HomeRoast Digest


Topic: POLL roaster onboard the ship (16 msgs / 881 lines)
1) From: Dennis & Marjorie True
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi all,
            I have been absorbing all the info as of late and I was 
wondering if the group would mind a quick poll on what roaster I should 
get for use onboard the ship for my deployment.
My criteria are:
Ease of use: (I want something that won't have a really hard learning curve)
Cleanliness: (can't have chaff getting into the equipment)
Portability/size: (onboard ship there is limited space and I will have 
to carry it to my roasting location and back.)
Roast size: I am roasting for myself primally I was planning on doing 
about 2/3 roasts per week.
Economical: (after all the navy doesn't pay you a Donald trump salary)
Sound: (I don't want to wake up the Captain if I roast at 3AM)
Smoke reduction: (having the fire party called every time I do a roast 
would really cut back on my supply of beans fast)
Power: We have 115V onboard
My Coffee will be Bodum ceramic burr Ground with the grinder I just got 
and Aeropress made. With the occasional drip pot if I am feeling REALLY 
generous to my shipmates.
Whit all this in mind I was considering the FRESHROAST PLUS 8.
But I really would like to hear the comments from the experts.
Thanks for everything!
Dennis

2) From: Eddie Dove
Dennis,
I cannot comment on the Freshroast, but I have a Zach & Dani's and that
would fit the bill based on your list of requirements.  I use it in the
house (actually, I am using it right now), and it has some mechanism inside
to eliminate most, if not all of the smoke.  I got it from Sweet Maria's for
$159.00 and that included the sample packs of beans too.  I would be more
than glad to discuss it with you if you wish.
Thank you for serving.
Respectfully,
Eddie Dove
On 8/18/06, Dennis & Marjorie True  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
I'd agree Z&D the only one that comes close to meeting your requirements. 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Eddie Dove
	Sent: Friday, August 18, 2006 3:33 PM
	
	Dennis,
	
	I cannot comment on the Freshroast, but I have a Zach & Dani's and
that would fit the bill based on your list of requirements.  I use it in the
house (actually, I am using it right now), and it has some mechanism inside
to eliminate most, if not all of the smoke.  I got it from Sweet Maria's for
$159.00 and that included the sample packs of beans too.  I would be more
than glad to discuss it with you if you wish. 
	
	Thank you for serving.
	
	Respectfully,
	
	Eddie Dove
	
	On 8/18/06, Dennis & Marjorie True  > wrote: 
		Hi all,
		            I have been absorbing all the info as of late
and I was wondering if the group would mind a quick poll on what roaster I
should get for use onboard the ship for my deployment.
		My criteria are:
		Ease of use: (I want something that won't have a really hard
learning curve)
		Cleanliness: (can't have chaff getting into the equipment) 
		Portability/size: (onboard ship there is limited space and I
will have to carry it to my roasting location and back.)
		Roast size: I am roasting for myself primally I was planning
on doing about 2/3 roasts per week.
		Economical: (after all the navy doesn't pay you a Donald
trump salary)
		Sound: (I don't want to wake up the Captain if I roast at
3AM )
		Smoke reduction: (having the fire party called every time I
do a roast would really cut back on my supply of beans fast)
		Power: We have 115V onboard 
		My Coffee will be Bodum ceramic burr Ground with the grinder
I just got and Aeropress made. With the occasional drip pot if I am feeling
REALLY generous to my shipmates.
		Whit all this in mind I was considering the FRESHROAST PLUS
8. 
		But I really would like to hear the comments from the
experts.
		Thanks for everything!
		Dennis

4) From: Barry Luterman
The Z&D has a catalytic converter built in and is almost smoke free. However 
the roasts are not as good as other roasters. There are some modifications 
on several websites that really improve the quality of the roasts and still 
retain the almost smokeless feature of the machine

5) From: Eddie Dove
Barry,
Are you referring to the fact that everything says they are so slow?  or
something else?
Eddie
On 8/18/06, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
They don't seem to put out enough heat and the ramp up is too slow. =
Beans tend to come out like stew made in a crock pot rather than a stew =
made from scratch.

7) From: raymanowen
Dennis-
If I were to use different equipment of any kind than I normally use, I'd
have to drift through the Learnin' Curve a few more times.
I'd recommend the Z&D roaster. It's the only one I see that has some sort of
catalytic converter, and might help with your clandestine roastery.
Is there a MARS amateur radio station aboard ship? If so, these hams could
give you tips on power problems you might encounter. Or, do you know any
radar guys?
Ike's power should be pretty stable if the contractors didn't build in some
surprises during the last big dry dock/ refitting. You couldn't be far from
the ship's alternators at any location.
Cheers and thanks -RayO, aka Opa!
Remember, you always have the upper hand with your "bargaining chips-
beans!"
On 8/18/06, Dennis & Marjorie True  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Wichita WurliTzer

8) From: Eddie Dove
I just got mine about a month ago.  I am not sure if they did some rework to
the roaster or if maybe I got a rogue, but this is certainly not the case
with mine.  One caveat is that I always have 120 volts at my outlets.  The
first batch I roasted really shocked me because it was at a French roast in
no time at all.  Thus far, I have tried using up to a 100ft extension cord
(dropped to 112.8 volts) and I still could not get it to roast as slowly as
the manual and the tip sheet suggest for roasting times.  It does produce
great coffee though ... the Timor FTO Peaberry made the best French roasted
coffee I ever had.
Eddie
On 8/18/06, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
What I mean by the stew analogy is the highs get lost and the lows get =
accentuated. If you like a bright coffee like Kenya or even to get the =
fruit from some coffees it will have to be modified. It's a good starter =
roaster but one you will outgrow rapidly. I have one in the closet and I =
am sure most list members have one tucked away also.

10) From: raymanowen
Also, if you have to capture all the chaff, roast under mosquito netting. On
the poop. -ro
115v, 60Hz or 400?
On 8/18/06, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Perhaps they have been improved. Mine is 4 years old,

12) From: Dennis & Marjorie True
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Mars is no longer carried I have a regular phone line if I need to call 
out... But I work with electronics for a living so I'm sure that either 
myself or a few of the other guys in the shop can work thru any power 
issues... and Like you said I have the upper hand I have the beans!!!!
60Hz at the outlets but I can plug into 440V 400Hz if I ever wanted 
to.... I have VERY Clean power on the ship and I'm not too wrried about 
power I do know of a few ways to get my hands on a power conditioner not 
quite the Variac you see on SM's but should handle any issues I have.....
Ok I am going to read up on the Z&D
raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Jerry Procopio
Hey Sailor, if you have time to roast 2 to 3 times a week, you're 
workload is too light! 
I don't know how smoke free the Gene Cafe is, but it would probably be 
my choice for shipboard use if it is relatively smoke free.  Maybe some 
GC users will pipe in on this.
JavaJerry (MCPO, USN Ret.)
RK Drum roasting in Chesapeake, VA
Dennis & Marjorie True wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Dennis & Marjorie True
I am sure the GC would be very nice but the cost is out of my price 
range for the time being....
Dennis
Jerry Procopio wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Steven Van Dyke
<Snip>
Well, *any* coffee roasting is going to give you smoke.  The Z&D's catalytic
converter is the only thing I know of to take care of that.  Remember, it's
not a bug, it's a feature.
That said, the GeneCafe has several advantages for your usage:
* Roast around 1/2lb at a time.
* *Very* quiet - one of our cats wouldn't stay in the sunroom while I
roasted with other roasters but doesn't mind the GC
* Chaff control is good - I usually get just a small amount when I take off
the chaff collector and when I do the 'final cool' of the beans (more below)
* The ability to adjust your settings on the fly should let you deal with
any voltage issues
Some disadvantages:
* Somewhat large for storage - literally about the size of a bread box
* You also need to carry the drum stand and the chaff collector along.
* You'll get some smoke but as noted that's a feature of coffee roasting
Of the roasters I have the most portable one is my CafeRoasto.  It's about
the size of a 2-liter soda bottle.  Roast about 150grams / roast.  However
it's *not* quiet just like most air roasters.  I believe it's also out of
production which could be a bigger issue.
If you can find a roasting area that's semi-outside it would be best.  You
*will* get some smoke with anything but the Z&D (and maybe some with it -
since I don't have one I don't know).  Even if you don't see the smoke
you'll smell it for the next several hours (as will others).  Odds are good
that there will be a small amount of 'free chaff' with any method you use.
Oh, that 'final cooling' I mentioned with the GeneCafe?  It stops its
cooling when the beans hit 140.  I like to get them down to 'room
temperature' before I put them away so I dump them into a large mesh
strainer and hold it in front of a fan while stirring them with my hands.
This not only cools them, it gets rid of any chaff that's still stuck to
them.  Of course it gets rid of it by blowing it 'downwind'.  You'd probably
want to either let the beans cool by themself or, if you use a strainer,
step outside and do a gentle 'toss / stirr'.
I think you'll want to have a 'roasting case' to carry everything.  That's
pretty much the only way you'll get to/from your roasting place in one trip.
Thinking about what I have involved in a roast it includes:
* Roaster, most of which have 'extra' bits for carrying (the FreshRoast you
have to carry as the three bits, at least with my old original model)
* Coffee to be roasted.  You can keep your stash and a scale or other
measuring device in your quarters but you have to take this roast with you.
* Something to put the roasted coffee in.  I use mason jars.  I carry my 'to
be roasted' coffee out in one of the jars I'll carry the roasted coffee back
in.
* A canning funnel.  These are *great* for transferring coffee (and other
stuff).  Nice big opening at the top, small canning jar sized opening at the
bottom.
* Large mesh strainer.  As noted, I use this for 'final cooling'.  You may
or may not need this.
* Fan.  Actually the fan lives in the sun room but it's good to have a fan
when you roast and you may have to carry yours.
* Big stirring spoon.  Depends on your roasting method but it's handy for
many of them
* Hot pad / oven mitt.  Once again, may not be needed but can be handy.
You could easily pick up an inexpensive piece of rolling luggage and mutate
it into a 'roasting case' by just adding some shipping foam and some
hot-melt glue.  I need to make myself something similar for taking my travel
coffee brewing set.  Keeps it nice and protects your stuff.
Your choice of the FreshRoast8 is probably a good one.  I started with the
original FreshRoast and it's a *great* starting roaster.  It's *very*
quiet - just about the easiest roaster I have for hearing the cracks.  Small
batch size but it's quick (and the 8 has a significantly larger batch size).
Small batches can be nice because you always have fresh coffee and can try
different ones easier.  Down side is you have to roast more often.  My
FreshRoast is a bit tricky to carry - the chaff collector wants to fall off
of the roast chamber and it pulls the chamber off with it when it does.
It's fine when it's sitting still but when you carry it....   Smaller batch
size == less smoke so that's good for you.  Good chaff control too.
Good luck and keep us informed!
Enjoy!
Steve :->

16) From: Steve Hay
On 8/18/06, Dennis & Marjorie True  wrote:
<Snip>
with the ungrounded electrical distribution systems on US Naval ships.  I
don't think there'd be a problem with most anything sold in the US.  I know
that they would perform some sort of electrical safety test on everything
brought aboard.  Should make sure any roaster you bring on would pass the
test.  Maybe some former EM on list knows what the test is.
The Z&D seems to be the best fit for your functional requirements.  You must
have more time than I did when underway.  After a 3 section watchbill,
upgrading quals, field day, training, PMS, and all of the other crud, I
barely had time for a good 6 a night.
Oh and walking to work uphill both ways was hard too just in case you were
wondering. :)
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."


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