HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Cardamon (8 msgs / 262 lines)
1) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Cardamon is an unbeleivable spice. Before I got into home roasting, I used
to grind up a pod or two with my coffee beans, and mix it in the french
press. Talk about orange accent in coffee! It brews up an unbeleivable and
spicy cup! I haven't yet used cardamon with home-roasted coffee, because I'm
scared I'll mask the delicate flavors I worked so hard to bring out and
appreciate. Well see. Maybe I'll take an appropriate coffee to vienna, and
mix some with chicory, and some with cardamon. BTW, I know there was a
recent post about holiday blends. Nothing tastes more holidayish than coffee
ground/brewed with cardamon. When I was in cooking school I learned to use
ground cardamon, cinnamon, and lemon extract when baking apple pies... Best
apple pie you'll ever have. I guarantee it! Also good on blueberries. I also
beleive it is an ingredient used in the making of the German holiday treat,
Stollen. I used to always mix it into my brioche doughs when making cinnamon
or almond (frangipan) bunns too. To be traditional you could make cardamon
coffee in an Ibrik or moka pot, add some sugar, and sip up. I don't think it
really matters which type of cardamon you use (green or white pods)- each
tastes wonderful. I've used both. Anyway, it's a great spice... check it
out.

2) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-85--758670620
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I brew shots for company sometimes as "Espresso Allegro" (invented by  
the U. Dist. cafe of the same name where I first drank them in  
1977).  Loosely crush a cardamom pod with your fingers and place the  
seeds in the bottom of a preheated espresso cup. Add 1 t. of honey.   
Pull the shot, stir (don't destroy the crema) and serve.
On Sep 10, 2006, at 3:01 PM, Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-85--758670620
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
I brew shots for company =
sometimes as "Espresso Allegro" (invented by the U. Dist. cafe of the =
same name where I first drank them in 1977).  Loosely crush a cardamom =
pod with your fingers and place the seeds in the bottom of a preheated =
espresso cup. Add 1 t. of honey.  Pull the shot, stir (don't destroy =
the crema) and serve.
On Sep 10, 2006, at 3:01 PM, Jeremy =
DeFranco wrote:
Cardamon is an unbeleivable spice. Before I got into home = roasting, I used to grind up a pod or two with my coffee beans, and mix = it in the french press. Talk about orange accent in coffee! It brews up = an unbeleivable and spicy cup! I haven't yet used cardamon with = home-roasted coffee, because I'm scared I'll mask the delicate flavors I = worked so hard to bring out and appreciate. Well see. Maybe I'll take an = appropriate coffee to vienna, and mix some with chicory, and some with = cardamon. BTW, I know there was a recent post about holiday blends. = Nothing tastes more holidayish than coffee ground/brewed with cardamon. = When I was in cooking school I learned to use ground cardamon, cinnamon, = and lemon extract when baking apple pies... Best apple pie you'll ever = have. I guarantee it! Also good on blueberries. I also beleive it is an = ingredient used in the making of the German holiday treat, Stollen. I = used to always mix it into my brioche doughs when making cinnamon or = almond (frangipan) bunns too. To be traditional you could make cardamon = coffee in an Ibrik or moka pot, add some sugar, and sip up. I don't = think it really matters which type of cardamon you use (green or white = pods)- each tastes wonderful. I've used both. Anyway, it's a great = spice... check it out. = --Apple-Mail-85--758670620--

3) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
hmmm, honey in place of sugar in an espresso..
now this sounds interesting!  
From: Sandy Andina [mailto:sandraandina] 
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2006 9:13 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Re: Cardamon
I brew shots for company sometimes as "Espresso Allegro" (invented by the U.
Dist. cafe of the same name where I first drank them in 1977). Loosely crush
a cardamom pod with your fingers and place the seeds in the bottom of a
preheated espresso cup. Add 1 t. of honey. Pull the shot, stir (don't
destroy the crema) and serve.
On Sep 10, 2006, at 3:01 PM, Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
Cardamon is an unbeleivable spice. Before I got into home roasting, I used
to grind up a pod or two with my coffee beans, and mix it in the french
press. Talk about orange accent in coffee! It brews up an unbeleivable and
spicy cup! I haven't yet used cardamon with home-roasted coffee, because I'm
scared I'll mask the delicate flavors I worked so hard to bring out and
appreciate. Well see. Maybe I'll take an appropriate coffee to vienna, and
mix some with chicory, and some with cardamon. BTW, I know there was a
recent post about holiday blends. Nothing tastes more holidayish than coffee
ground/brewed with cardamon. When I was in cooking school I learned to use
ground cardamon, cinnamon, and lemon extract when baking apple pies... Best
apple pie you'll ever have. I guarantee it! Also good on blueberries. I also
beleive it is an ingredient used in the making of the German holiday treat,
Stollen. I used to always mix it into my brioche doughs when making cinnamon
or almond (frangipan) bunns too. To be traditional you could make cardamon
coffee in an Ibrik or moka pot, add some sugar, and sip up. I don't think it
really matters which type of cardamon you use (green or white pods)- each
tastes wonderful. I've used both. Anyway, it's a great spice... check it
out. 
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com

4) From: Michael Wascher
A Greek friend used honey in his coffee. We have a selection of honeys that
Jean uses in tea & I use most often on Eierpfankuchen (literally
egg-pan-cake -- a German pancake often made with fresh fruit then served
with honey & cinnamon).
Mixing & match the flavors of honey with the coffee would be another level
of flavor blending. The common clover honey is light with mild flavor. We
have a very small jar of  Macadamia honey that is thick & dark, almost
tarry, with a strong bitter flavor. Tupelo is my favorite, heavy bodied with
fruity flavor.
What I don't have is coffee blossom honey. A quick google shows a couple of
sources of coffee-blossom honey originating from Java/Bali. The description
is:
*Coffee Blossom Honey*: Much like the heady floral perfume of coffee
blossoms themselves, this honey is fragrant with the aroma and flavor of
citrus zest and star fruit.
--MikeW
On 9/10/06, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter
and those who matter don't mind.
  - Dr. Seuss

5) From: Leo Zick
thanks for the info, ill at least try with 'regular' honey for now.
got a recipe for pancakes?  :)
Quoting Michael Wascher :
<Snip>
t
<Snip>
th
<Snip>
f
<Snip>
n
<Snip>
of
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
I'm
<Snip>
d
<Snip>
fee
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
st
<Snip>
lso
<Snip>
t,
<Snip>
mon
<Snip>
n
<Snip>
 it
<Snip>

6) From: Justin Marquez
On 9/11/06, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>
Yes I do.
Mix dry...
   Measure out 1 cup plain flour, then sift it if you feel compelled to do that.
   3 teaspoons sugar
   1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
   1/4 teaspoon salt
Mix wet...
   1 beaten egg (or 1/4 cup egg-beaters)
   1/8 cup veg. oil
    1 cup buttermilk
Add to the dry mix and mix very well. (Most recipes tell you to mix
and leave lumps in the mix.  I don't like that. I mix it completely
smooth and add the plain milk to get the light, thin pancackes that I
like.)
Then add...
    regular milk to make a fairly thin consistency usually less than a cup
I like my pancakes light and thin, so the final mix looks thinner than
you'd expect.  Experiment with the addition of the plain milk until
you find the blend that makes a pancake consistency that you like.
This makes about 12 pancakes, about 3 " in diameter.  If you make them
much larger, they will be hard to turn because they are so light. I
make 'em 3 at a time in a 12" skillet.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)

7) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
<Snip>
You are absolutely correct in mixing to smoothness. I believe that it is
difficult to overmix a batter. Pancakes need the gluten structure to hold
the gases and form the light and airy cakes. The gluten is developed by
mixing and resting to allow hydration. I always add olive oil to the batter
at the last moment before cooking. I do not use milk, plain water works
better for me. If the batter is too thin, you will see large bubbles form
during the initial cooking stage. All that gas in the bubbles is lost to the
cake, making it denser and tougher than it should be. The same occurs in
muffin batter, if you see tunnels in the finished muffin, the batter is too
thin.
Do not forget to add herbs and spices, fruit and/or fruit purees, and grains
like corn, oats, and buckwheat (ground to meal or flour) to the basic mix.
--

8) From: Justin Marquez
On 9/12/06, Ken Mary  wrote:
<Snip>
I have also used water as the second liquid addition.  Water is very
effective at thinning the batter mix. If we have buttermilk in the
fridge, I'll always use up to a cup of it as the first liquid because
I like the flavor it adds.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (Snyder, TX)


HomeRoast Digest