HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Venezuela (3 msgs / 77 lines)
1) From: David Schooley
A friend has agreed to bring me some greens from Venezuela when she
goes home over Christmas. The beans will be from the area surrounding
her town, and possibly from her family's farm. Any ideas on what to
expect? From talking to her, it sounds like they are typically taken
to a French roast.
I do not know what part of Venezuela she is from, or the varietal, but
I will find out.

2) From: Stuart Krivis
David Schooley wrote:
<Snip>
All of the coffee I have ever had in Venezuela was roasted very dark. 
They then grind it very fine and make it with an espresso machine, 
although they don't call it espresso. It's usually taken very strong and 
very sweet.
Then there is cafe con leche, which is also an espresso shot, lots of 
sugar, and powdered milk. (Powdered milk is far more popular than fresh 
milk in Venezuela. You can get a wide variety of brands in the stores.)
Finally, they also sometimes drink a less strong mixture called cafe 
guayoyo. (Sort of pronounced wha-yoyo) :-) It's espresso with extra hot 
water added afterwards.
Cafe con leche can be very good, and you can get one almost anywhere you 
go, but I always wind up missing a plain old cup of regular coffee.
I never saw anything but ground coffee in the stores there, and it was 
all in plastic bags that didn't feel vacuum-packed or anything.
Parts of Venezuela are mountainous, but I don't know if they grow coffee 
in those areas or not. (They definitely do grow coffee there though; the 
stuff you get in the stores is all domestic.)
You might ask if she can bring back a bottle of Cacique rum. The Cacique 
Ron Anejo is excellent. I'd rate it as one of the best mass-produced 
rums in the world. (It's much better than Bacardi IMO.) Note that it is 
not a white rum, but I don't like white rum anyway. :-)
Oh, Venezuela is also a sugar-producing country, and cane sugar is far 
less expensive than corn syrup (if you can even get corn syrup there). 
So Coca-Cola never changed their recipe there and Venezuelan Coke is 
like US Coke used to be in the good old days.
Some Ron, some Coke, and a little Limon (lime) and you're drinking a 
classic Cuba Libre the way they used to be when Americans could go to 
the clubs in Havana. :-)

3) From: Alchemist John
I have had Venezuelan coffee once and it was mild, soft and 
balanced.  This particular bean had a different flavor that was 
pleasant, but not something I would want to drink everyday.  For lack 
of a better term, it was classic Central American flavor.
At 15:29 9/28/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/


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