HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Staying power of frozen beans, and more (classic italian) (4 msgs / 160 lines)
1) From: Leo Zick
Just opened a lb of SM roasted classic italian beans.  I ordered them in
July, they were roasted by SM on july 10, and went right into my freezer on
7/12.  so, 2 months later, and testing a few other blends in between, I just
went back to them.  WOW.
First off, freezing the beans seemed to make no difference at all.  That's
impressive!  I will note that the bag was completely free of air when it
went into the freezer. I guess between sealing it and its outgassing, the
one way valve did its trick. Im sure that made a big difference.
The shot is still lingering in my mouth.  Man that is one amazingly creamy
coffee. I pulled a 1oz double ristretto, at around 200F. (give or take, it
was warm not hot. Lol)
It poured perfectly, held sugar for about 8 seconds (7-10 is ideal in my
book), and coated my mouth with caramelly happiness :D
If there were a hint more floral notes, this would be my (now) ideal
espresso.  I say now b/c that always changes. But man this is good. From
what I remember of the moka kadir, it had that floral character, but cant be
sure. Good thing I just ordered some greens!
Im curious, im guessing it's a trade secret, but would anyone know the blend
for classic italian?  Id like to play around with the mix and see if I can
get it a bit sweeter, maybe remove just a bit of the initial bite you get.
Im guessing maybe lower the robusta content, just slightly?

2) From: Wesley Simon
My understanding of freezing the beans is that it is a good practice.  One
issue is that if you pull a bag out, set it on the counter for a little bit,
and then return it to the freezer, moisture can be absorbed, condensation
forms on the beans and you end up with wet beans when you pull them back
out.  Another issue is that frozen beans grind differently than room
temperature beans.  Apparently there is some breaking rather than grinding
going on.
It would seem that the moral of the story is to take frozen beans out and
let them thaw to room temperature before grinding and then not freeze them
again.
Wes
On 9/11/06, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
i didnt grind them frozen, they were defrosted for about 5 hours before i
used them last night. my shot this morning, after sitting in their drawer
for the evening, had the same tasty results. :)  
From: Wesley Simon [mailto:gm.wesley] 
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 10:11 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Staying power of frozen beans, and more (classic italian)
My understanding of freezing the beans is that it is a good practice.  One
issue is that if you pull a bag out, set it on the counter for a little bit,
and then return it to the freezer, moisture can be absorbed, condensation
forms on the beans and you end up with wet beans when you pull them back
out.  Another issue is that frozen beans grind differently than room
temperature beans.  Apparently there is some breaking rather than grinding
going on.  
It would seem that the moral of the story is to take frozen beans out and
let them thaw to room temperature before grinding and then not freeze them
again.
Wes
On 9/11/06, Leo Zick  wrote: 
Just opened a lb of SM roasted classic italian beans.  I ordered them in
July, they were roasted by SM on july 10, and went right into my freezer on
7/12.  so, 2 months later, and testing a few other blends in between, I just
went back to them.  WOW.
First off, freezing the beans seemed to make no difference at all.  That's
impressive!  I will note that the bag was completely free of air when it
went into the freezer. I guess between sealing it and its outgassing, the 
one way valve did its trick. Im sure that made a big difference.
The shot is still lingering in my mouth.  Man that is one amazingly creamy
coffee. I pulled a 1oz double ristretto, at around 200F. (give or take, it 
was warm not hot. Lol)
It poured perfectly, held sugar for about 8 seconds (7-10 is ideal in my
book), and coated my mouth with caramelly happiness :D
If there were a hint more floral notes, this would be my (now) ideal 
espresso.  I say now b/c that always changes. But man this is good. From
what I remember of the moka kadir, it had that floral character, but cant be
sure. Good thing I just ordered some greens!
Im curious, im guessing it's a trade secret, but would anyone know the blend
for classic italian?  Id like to play around with the mix and see if I can
get it a bit sweeter, maybe remove just a bit of the initial bite you get.
Im guessing maybe lower the robusta content, just slightly?

4) From: miKe mcKoffee
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Wesley Simon
	Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 7:11 AM
<Snip>
	My understanding of freezing the beans is that it is a good
practice.  One issue is that if you pull a bag out, set it on the counter
for a little bit, and then return it to the freezer, moisture can be
absorbed, condensation forms on the beans and you end up with wet beans when
you pull them back out.  Another issue is that frozen beans grind
differently than room temperature beans.  Apparently there is some breaking
rather than grinding going on.  
	
	It would seem that the moral of the story is to take frozen beans
out and let them thaw to room temperature before grinding and then not
freeze them again.
	
	Wes
<Snip>
Yes, let the frozen beans come up to room temp before grinding. However
measuring out for the grind and immediately returning to freezer never been
a problem when re-vac'ing the mason jar before returning to the freezer:-)
Beans not out of freezer long enough to thaw AND any moisture condensation
that does happen is vac'd out.
While not my normal roasted coffee storage I do use it for when returning
from travel and/or if happen to get over-stocked with roasted. Far better to
vac & freeze da beans at 5 to 10 days rest than have them sit at room
temperature over 2 weeks. Preferably if anticipating not using within 10
days vac'ing day 4 or 5 rest.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.


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