HomeRoast Digest


Topic: A fine compliment (17 msgs / 489 lines)
1) From: Scott Marquardt
I do a farmer's market, as readers are probably aware. This weekend I had a
customer who'd missed a week. Two weeks earlier he'd taken a cup of Harrar.
He's a bit older than my 46 years, and seems a gent with some coffee
experience behind him. Anyway, he got a faraway look in his eyes when he
recounted something he said to his wife as they were driving from the market
and he was sipping the Harrar: "I think this is the best coffee I've had in
my life."
That was gratifying, but also humbling. This particular Harrar is a prize in
my stash -- perhaps my most prized ever. It's probably a hard bean to screw
up while roasting -- it's that good. That faraway look in his eyes? I think
I probably do that when speaking of this coffee as well; to drink it is an
almost mystical revelation.
Anyone else have "supernatural beans" they feel the same way about?
Market customers are clamoring for more Sumatra, too.
-- 
Scott

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Scott Marquardt
	Sent: Sunday, August 20, 2006 12:57 PM
<Snip>
Many of them...
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

3) From: Sandy Andina
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Aussie Mt. top--it is what JBM used to be for me as press or drip,  
and a beautifully balanced espresso shot.
On Aug 20, 2006, at 2:57 PM, Scott Marquardt wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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Aussie Mt. top--it is what JBM =
used to be for me as press or drip, and a beautifully balanced espresso =
shot.
On Aug 20, 2006, at 2:57 PM, Scott Marquardt =
wrote:
I do a farmer's market, as readers are probably = aware. This weekend I had a customer who'd missed a week. Two weeks = earlier he'd taken a cup of Harrar. He's a bit older than my 46 years, = and seems a gent with some coffee experience behind him. Anyway, he got = a faraway look in his eyes when he recounted something he said to his = wife as they were driving from the market and he was sipping the Harrar: = "I think this is the best coffee I've had in my life." =   That was gratifying, but also humbling. This = particular Harrar is a prize in my stash -- perhaps my most prized ever. = It's probably a hard bean to screw up while roasting -- it's that good. = That faraway look in his eyes? I think I probably do that when speaking = of this coffee as well; to drink it is an almost mystical revelation. =   Anyone else have "supernatural beans" they = feel the same way about?   Market customers are = clamoring for more Sumatra, too.
-- = Scott   = --Apple-Mail-99--441976032--

4) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
Speaking of Australian Mountain Top, that is one coffee that doesn't 
taste great when brewed in my Krups Moka Brew.
I love it in my Aeropress, but the Krups makes it taste boiled, or 
over-extracted, or something.
There are a few other coffees that act the same way, I can't remember 
what the others are.
Anyone understand that issue?
Dave S
Sandy Andina wrote:
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5) From: Vicki Smith
Try adjusting your grind, Dave. I have some beans that, at least on 
certain days, need to be ground a bit coarser for the KMB. I grind 
coarser on day 3 on a bean like the harar than I do on 4 or later.
I go by smell, btw. With roasted beans that have anything sorta wild and 
funky going on, I know that a little coarser grind works better in the 
KMB early on. I am not talking a big difference in grind--I'm still 
grinding finer than I would for my pour over.
Vicki
Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
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6) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
Thanks, Vicki.
I guess the reason I haven't tried that is because I already grind for 
KMB at 40% of scale coarser than for Aeropress.
For those who are familiar with the Capresso Infinity grinder, I grind 
for Aeropress at the centre of "Fine"; for KMB at the coarse end of 
"Medium".
Can't hurt to try even coarser, though.
Dave S.
Vicki Smith wrote:
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7) From: Vicki Smith
Hummm. I have a solis maestro classic, and normally I grind for the KMB 
four clicks to the "fine" side of the espresso mark. I go 2 clicks 
coarser when I think it needs it.
vicki
Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
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8) From: Greg C. Rose
I would have to agree about the harar.  After any fresh brewed harar, I
have a habitat of looking at the cup in astonishment, and say "that's good
coffee"...
I am bias towards harar myself, and I have said the phrase "best coffee of
my life" before too.  The first time I said the phrase was my first time
trying harar.
Greg
Enjoying sumatra today

9) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
Hummm indeed! Finer than the expresso mark!
Now, is that mark where you actually do grind to make espresso?
I'm not sure what that will tell me, since I don't make espresso, but if 
that mark can actually be used for calibration, then you and I are 
having very different experiences with our different grinders and our KMB.
Dave S.
Vicki Smith wrote:
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10) From: Vicki Smith
I doubt you can really compare machines, but mine has 20 gradations , 
with the symbol for espresso between 9-10. An argument could be made 
that on its most fine setting, this grinder will not cut it for picky 
espresso machines (or mebbe picky home baristas).
v
Maryann & Dave Schellenberg wrote:
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11) From: Justin Marquez
On 8/20/06, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>
We have spent nearly a month out of this summer season  in La Veta, CO
where I have been assisting in a gas processing plant startup. (Some
things you just have to suffer through as best you can...)
One day I took about a half pound of what I use as "give-away coffee".
 It is a reasonable quality but very inexpensive Guat called "El
Recreo".  Not from SM's, but it can be picked up whenever I am in
Houston and thus I can save the shipping costs. It would probably
score about 83 on Tom's scale, I suspect.  It is about 700% better
homeroasted than anything from the grocery store.  I told all those
grumpy ol' startup guys I had roasted it myself.  Some chuckled.  Some
laughed out loud.  Then they tried it.  I got TWO "Best coffee I ever
tasted!" comments.  One guy has started roasting for himself now.
That homeroasted fresh taste gets 'em nearly every time!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)

12) From: Scott Marquardt
LOL
That's funny because it's so true.
BTW, when I speak of humbling and such, I know of which I speak. Also this
last weekend, I carelessly tapped the hold button on the TC meter (it's the
one Tom sells) while roasting my staple decaf. I happened to do it almost
the same moment I reduced my burner heat around first crack. It kept reading
407 every time I looked at it for about 40 seconds, so I'm like "dang, I'm
stalling the roast" -- and I turned the heat up again. No change, so I turn
it up a bit more. As I'm staring stupidly at "407" still, I hear second
crack start, then roll. I do one of my famous Norwegian forehead slaps and
drop the beans. They actually look lighter than I'd have expected, but to me
one tasted a bit too far into the roast. Even so, when I served folks they
thought it fine. I tasted some today, and it was fine.
We talk about profiles and such, and I've definitely experienced how
important it can be to nail a roast perfectly for a particular origin. But
on the other hand, it's also true that with some beans, anything you do will
leave them tasting great.
Heck, coffee has almost as many contradictions as a woman . . .
;-)
On 8/20/06, Justin Marquez  wrote:
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-- 
Scott

13) From: raymanowen
"coffee has almost as many contradictions as a woman . . .
"
Don't bother- I can't see you! -ro
On 8/20/06, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
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-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the
Wichita WurliTzer

14) From: David B. Westebbe
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

15) From: Scott Marquardt
It's a very small farmer's market, and since only a small proportion of
coffee drinkers grind their own beans, whole bean business hasn't been all
that good. I got into this with no delusions about profit (margins? Ha!), so
I'm still having fun. Mostly I serve Aerobrews (origins of the customer's
choosing), iced or hot. Although people take an interest in the roasting,
the danged roaster is so quiet and unobtrusive -- and Weber-lookin' -- that
few actually notice it unless I mention that "that roast, thar, is fresh
from this mo'nin'!" and point at it.   ;-)
I buy my staple beans for roasting at the market from another vendor, not
SM. However, I brew several origins, roasting two or three days ahead. These
are often SM beans.
I think by samples you mean brewed samples of the whole beans I sell. No, I
haven't done that. Since I sell 12 and 16 oz. cups for consumption, if they
want to sample they can try a cup. If someone did request a sample, I do
have smaller, polystyrene cups I'd use for that. As a rule I'd do a 12 oz.
Aeropressing and split it between them and myself. There's a reason for that
-- I never get to drink coffee! I'm generally busy till 10:00 or so.
Aeropressing adds time to the delivery of the brew to the customer; it's
more labor intensive. It's not onerous labor -- just time consuming. I
haven't had cause to fear a long queue, yet, but there've been some busy
times.
I don't have a mailing list. I won't worry about that this year, I don't
think. I'm not a storefront person, and I doubt I'll do much with this, more
than roast and serve coffee at the market. I intend to be back next year.
Beyond that I can't say. There's no way I can roast during the idle 6 months
of the year. I'll be refering my customers to other regional roasters. Many
of my customers are already well aware of where to get good coffee in the
area.
I have to admit that one of my motives is a genuine interest in helping grow
this market. I think the coffee adds something that could help with that, so
I'm willing to endure a bit of pain -- and lack of profit -- to have some
fun growing this thing. There are intangible rewards that motivate me.
I won't know as worth it until I have the advantage of hindsight.
I sell Aeropresses (a few), and I also have stock of Alfi's new thermos for
cold drinks (a great design, though small volume). I'll likely sell Bodum's
thermal mug for cold drinks next year, as well as the Bodum whirly. That's
three more pieces of hardware than I'd prefer to sell.
My use of the Aeropress in brewing coffee has been entirely stock, though I
generally use hotter water. My interest is in letting people see and
taste exactly what they'd experience if they bought one for themselves. I
could use my latest obsession (polyester) instead of the paper, but that
would risk a bait and switch scenario, IMO.
Among other things, my participation in this market is a way of testing (a)
roasting at a market, and (b) Aerobrewing a cup at a time at a market. IMO,
the latter is only possible if you don't have a huge queue of customers.
Roasting works fine; I'd encourage anyone interested to think carefully --
and have my machinist build a production model of the prototype I'm using.
;-)
BTW, I don't have a sink. With the right technique, the Aeropress may be
cleaned fairly well without help from running water. Keeping the counter
clean is a bit of a pain. I do use some of the brewing water to help with
that when necessary, but things work surprisingly well for cleanliness. The
main pain is when I do something silly with the grinder and some wind
distributes grind all over the counter. That rarely happens, but it's a
major "D'oh! Dang!" moment when it does.
At the end of the season I'll have to put together a synopsis that might
help others think about doing something like this. I'm sure that a viable,
profitable booth at a lively farmer's market would have to operate much
differently than I'm currently operating. Personally, I have no thought
about what's the best way to deliver brew to people; it probably depends on
several things such as whether electricity and running water are available
at a market. My main interest has been in the roasting, and alas, the market
has favored the brew over the beans.
Perhaps my roasts aren't very good!    =8-0
LOL
On 8/22/06, David B. Westebbe  wrote:
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-- 
Scott

16) From: Alison Pfeffer
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I've been quietly enjoying all of your e-mails for a little while  
now, but saw this latest addition that compelled me to jump in.  I  
live in a suburb of Portland and have been roasting for about 6  
months now.  My husband thinks my coffee is so good that he would  
like me to persue doing it on a more serious level.  I am interested  
in trying the local farmer's market but am wondering how much effort  
it is to obtain the needed permits and licenses for food handling.  I  
wondered if any of you had a comment about whether it is worth the  
trouble if you only want to sell a little coffee on the weekend and  
not much more.  I already have a part-time job, but this might to  
something I do just for pure enjoyment.
On Aug 22, 2006, at 6:53 PM, homeroast-request  
wrote:
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I've been quietly enjoying all =
of your e-mails for a little while now, but saw this latest addition =
that compelled me to jump in.  I live in a suburb of Portland and have =
been roasting for about 6 months now.  My husband thinks my coffee is =
so good that he would like me to persue doing it on a more serious =
level.  I am interested in trying the local farmer's market but am =
wondering how much effort it is to obtain the needed permits and =
licenses for food handling.  I wondered if any of you had a comment =
about whether it is worth the trouble if you only want to sell a little =
coffee on the weekend and not much more.  I already have a part-time =
job, but this might to something I do just for pure =
enjoyment.  
On Aug 22, 2006, at 6:53 PM, homeroast-request@=
lists.sweetmarias.com wrote:

Re: +A fine = compliment

= --Apple-Mail-1--248502838--

17) From: Scott Marquardt
No licenses or permits were needed for coffee in our locale. It's a
remarkably unregulated food item.
If I was in this for profit, I'd be despairing just now. I do think profit
is possible -- but I happen to be in a very small market, trying to help it
growm and having fun. If I wanted profit, I'd have signed on for one of the
larger markets in the area. I think you could make some money, but you
probably wouldn't be doing one-up Aeropressings.
The nearest large market is in Oak Park IL, but they wouldn't consider
coffee roasting as a candidate vendor. It's not local produce. Of course,
the logo T-shirts they sell to promote the market aren't local -- they're
made in various Latin countries.   ;-)
Just be wise, and know that weekly preparation, execution and tear-down can
be tiring. And fun.
- Scott
On 8/22/06, Alison Pfeffer  wrote:
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