HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Folgers article: rant alert (14 msgs / 633 lines)
1) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
I lived downwind from the plant in New Orleans - was right near the 
racetrack where they held jazz fest (I wonder if it survived?) I get 
similar smells here when I drive south: there is still a big roasting 
plant in Hayward, the last big one in the bay area ... I think it is 
Superior? can't recall. Anyway, we have Peets in Emeryville too, and 
each has a distinct roast smell based on degree of roast and the type 
of equipment they use. Folgers/P&G plants definitely have a smell 
that is more industrial/agricultural, probably because of other 
processes they perform there too... not sure really.
The full container sacks are indeed amazing in the same way that 
watching a big container ship pass by you from 100' away is amazing. 
scale, I guess. i was pondering recently how there should be a 
different name for what we buy and what we do with it, and how we 
treat it and what THEY buy and do. It just doesn't make sense that 
both are called "coffee". But the coffee trade is a study in 
contrasts, which brings us back to the Folgers thing. If they can 
make whatever it is they do SEEM like something else, like something 
somebody who grew it, roasted it and enjoyed it actually cared about, 
then they can make some money they aren't really entitled to ... in 
other words, they didn't substantially DO anything different to earn 
a better price for the product. BUT (and I would like to believe this 
could happen) if they actually went from buying really mediocre 
brazil arabica or whatever arabica is cheapest at the time, and 
actually stepped up to HB and HG grade Centrals for this project, 
they would be helping the coffee market in general, and providing a 
better baseline price that could firm up the price paid to really 
good SHB/SHG farmers. Remember, a lot of the coffee crises is due to 
the European changeover from good HB/HG centrals to steamed viet 
robusta and lower grown arabicas. Anyway, if they REALLY did what 
their press release says (buy green coffee inbetween the quality of 
starbux and lowest grown arabicas, etc) then it WOULD be a good 
thing. Will they; probably not ... it would cut into profits, and 
(cynically) they probably believe that their "stressed housewife" of 
their adds would not recognize the difference. See, "Gourmet" is 
something you print on a label to make something seem fancy, no 
longer describing the person who actually cares enough to learn and 
taste and enjoy the differences in ingredients.
OK< I am getting bitter again, but on the flip side, it lends itself 
to another perspective; home roasters, for the problems we face with 
our machines, the learning curve, the understated complexity of the 
process, all the choices in coffee we face, etc ... we definitely 
EARN our enjoyment of coffee. That seems to be truly "Gourmet", 
before folks like P&G took over that word for their own purposes.
OK, rant concluding ... now. Must go cup coffee.
Tom
<Snip>
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

2) From: Leo Zick
excellent point.
while i admit to enjoying a cup of dunkin donuts coffee at work, or  
diner coffee for breakfast out of the house, the at home 'experience'  
is completely different. its more than just having a drink..
Quoting Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee :
<Snip>

3) From: Sandy Andina
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Both the plant and the racetrack survived. Jazzfest was held there  
last spring right on schedule. However, due to molds and other lung  
irritants in the air many artists--especially Aaron Neville--declined  
to appear. My allergist advised against my visiting there until  
further notice because I too am asthmatic.  If the NOLA plant is  
being used to produce these coffees for Folgers, I'd be leery of  
consuming them even if I were not a coffee geek.
On Aug 30, 2006, at 11:55 AM, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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Both the plant and the racetrack =
survived. Jazzfest was held there last spring right on schedule. =
However, due to molds and other lung irritants in the air many =
artists--especially Aaron Neville--declined to appear. My allergist =
advised against my visiting there until further notice because I too am =
asthmatic.  If the NOLA plant is being used to produce these coffees =
for Folgers, I'd be leery of consuming them even if I were not a coffee =
geek.
On Aug 30, 2006, at 11:55 AM, Tom & Maria - Sweet =
Maria's Coffee wrote:

I lived downwind from the = plant in New Orleans - was right near the racetrack where they held jazz = fest (I wonder if it survived?) 

= = --Apple-Mail-291-416394699--

4) From: Sandy Andina
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When I was a kid in Brooklyn, we used to be able to smell the beans  
roasting at night at the Savarin plant as we drove along the BQE.   
IMHO, the aroma was one of the things that hooked me on good coffee.   
(Savarin was a tad more expensive than most of the other brands).   
When the Silvercup bakery was producing bread at the same time, I  
would get severe breakfast cravings.
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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When I was a kid in Brooklyn, we =
used to be able to smell the beans roasting at night at the Savarin =
plant as we drove along the BQE.  IMHO, the aroma was one of the =
things that hooked me on good coffee.  (Savarin was a tad more =
expensive than most of the other brands).  When the Silvercup bakery =
was producing bread at the same time, I would get severe breakfast =
cravings.
 
=
--Apple-Mail-292-416570788--

5) From: Les
Tom said, "I guess. i was pondering recently how there should be a
<Snip>
Tom,
I don't drink coffee.  I drink homeroast.  I don't call it coffee.
When people ask if I would like a cup of coffee, I politely say, "No
thank you, I don't drink coffee."  When they looked confused and
comment on roasting my own, I tell them I drink homeroast, it is a
different beverage, and offer them some.  By the way I enjoyed a very
fine TV brewed, roasted full city, Kenya AA Auction Lot 434
-Kithungururu this morning.  What an awesome cup of homeroast.  I just
loved all the floral notes and that nothing really blasted the palate
like some of the Kenyans.
Les
On 8/30/06, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
 wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Leo Zick
ummm, so, do you watch TV, or watch LCD?
do you listen to the radio, or the frequency modulation?
i think coffee is coffee, granted, with degrees of quality, but its  
still coffee.
you can homeroast anything really, right?  for instance, a pile of  
crap. it would be homeroasted, but youd really just be drinking crap. :)
Quoting Les :
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7) From: Tom Ulmer
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Sorry to hear about your and Aaron Neville's breathing maladies. I didn't
realize there were many artists who declined to appear as I was mostly
interested in those that did. in impressive array of talent indeed. Who
knows? Maybe the plant in New Orleans was built on the southern end of the
Love Canal?  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Sandy Andina
Sent: Wednesday, August 30, 2006 3:06 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Folgers article: rant alert
Both the plant and the racetrack survived. Jazzfest was held there last
spring right on schedule. However, due to molds and other lung irritants in
the air many artists--especially Aaron Neville--declined to appear. My
allergist advised against my visiting there until further notice because I
too am asthmatic. If the NOLA plant is being used to produce these coffees
for Folgers, I'd be leery of consuming them even if I were not a coffee
geek.
On Aug 30, 2006, at 11:55 AM, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee wrote:
I lived downwind from the plant in New Orleans - was right near the
racetrack where they held jazz fest (I wonder if it survived?) 
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com

8) From: Sandy Andina
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It breaks my heart. I adore New Orleans (have written three songs  
about it, two of which I've recorded) and have been to Jazzfest 6  
times. My husband's a cardiologist, and the American College of  
Cardiology is meeting there in spring 2007--but barring a miracle, it  =
won't be safe yet for me to go.
On Aug 30, 2006, at 3:07 PM, Tom Ulmer wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-296-420631804
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It breaks my heart. I adore New =
Orleans (have written three songs about it, two of which I've recorded) =
and have been to Jazzfest 6 times. My husband's a cardiologist, and the =
American College of Cardiology is meeting there in spring 2007--but =
barring a miracle, it won't be safe yet for me to go.
On =
Aug 30, 2006, at 3:07 PM, Tom Ulmer wrote:

Sorry to hear about = your and Aaron Neville’s breathing maladies. I didn’t realize there = were many artists who declined to appear as I was mostly interested in = those that did… in impressive array of talent indeed. Who knows? Maybe = the plant in New Orleans was built on the southern end of the Love ?

 

homeroast-admin [mailto:homeroast-adm= in] On Behalf Of Sandy Andina
Sent: Wednesday, August 30, 2006 3:06 PM
homeroast= s.com
Re: +Folgers = article: rant alert

 

Both the plant and the racetrack survived. = Jazzfest was held there last spring right on schedule. However, due to = molds and other lung irritants in the air many artists--especially Aaron = Neville--declined to appear. My allergist advised against my visiting = there until further notice because I too am asthmatic. If the NOLA plant = is being used to produce these coffees for Folgers, I'd be leery of = consuming them even if I were not a coffee geek.On Aug 30, 2006, at 11:55 AM, Tom & Maria - Sweet = Maria's Coffee wrote:


I lived downwind from = the plant in New = Orleans - was right near the racetrack = where they held jazz fest (I wonder if it survived?)

www.sandyandina.com



= = --Apple-Mail-296-420631804--


9) From: Steven Van Dyke
Tom,
There's a local roaster here in KC too - The Roasterie.  If I'm out and want
coffee I can get by with a cup of theirs from any shop that does good
business.  They don't roast quite as nice a selection of greens (partly
because they need so much more volume) and they roast some of them a bit
dark, but any local shop with their coffee that does decent business will
have coffee that *isn't* stale.
On the occasions I've been near them when they roast you can tell the
difference.  Also they air roast rather than the more common high speed
drums.
Enjoy!
Steve :->

10) From: Vicki Smith
Taking this thread to a new low...
When I lived in St. Louis, I was about two blocks away from a very good 
local roaster. And while I was not surprised that I could smell the 
roasting when I passed by, I was somewhat surprise when suddenly I was 
smelling roasting coffee as I woke up every morning, even when my 
windows were closed in the winter.
It was a lovely way to wake up, even if it was somewhat mysterious.
Imagine my surprise when after several years of this I found that I was 
not smelling coffee at all. It was actually a symptom of a 
neurological/seizure disorder, the more usual manifestation of which is 
smelling something akin to dog poop.
Lucky me.
Vicki
Steven Van Dyke wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Steven Van Dyke
Vicki,
Hmmm.... if you had been driving by a Folgers plant you would have had the
normal manifestation as well.
Hope everything turned out ok for you!
Enjoy!
Steve :->

12) From: Aaron
It's either folgers or maxwell house, I think it's the latter that is 
out here in jacksonville, and if you pass by when the wind is right. wow 
the whole place smells like burnt crap.  Now some places like bakeries, 
or grain places (make cereals etc) the smell is not bad when you pass 
them, some even mouth watering, but the coffee ugh, it's terrible.
so it is said that they are going to do a 'step up' on their quality of 
coffee and pick something between starbucks and the normal disgusta they 
roast. and call it their gourmet... umm. that's not much of a step.  Id 
think starbucks doesn't exactly go for the best beans either, .. or 
they'd not have to burn the living hell out of them to hide the flavors 
of them.
I bet I can safely say that, even the batches we manage to ruin, 
probably taste better than S, F or MH on their best day.
aaron

13) From: Derek Bradford
On 9/1/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
They don't go for the best beans, that's quite true.  But I did read
once (maybe from Tom?) that the Starbucks cuppers were really pretty
decent guys who tried their best, but were limited by corporate
constraints.
As for the roasting thing, don't they roast so darkly primarily to
maintain a consistent flavour?  True they're hiding things by roasting
so dark, but by eclipsing origin flavour with roast flavour, they can
maintain a consistent taste from batch to batch and year to year.
<Snip>
I absolutely agree.
--Derek
-- 
The Uglyroast 3! Coffee Roaster.  ...Now 85% less ugly!http://uglyroast.atspace.com

14) From: John Blumel
On Aug 30, 2006, at 12:55 pm, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee wrote:
<Snip>
Actually, since you lived there, the racetrack burned down, was  
rebuilt, and got flooded, but they did have JazzFest there this past  
spring. I believe some of Angelo's friends were there. But, that was  
one of the interesting things about living in New Orleans when I was  
there: running across the smell of roasting coffee in sometimes  
unexpected places, not just near the big plants, but in the middle of  
neighborhoods. I wonder how many of the small and medium roasters are  
back in business now. Well, it's a long way from Mulberry St., from  
where I'm writing this message.
John Blumel


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