HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Afternoon madness (9 msgs / 314 lines)
1) From: Dan Kellgren
I thought I'd share some coffee "overstock" with my co-workers here this
afternoon.
See - my mother-in-law buys me several pounds of StarBurns for every
holiday, even though I tell her that I don't like it and I don't drink it.
So before work this morning, I ground up some of these fine charred beans
and brought them in.  I just brewed up a nice big dirty pot of it (dirty
because the drip maker here needs SERIOUS cleansing if you know what I mean)
for all to (enjoy).
Curious as to why I once thought this was "good stuff", I took a cup.  The
aroma was fair, but the definitive taste of charred wood overpowered my
mouth.  Then I swallow it and was no-so-pleasantly greeted with a rough
burning sensation down my throat.  Further analysis of this is not needed.
Man is this stuff bad.  And I don't mean that just to slam a mass coffee.
It's just bad.
Can't wait to get home and cleanse my pallet with my newly roasted 1/4 lb.
batch of Ethiopia Sidamo, perfectly roasted in my ST for 7 1/2 mins at
350-400 degrees.  FP brewed of course.
Dan K

2) From: Diablo
Had some Sidamo this morning that I cut with about 20% dark roasted manhelling.
 Rich Blueberry savoryness going on.  I over roasted the Sidamo just a hair and
it lost a touch of the blueberry:(  So I am doing just a bit or experiementing
with this batch.  Cheers Dan
LR
--- Dan Kellgren  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Dan Kellgren
I haven't had any blueberry yet in my Sidamo.  I get plenty in the Harrar
and in my Rwanda Fair Trade though.
On 9/7/06, Diablo  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I have about 5 pounds of charbucks beans I am bringing them on Cruise
with me so that the masses will be happy and not clamor over my fresh
roast. 
LOL I used to think that charbucks was good coffee too!
 
Dennis
 
AKA
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
 
CS-5 DSPO
CS Dept CC
CS Dept TRANO
Duty Sec 1 CS E6 S/L
CS Dept Mentorship Coordinator
 
"Life Liberty and the pursuit of all who threaten it..."
 
I thought I'd share some coffee "overstock" with my co-workers here this
afternoon.
 
See - my mother-in-law buys me several pounds of StarBurns for every
holiday, even though I tell her that I don't like it and I don't drink
it.
 
So before work this morning, I ground up some of these fine charred
beans and brought them in.  I just brewed up a nice big dirty pot of it
(dirty because the drip maker here needs SERIOUS cleansing if you know
what I mean) for all to (enjoy).  
 
Curious as to why I once thought this was "good stuff", I took a cup.
The aroma was fair, but the definitive taste of charred wood overpowered
my mouth.  Then I swallow it and was no-so-pleasantly greeted with a
rough burning sensation down my throat.  Further analysis of this is not
needed. 
 
Man is this stuff bad.  And I don't mean that just to slam a mass
coffee.  It's just bad.
 
Can't wait to get home and cleanse my pallet with my newly roasted 1/4
lb. batch of Ethiopia Sidamo, perfectly roasted in my ST for 7 1/2 mins
at 350-400 degrees.  FP brewed of course.
 
Dan K

5) From: George Birchard
Dan Kellgren wrote:
<Snip>
*$ coffee is designed to be consumed with large quantities of milk or 
cream. [However, fixed that way it makes my stomach go strombolian.] *$ 
tastes burned without the milk that binds the burned compounds. It's not 
made to be consumed black. Why people pay so much for a cup of that 
stuff is something I cannot comprehend.

6) From: Brett Mason
I have been surprised at some *$ where I have purchased their "Lightnote
Blends" and found a more normal roast...
Brett
On 9/7/06, George Birchard  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Brett

7) From: Justin Marquez
On 9/7/06, George Birchard  wrote:
<Snip>
We had a cup of Costa Rican brewed coffee at a *$'s in Cleburne, TX
back in early May. It was decidely bitter, even with cream and sugar
added.  I could not drink the whole cup.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)

8) From: Sandy Andina
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On Sep 7, 2006, at 7:46 PM, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
The Lightnote isn't bad--IF, and that's a big IF, it's fresh and  
brewed normal strength. You'd never know it, though, if you drank it  
brewed at a *$ store:  it'd be brewed way too strong, in order to  
give customers a consistent "*$ flavor profile," which is to say  
strong and dark. Because it is roasted lighter (more like a FC-FC+  
than the usual dark Vienna) than their typical offerings, it must be  
brewed stronger in order to give the customers what the company  
believes they have come to expect.
People who have come to specialty coffee through *$, or Peet's think  
that quality whole bean coffee must be roasted to within an inch of  
its life in order to be any good.  They will, if given a choice of  
roasts at other establishments (such as Krispy Kreme or Caribou), opt  
for the darkest or "boldest" roast to convey their sophistication.    
This is so even in my own family.  My husband came home gushing over  
the specialty coffees in his hospital's cafeteria, and informed me  
that his favorite coffee is "Sumatra," because it is so good at the  
cafeteria.  So I bought a fiver of SM's Aged Sumatra and roasted it  
in consecutive batches  to FC+-Vienna. Then, when it was gone, I  
substituted Uganda Bugisu and Rwanda Gatare, also darkishly roasted,  
and he didn't notice the difference. Finally, I roasted some Sumatra  
Organic Gayo Mt. to City+, and he remarked it was delicious, but why  
did I suddenly switch from Sumatra? He was floored when I showed him  
the bag. He has come to accept whatever I roast these days, as long  
as it's mine.  I visited the hospital cafeteria, and sure enough,  
their "Sumatra" is indeed the dark roast offering.
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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On Sep 7, 2006, at =
7:46 PM, Brett Mason wrote:
I have = been surprised at some *$ where I have purchased their "Lightnote = Blends" and found a more normal roast.
The Lightnote isn't bad--IF, and = that's a big IF, it's fresh and brewed normal strength. You'd never know = it, though, if you drank it brewed at a *$ store:  it'd be brewed way = too strong, in order to give customers a consistent "*$ flavor profile," = which is to say strong and dark. Because it is roasted lighter (more = like a FC-FC+ than the usual dark Vienna) than their typical offerings, = it must be brewed stronger in order to give the customers what the = company believes they have come to expect. 
People who have come to = specialty coffee through *$, or Peet's think that quality whole bean = coffee must be roasted to within an inch of its life in order to be any = good.  They will, if given a choice of roasts at other establishments = (such as Krispy Kreme or Caribou), opt for the darkest or "boldest" = roast to convey their sophistication.   This is so even in my own = family.  My husband came home gushing over the specialty coffees in = his hospital's cafeteria, and informed me that his favorite coffee is = "Sumatra," because it is so good at the cafeteria.  So I bought a = fiver of SM's Aged Sumatra and roasted it in consecutive batches  to = FC+-Vienna. Then, when it was gone, I substituted Uganda Bugisu and = Rwanda Gatare, also darkishly roasted, and he didn't notice the = difference. Finally, I roasted some Sumatra Organic Gayo Mt. to City+, = and he remarked it was delicious, but why did I suddenly switch from = Sumatra? He was floored when I showed him the bag. He has come to accept = whatever I roast these days, as long as it's mine.  I visited the = hospital cafeteria, and sure enough, their "Sumatra" is indeed the dark = roast offering.  = --Apple-Mail-62--1017658219--

9) From: Scott Miller
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I have tasted *$ 3 times in the last month. That's probably a record for 
me since it's a brand I really don't like at all; won't go in to much 
detail on the "why" other than to say it was not my decision to drink 
the stuff on two of the times I had it.
I had a cup, in store a month ago, of the Yukon Blend: the person 
serving it said it was a bolder blend. It wasn't very good. I don't have 
any descriptive cupping terms to offer that have not already been used 
to define the stuff. I received a needed dose of caffeine that could 
have easily been achieved with a NoDoz tablet... I probably would have 
experienced less bitterness... even if I had chewed the NoDoz.
Two weeks ago, I bought a bag of the House Blend beans... $7.46 + tax 
@WalMart. Tthe bag has the descriptive terms "Medium" and "Latin 
America" on it. A friend wanted to see & taste the difference between 
what I roast and the Mermaid stuff. I did side by side vacpots 
simultaneously so the bloom and aromas were easy for my friend to 
observe. In addition to those easy to spot characteristics, my friend 
blindly picked my Brazil/Panama/Colombia blend as "soooo gooood!" The *$ 
received a "bitter face" expression. She didn't have to say a thing; 
it's always obvious by facial expression when a person experiences a 
bitter flavor.
This morning I was helping my mother move some furniture and do some 
errands; she wanted a latte and pulled into a shopping center where I 
went into a hardware store while she got coffee. I asked her what coffee 
she got me and she couldn't even remember the name of blend as she 
quipped "like you even care." It wasn't as bitter as the Yukon Blend or 
as flat as the House Blend, but there was nothing positive to say about 
this cup either... other than it didn't suck as bad as the previous 
examples. My mom's latte was a passable drink. I've had worse at 
independent shops recently.
Recently Ken Davids reviewed the Sulawesi Black Apron Mermaid coffee. 
His comment was:
"Who should drink it: Another decent but essentially listless and flat 
coffee from Starbucks, which over the past couple of years seems to have 
finally succumbed to the dangers of hugeness. In a case like this one I 
am not clear whether the coffee started out without character and 
energy, was held in the warehouse too long before roasting, was roasted 
badly, or whether it simply sat in the packaging so long after roasting 
and it went flat without going outright stale."
That pretty well sums up my experience with their beans: I can't always 
identify where along the way things were botched other than the obviious 
fact that the beans they select have their quality compromised by $$ 
considerations and the need to purchase massive quantities that further 
limits quality options, but it sure doesn't take great skill or 
experience to figure out it's a different breed from what we roast and 
brew ourselves.
cheers,
ScoTTT
Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest