HomeRoast Digest


Topic: IR2 roasting/ tasting log sheets (4 msgs / 118 lines)
1) From: Vicki Smith
After messing with an Excel spreadsheet and finding that keeping my 
roasting log on my computer was a PITA, I decided to make roasting and 
tasting sheets that I could print out, punch, and keep in a notebook.
I'm sure they will be completely useless to experts, but for new IR2 
folks, they might be handy. If nothing else, when you see how they could 
be improved or modified, they might be a starting point, even if you 
roast in some other way.
For example, I never use more than three coffees, at this point, when I 
blend, and folks who use more than that will want to add another row or 
two .
In any case the Word files can be downloaded from:
www.4cats2much.com/coffee/log.doc
I also have sheets for IR2 profiles (including a sheet with the IR2 
presets all ready entered)
www.4cats2much.com/coffee/profiles.doc
Vicki

2) From: David T. Borton
Vicki,
Thanks for the I-Roast logs.  I copied them from the net this morning.  
[My I-Roast 2 runs extremely hot compared to others so I always need to 
lower the staged-temps that others suggest].
I incorporate the stage settings right into the first sheet, thereby 
having one record, not two.  Your notes are more inclusive than mine, 
particularly on the 1/2 minute temps.
Three things I do add to most of my notes is:
First:
Sourced from:
Arrival date at source:  [S/M includes this; others don't]
My purchase date:
You may have included that and I missed it.
Second: I usually do some reading on the country from which they come.  
I love to learn and taking 15-30 minutes to read about aspects of the 
country is always a delight for me.  I spend a bit of time pouring over 
relief maps to familiarize myself with the country.  I write down 
"factoids" or pieces of information that I wasn't aware of.  All that 
becomes part of the log.
Third:  Blending.  I usually toss in some notes if I blend with the 
coffee on what worked/what didn't.  I also throw in some names, i.e., 
Alley Cat, for a blend - my blend of a 50/50 Asian blended with a Costa 
Rican.  Just a fun piece.   One blend that always gets appreciated:  
Coffee of a 1,000 Hands.  This is the 'left-overs,' the floor sweepings, 
etc.  When I get 140g, I roast it up.  The 1,000 Hands is an 
acknowledgement/remembrance of all the peoples of the world that take 
part in bringing this delight to our home.  May I never forget them.
DB

3) From: Vicki Smith
I'm betting we all want slightly different things. I keep copies of my 
coffee receipts in my roasting log and I print out the SM description of 
each bean I order when I order it--also kept in my log. I find it useful 
to have the description when I go to roast--and dawg knows the beans 
disappear so fast, that if I don't have the descriptions saved, I am out 
of luck.
Yeah, I use the "tasting sheet", which has room for 3 different beans, 
to record my blends, though honestly, since I buy at most 10 pounds of a 
particular bean, I don't get to repeat the exact same thing all that 
often before one of the component beans are just plain gone. It does 
help me anyway since I can sorta figure out how to make substitutions as 
time goes on.
You do realize that I am such a noob that most of this is still vaguely 
hit or miss ;).
I'm glad you found them somewhat useful. As I said, they are mebbe a 
place to start for some folks, and one of the joys of computers is that 
we can modify and tinker until they are just what we want. And when we 
begin to want something different, we can tinker again.
v
David T. Borton wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Vicki Smith
PS: I have separate profile sheets for the profiles I program into the 
iRoast2. It is easier for me to put "profile 3" onto the roasting sheet 
than it is for me to write it down each time--and besides, it was the 
only way I could remember what I set as a profile.
vicki
David T. Borton wrote:


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