HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Swill > RE: HX temp inconsistency> RE: thermofilters WAS:+ExpobarBrewtus and La Spaziale S1 (3 msgs / 68 lines)
1) From: miKe mcKoffee
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Les
	Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2006 11:38 AM
<Snip>
  You can have the best equipment in the world and still make swill.
I can take you to a coffee shop here in Roseburg that has good beans, Mazzer
Grinders, and a nice LaMarzzoco espresso machine.  They make consistent sink
shots all day long.  Some of the worst swill I have ever tasted.  They don't
know their machines!   So the secret to great espresso is to know your
machine. 
	 
<Snip>
Sometimes it seems almost criminal what gets passed off as espresso. I
suspect their barista techniques are "somewhat lacking" too:-) And as you
say, part of said technique knowing ones equipment of course!
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

2) From: Barry Luterman
This thread goes towards upgrade fever. When you think of it "The Fever" 
serves a purpose. Starting roasting with a popper, heat gun or Wok teaches 
us how to control roasts recognize cracks etc. Then moving up to a more 
automated roaster only enhances our skills. Starting with an automated 
machine teaches us little and we are locked into the manufacturers pre sets 
of the ideal coffee. This phenomenon is especially true of Espresso 
machines. If you master Silvia. You can upgrade to almost any machine with 
success.
I remember my first clinical job. My chief would never let me use the 
expensive impression material. He would always use the expensive stuff and 
never have to do a remake.I was constantly making remakes. I thought it was 
because of the cheap materials he was forcing me to use. Eventually, as I 
had fewer and fewer remakes he told me I could use the expensive material. 
Sure enough I seldom had a remake. Guess the lesson is a good one. Learn 
your craft first. Then upgrade.

3) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 9/14/06, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>
I like that analogy, Barry.
Brian


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