatch 
pattern.  Suffice it to say, roasting temperatures are sufficient to 
cause a brand :O
It is mostly healed now, but for about a month there, I was sporting 
a beautiful 1" x 1/2" burn, one edge from the edge of the drum, and 
the rest from the diamond.  I am oddly sad to say, only the edge scar 
is there.  The cross hatching was too fine to remain.
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXXX
  XXXXXXXXXXX
is now just
Sigh....
At 06:00 8/14/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

10) From: Brett Mason
When my 15 year old son was 8 months, he had a 22oz styrofoam cup of coffee
tipped on him at a restaurant.  Took only a few seconds to get to him, but
he had 2nd degree burns all over his chest, and spent 6 days in the
neo-natal intensive care burn unit at UCI Medical Center.  He has had no
lasting internal injuries, but a faint large scar covers his whole chest.
##< Restaurant has taken care of his college for him, and thankfully he
does not have lasting internal injuries.  He has grown up into a courageous
young man, with great years ahead...
Oh, and I felt some hot steam off my DIVA this morning...
Brett
On 8/15/06, Alchemist John  wrote:
>Snip#####
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman

11) From: Michael Wascher
I haven't been the recipient of major coffee related injuries, but manmy
years ago I did accidentally instigate coffee related injuries, which were
thankfully minor.
I had been working in Fairborn, Ohio temporarily. I rented a truck to move
nearly a year's accumulation of stuff back to Akron, Ohio. There was a
minimum rental period so I helped friends move too. After we were done
moving, Butch bought everybody lunch at a nearby restaurant. The wait staff
was several young ladies.
One had a pot of coffee, and I motioned for a refill.
She didn't, the manager called her name, she stopped, turned to him, then to
me.
At this moment another waitress squatted down to get something from a low
cupboard.
... and a third waitress came through the door from the kitchen.
The swinging door struck the first waitress.
Her coffee pot tipped.
Coffee poured into the back of the waitress #2's pants.
... who stood up rapidly, striking her head on the cupboard.
This startled the other two waitresses,
the one holding the coffee pot dropped it,
the one coming through the door dropped the desert tray.
Fortunately, no further injury, the coffee wasn't hot enough to cause a
major burn, the bump on the head was minor.
At the end of this Rube Goldberg moment I put my cup down and tried to be as
innocuous as possible.
They did serve a fresh pot of coffee with our desert. As we ate desert the
three of them glared at me.
And we gave them an extra nice tip.
--MikeW
On 8/15/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce

12) From: Justin Marquez
On 8/15/06, Michael Wascher  wrote:
<Snip>
The "Three Stoogettes" ??
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)

13) From: Scot Murphy
On Aug 15, 2006, at 8:11 AM, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
This is why I get riled up when people joke about that poor woman who  
spilled McDonald's coffee in her lap and sued the place. In truth,  
she had to get skin grafts to repair the damage, and spent much time  
in the hospital. Scalding water is nothing to laugh about when you  
get hit with it. I know this from when I was a youngster working in  
restaurants and I pulled a pan out of an oven. It slipped and water  
splashed all over my right leg. Looking back on it, I should have  
gone to the hospital, but I settled for sticking my leg in a bucket  
full of ice water until I was okay to work again. Ahh, the old days  
when you took all kinds of abuse for fear of losing your job! It's SO  
different now.
Scot "this doesn't compare to seeing fat and bone in your finger,  
though" Murphy

14) From: Scott Marquardt
Nothing major on my part. Using an Aeropress inverted does tend to court
disaster, however. If the thing doesn't tip in half from being
over-extended, well, this DID happen to me: with the press inverted and the
grind stirred, I was putting the cap on to press when the polyester round
fell partway into the slurry. I didn't spot this through the cap's holes,
and I started to press (inverted). Of course, the entire slurry came up
through the holes and flowed all over the place (it didn't squirt upward --
a fortunate thing about this method). A quick shake of the hands was enough
to save me, but a thick slurry at 190 or so is definitely more hazardous
than a thin film of water at the same temperature.
I also have an electrical hazard with my old Variac, for roasting. That
one's actually a bit serious, and I'll be fixing it this week. I do NOT want
someone else in this forum to have to feed this thread with sad comments
about the late Scott Marquardt.    ;-)
- Scott

15) From: raymanowen
"Seeing your own fat..."
Don't remind me- I'm the Original Michelin Man, as my camera-laden daughters
are quick to remind me!
Vince, my metal-fabricating friend, usually wore his leather welding gloves
when cutting and fabricating sheet metal.
I can only imagine the safety steps RLK takes when putting the roasting
drums together. I've been trying to visualize outsmarting my own clumsiness
when unloading it at the end of the roast.
My masonite mock-up will become Durock lined with sheet metal in due time.
Meanwhile, I'm having too much fun and success with a Wagner HG and Kitchen
Aid mixer bowl.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Decaf deactivates Viagra and causes flatulence-

16) From: Brett Mason
Yeps...
McDonald's had already had three lawsuits about their temperature, and the
settlement from one of those was that they would lower the temperature of
the served coffee to 165.  Well, the old lady spilled 190 degree coffee.
The penalty was because they had not implemented what they had agreed to
implement.  The lady's damages were later reduced as well, removing much of
the punitive damages.
My son's were caused because although safely seated in a high chair, while
his mom had gone about 20' to the register to pay, a waitress left the tall
cup in front of the baby.  It was atrocious.  Most babies are not well
versed in safety precautions.  Turned out the waitresses in this national
chain also were not trained. And this particular restaurant was a "training"
restaurant.
We sued to cover medical - frankly our insurance required us to sue as we
had not caused the damages to our son.  The lawsuit covered immediate
medical, and monies for later in life in case additional medical might be
rtequired.  Didn't cover my wife's breakdown, my losing my job, or the
stress we went through...
Brett
On 8/15/06, Scot Murphy  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Regards,
Brett Mason
HomeRoast
   Zassman

17) From: Michael Guterman
raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
Damn!!  I knew there was a problem.
Michael

18) From: Aaron
It was written.
This is why I get riled up when people joke about that poor woman who  
spilled McDonald's coffee in her lap and sued the place.
=======
No... burns are not funny but in this case, the mental midget  who drove 
like an idiot played a major part in the creation of this accident, yet 
folks conveniently leave that part out of the scenario when retelling 
it..  I guess it diminishes the victim status or something when 
something gone wrong is partially ones own fault.  God forbid someone 
say yes it was partially my fault too that something happened to me.... 
can't get as much money that way.
You are correct though, scalding water does create more burns than 
regular hot water.  Water near boiling (umm yah I guess you could call 
it scalding) is the worst as what steam is there, is dumping all the 
latent energy into you as it condenses back into water upon cooling on 
your flesh.
For all practical purposes, anything over 130 degrees F is considered a 
severe scald hazard and should be treated accordingly.  This is why most 
appliances that heat water, like your water heater for example warn you 
not to turn the temperature higher than that.
I havent seen bone in any personal injury but have had my arm laid open 
by a scared iguana I was untangling from cloth who decided to grab onto 
my arm.  Do tendons and muscle tissue along with the fat count?  or will 
the 36 stitches make up for it.
However since this is the coffee injuries topic, I guess the worst I did 
to myself is making espresso with my steam toy before I knew better 
about coffee, and was in a hurry and undid the ground holder without 
venting the residual steam pressure off the thing first.  Whoosh, hot 
steam and grounds all over my hand.... ouch... blister city.  not to 
mention messy too.
Aaron

19) From: Derek Bradford
Do you know what?  I use mid-forearm length leather gloves while I'm
doing all my metal work.  Religiously.  Mostly.  The incidident
happened at the end of a day, after I was finished working.  I was
just moving the roaster (truth be told, I was showing it off), and I
got caught on an edge I'd been meaning to deal with all day, but had
forgotten about.  There's got to be a lesson in pride there
somewhere...  ;)
On 8/16/06, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
The Uglyroast 3! Coffee Roaster.  ...Now 85% less ugly!http://uglyroast.atspace.com

20) From: Derek Bradford
On 8/16/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
Umm...  Yeah.  I'll give you that.  Good lord...tendons and muscle.  Ouch.
-- 
The Uglyroast 3! Coffee Roaster.  ...Now 85% less ugly!http://uglyroast.atspace.com

21) From: fjm
Aaron wrote:
<Snip>
If you are talking about the woman in the McDonald's case, the car was 
stopped when this her accident happened and she wasn't driving the car.  fjm


HomeRoast Digest