HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: HTML suggestion (9 msgs / 190 lines)
1) From: Wesley Simon
Tom,
One thing that would help new things show up on the web site would be to add
this to your HTML headers:
This should tell the browser to read it again off the site rather than out
of the cache.  When I load this page:http://www.sweetmarias.com/#whats_newI don't see anything new unless I reload the page.  The same thing happens
with the coffee description pages.
Wes

2) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
You should be able to set your own browser prefs to update pages each
SESSION or each TIME the page is visited. Whether this actually works with
every site, I do not know. If you are a heavy user or have a small cache,
the data needed to rebuild the page may be deleted from your cache anyway,
so it will be requested from the site. Apologies if you already know this.
--

3) From: Michael Wascher
I have an issue with web pages at work were I disseminate documentation &
test results. I've tried the html you recommend, but folks still are having
problems.
On 8/14/06, Ken Mary  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce

4) From: Wesley Simon
A cache is a wonderful thing.  Anytime a page can be loaded out of cache, it
should be to save time and bandwidth.  When I load up www.google.com, I
really don't need it to read it from the server, the cache is quick and the
information I receive is 100% correct.  When I read news.google.com or
www.cnn.com, I don't want those read out of cache: who likes to read
yesterday's news?  I don't want to set my browser to handle www.google.comand
news.google.com in the same manner either.  That's why
news.google.comemploys the no-cache directive which I mention and
www.google.com does not.  The two news sites I mention also employ the
"refresh" directive that will make the browser automatically reload the web
page after some amount of time has passed.  In the case of sweetmarias.com,
this method does not make sense as the updates are in terms of days rather
than minutes like these other sites.
I don't recommend changing cache settings unless you're absolutely sure you
need to do it.  The author of the page should understand how his visitors
use the web site and adjust the cache directives accordingly.
Wes
On 8/14/06, Ken Mary  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Wesley Simon
Helping you with a work issue is beyond the scope of the suggestion I
offered Tom.  You can contact me offlist if you want to hire me as a
consultant.
Wes
On 8/14/06, Michael Wascher  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Spencer Thomas
Even better is to set a Max-Age header, maybe 24 hours, assuming it's not
updated any more often than once per day.
On 8/14/06, Wesley Simon < gm.wesley> wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
=Spencer in Ann Arbor
My Unitarian Jihad http://tinyurl.com/6valr)Name is:
Sibling Dagger of Mild Reason
What are you?http://homepage.mac.com/whump/ujname.html

7) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
That's a good tip ... i mean, there are good reasons for caches and 
usually it serves its purpose. I had played with an html refresh 
command on our main page a few years back and I basically uploaded 
the new page and went away. After a few hours I found out our site 
was down! The ISP at the time had pulled the plug having seen a huge 
surge in bandwidth.  (i am still not sure exactly how or why this 
happened - seems to me it was a reload command on a particular image, 
not on the whole page, but somehow this was the effect). Anyway, I 
quickly undid my changes and got them to allow access to our IP 
again. Well, thanks for the HTML info.  - learns something here every 
day, even in the OT topics. (and this really wasnt even OT).
This morning my home roast list mailbox was overfilled and I had to 
archive messages. I saw an "OT" message titled "OT Yarn Counters". 
Now THAT is Off Topic! It was actually amusing to see how off topic 
this list can get, not our problem with unlabeled OT, but purposeful 
OT topics where fellow homeroasters need help with something and 
don't know who else to ask. Yarn Counters? MIME Servers? Cow Tipping? 
Electrical Problems? Flame Wars? BBQ Tips? It's just funny to look at 
OT in a new light.
Tom
A cache is a wonderful thing.  Anytime a page can be loaded out of 
cache, it should be to save time and bandwidth.  When I load up 
www.google.com, I really don't need it to read 
it from the server, the cache is quick and the information I receive 
is 100% correct.  When I read news.google.com 
or www.cnn.com, I don't want those read out of 
cache: who likes to read yesterday's news?  I don't want to set my 
browser to handle  www.google.com and 
news.google.com in the same manner either. 
That's why news.google.com employs the 
no-cache directive which I mention and  
www.google.com does not.  The two news sites I mention also employ 
the "refresh" directive that will make the browser automatically 
reload the web page after some amount of time has passed.  In the 
case of  sweetmarias.com, this method does 
not make sense as the updates are in terms of days rather than 
minutes like these other sites. 
I don't recommend changing cache settings unless you're absolutely 
sure you need to do it.  The author of the page should understand how 
his visitors use the web site and adjust the cache directives 
accordingly.
Wes
On 8/14/06, Ken Mary <kdmary> wrote:
<Snip>
You should be able to set your own browser prefs to update pages each
SESSION or each TIME the page is visited. Whether this actually works with
every site, I do not know. If you are a heavy user or have a small cache,
the data needed to rebuild the page may be deleted from your cache anyway,
so it will be requested from the site. Apologies if you already know this.
--

8) From: Mike Chester
 It was actually amusing to see how off topic
<Snip>
If it makes you feel any better, we have discussed home roasted coffee and 
mentioned SM several times on the BBQ list.  That is where I first learned 
about it and was directed to your site.
Mike

9) From: Michael Wascher
LOL!
I meant that a couple of years ago when I first set it up I tried that ...
not just now.
On 8/14/06, Wesley Simon  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"There is nothing new under the sun but there are lots of old things we
don't know." --  Ambrose Bierce


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