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Topic: Press Style brewers (5 msgs / 185 lines)
1) From: Mike Denson
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I'm about to buy my first press style brewer.  I've read many reviews,
but wanted your opinions.  
Which is best, the Bodum or the AeroPress.  
Is there really any difference.
Recommendations please.
Thanks
Mike

2) From: Sandy Andina
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Apples and orangutans, IMHO. Seriously, though, it's worth having  
both. Normally, I'd say Aero for single-cups and presspot for pots,  
but I even have single-cup presspots.  The big differences are that  
the Aeropress uses more coffee and paper filters (though some use  
washable polyester and can reuse the paper filters a couple of  
times), has a quick and easy cleanup, completely filters out the  
"fines" and sediment and most of the oils and produces a smoother  
cup. French press uses a bit less coffee, but gives a murkier cup  
with a few more of the bean characteristics, uses no consumables  
other than coffee and water, and is messier to clean than the Aero.  
(You must dump the grounds and rinse a presspot--whereas you just  
eject the puck and filter from an Aero, wipe the rubber piston, and  
you're good to go).
When I want a chewier cup with more oils (and for Latins and  
Centrals, a little more tang and salt), I use a presspot, even for a  
single cup. When I want a smooth cup that I can dilute a little, a  
lot or not at all (quasi-espresso), I use the Aero.  For more than a  
cup, I use the presspot and for four or more cups, electric drip.
On Aug 27, 2006, at 4:14 PM, Mike Denson wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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Apples and orangutans, IMHO. =
Seriously, though, it's worth having both. Normally, I'd say Aero for =
single-cups and presspot for pots, but I even have single-cup =
presspots.  The big differences are that the Aeropress uses more =
coffee and paper filters (though some use washable polyester and can =
reuse the paper filters a couple of times), has a quick and easy =
cleanup, completely filters out the "fines" and sediment and most of the =
oils and produces a smoother cup. French press uses a bit less coffee, =
but gives a murkier cup with a few more of the bean characteristics, =
uses no consumables other than coffee and water, and is messier to clean =
than the Aero. (You must dump the grounds and rinse a presspot--whereas =
you just eject the puck and filter from an Aero, wipe the rubber piston, =
and you're good to go).
When I want a chewier cup = with more oils (and for Latins and Centrals, a little more tang and = salt), I use a presspot, even for a single cup. When I want a smooth cup = that I can dilute a little, a lot or not at all (quasi-espresso), I use = the Aero.  For more than a cup, I use the presspot and for four or = more cups, electric drip. On Aug 27, 2006, at 4:14 PM, Mike = Denson wrote:

I'm about to buy my = first press style brewer.  I've read many reviews, but wanted your = opinions. 

Which is = best, the Bodum or the AeroPress. 

Is there really any difference.

Recommendations please…

Thanks

Mike

= = --Apple-Mail-241-166663711--

3) From: Dennis & Marjorie True
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AEROPRESS!!!!!!!!
Cheap easy and you can control all the variables IMHO....
Dennis
Mike Denson wrote:
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4) From: Eddie Dove
Sandy,
You wrote, "When I want a chewier cup with more oils (and for Latins and
Centrals, a little more tang and salt), I use a presspot, even for a single
cup. When I want a smooth cup that I can dilute a little, a lot or not at
all (quasi-espresso), I use the Aero."
I find this interesting, perhaps leading into another topic.  If you don't
mind, would expound on this?  (e.g. calling out Latins and Centrals for
presspot and why?)
Eddie.
On 8/27/06, Sandy Andina  wrote:
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5) From: Sandy Andina
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Latins and Centrals have a higher degree of acidity, and when brewed  
in a presspot (especially Nicaraguan and Guatemalan) display a  
pleasing hint of saltiness. Those qualities seem to be muted by  
Aeropress brewing, at least to my palate.
On Aug 27, 2006, at 5:39 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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Latins and Centrals have a =
higher degree of acidity, and when brewed in a presspot (especially =
Nicaraguan and Guatemalan) display a pleasing hint of saltiness. Those =
qualities seem to be muted by Aeropress brewing, at least to my =
palate.
On Aug 27, 2006, at 5:39 PM, Eddie Dove =
wrote:
Sandy, You wrote, "When I want a chewier cup with = more oils (and for Latins and Centrals, a little more tang and salt), I = use a presspot, even for a single cup. When I want a smooth cup that I = can dilute a little, a lot or not at all (quasi-espresso), I use the = Aero." I find this interesting, perhaps leading into another = topic.  If you don't mind, would expound on this?  (e.g. calling out = Latins and Centrals for presspot and why?) = Eddie. = --Apple-Mail-242-170304786--


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