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Topic: 1st heat gun / bread machine roast (11 msgs / 260 lines)
1) From: Vicki Smith
What can I say, I had this urge. I also had all the tools. And waaay too 
much time on my hand--though the roast took only 12 minutes, including 
the cooling.http://tinyurl.com/zbrlmI'm pretty sure I will do this whenever I have a need for more than the 
130-150 grams I can get using my IR2, as long as the weather is decent.
It's not the most even roast I have ever seen, but I am pretty sure that 
is my fault. I need to figure out how to handle the heat gun. The bread 
machine stirs really, really well. I have no doubt it could handle more 
than the 3/4 pound of green I roasted today.
vicki

2) From: Brian Kamnetz
Vicki,
Am I correct in understanding you to say that you did not modify the
bread machine in any way?
I like your cooling aparatus!
I have a small, inexpensive ($25 US) Milwaukee heat gun, and an
industrial strength (draws 14.5 amps) heat gun, and I noticed that the
little heat gun doesn't roast as evenly as the big one.
Thanks,
brian
On 8/17/06, Vicki Smith  wrote:
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3) From: Vicki Smith
Nope, no mod at all. I set it on the dough setting, and let it rip. It 
starts on a slower mixing speed for about 2 minutes, and then mixes the 
beans quite quickly, with a 5 second stop after each minute. 3/4 of a 
pound of greens did not get close to covering the mixing blades, so I am 
quite sure I could roast more than that.
The unevenness was, in part, an artifact of it being outside. The 
sunlight was coming through the branches of the tree overhead. When I 
took it inside, the roast looked pretty darn even. I culled perhaps a 
dozen underdone beans, fewer than I culled, by weight, when I roasted 
this same bean inside in my IR2.
If I had to guess, I would say that 95% of the beans were at what I 
would call a city+, and 5% were full city. Other than the few I culled, 
there really weren't any beans that were lighter than that.
I forgot to turn the heat gun down to the lower temp when it hit first 
crack. I bet I could get a better/more even roast--with more time 
between first and second crack, if I did that. I turned the beans out 
when the smoke changed a bit and I expected 2nd crack to start any second.
vicki
Brian Kamnetz wrote:
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4) From: Captain CowPie
Vicki,
Glad to hear you liked the bread machine / heat gun method. I have been usi=
ng it for some time and have really grown to like it. I do all of my roasts=
 this way now. I have done up to 1.5 pounds with ease, but my bread machine=
 has two mixers and is shaped more like a loaf of bread.
But my roasts always turn out very evenly. I do the same thing as you and p=
ut it on the dough cycle, and the beans are moved around very quickly. The =
nice thing is, like the  dog bowl method, you get a great amount of control=
 over the roast.
I am experimenting with roast times now to see what changes it will make.
Nice job on the website,
Vince
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5) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 8/17/06, Vicki Smith  wrote:
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Regulating heat and reading the smoke is something I want to learn
more about. One can confound the next, it seems. After 1st crack I
look for the smoke, but if a long time goes by and nothing seems to be
happening, I am temped to move the heat gun closer, and then all of a
sudden the smoke appears. So, I find myself wondering, is that a stage
of the roast, or is it smoking because I cranked the heat?
All in all, Vickie, sounds like a very good outcome for the first time
with a bread machine!
I loved your blog too!
Brian

6) From: Vicki Smith
Yes, I was very pleased with my first attempt at roasting this way. It 
was also a real pleasure to hear the beans crack so clearly. With the 
IR2, I never really get a sense that first crack has a beginning, middle 
and end. I get a few pops, fairly widely spaced, and that's that.
I don't really like many beans roasted dark, but I might just set up a 
roast and let it go well into second crack just to get a sense of what 
that sounds like. You really have to listen hard with the IR2.
Thanks for the blog comment. I actually made the templates for the 
motime blogging site, so when I wanted to do a coffee themed weblog, it 
was easy. I build websites for (part of) my living.
It looks lousy on some monitors, browns can be that way, it's the issue 
of how brown is created. CRT monitors are fine--the new hi-tech flat 
screens though . And whilst I can adjust my own monitors to 
compensate, 99% of people out there can't or don't.
When I have some extra time, I'll do something to improve it.
vicki
Brian Kamnetz wrote:
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7) From: Lynne
I JUST saw a bread making machine at our local thrift shop... wonder if 
it's still there...
Oh the temptation - heat gun is calling me... danger... danger..
L. ;-)
Vicki Smith wrote:
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8) From: Michael Wade
Vicki,
Have a care when letting the beans go well into second.  My first experience 
with a "rolling second" was like a runaway reactor!  It was hard to get it 
stopped.  If you have an efficient cooling setup it shouldn't be a problem, 
but I was just setting the heat gun to "cool" or pouring the beans back and 
forth between collanders at the time.
It's kind of exhilarating to pour hot, smoking, crackling beans back and 
forth between containers...
Michael

9) From: David Yeager
At 05:25 PM 8/17/2006, you wrote:
 >What can I say, I had this urge. I also had all the tools. And waaay too
 >much time on my hand--though the roast took only 12 minutes, including
 >the cooling.
 >
 >http://tinyurl.com/zbrlm >
 >I'm pretty sure I will do this whenever I have a need for more than the
 >130-150 grams I can get using my IR2, as long as the weather is decent.
 >
 >It's not the most even roast I have ever seen, but I am pretty sure that
 >is my fault. I need to figure out how to handle the heat gun. The bread
 >machine stirs really, really well. I have no doubt it could handle more
 >than the 3/4 pound of green I roasted today.
 >
 >vicki
Very nice work, vicki!  I enjoyed your story over at your blog.
Before electrically modifying my breadmachine(s), I found that there 
were different native programs that delivered varying speeds and 
patterns of stirring.  One machine had a slow pulsing motion for two 
minutes, followed by 13-minutes of constant stirring.  It turned out 
to be the 13-minute factor that was the limit to roast size.  The 
heat gun itself could manage up to two pounds!
Good luck.  Keep us posted.
David Y
Atlanta

10) From: Vicki Smith
Chances are I won't want to roast very dark, and a pound at a time 
should be just fine. Using the dough cycle on my machine, I could stop 
and right again restart the cycle if I wanted to add more time in, for 
example, roast for 5 minutes (which would be well before first crack, 
briefly stop (no real pause) and restart, which would give me the full 
cycle plus 5.
I guess Ill know more as I play. Mostly, it is just the two of us 
drinking coffee, so unless I am roasting for gifts, I don't imagine I 
will use this method all that much. Too bad December roasting has to be 
indoors here, roasting outside with the bread machine sure would make 
giving beanie goodness as Xmas gifts into a great possibility.
v
David Yeager wrote:
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11) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 8/18/06, Vicki Smith  wrote:
Too bad December roasting has to be
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Another reason to look forward to spring!!!!!
Brian


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