HomeRoast Digest


Topic: SCAA Guild requirements > RE: +looking for cupping experience (26 msgs / 895 lines)
1) From: miKe mcKoffee
There does seem to be a disparity between the two SCAA Guild membership
requirements. The Roasters Guild requires being or working for a SCAA Member
Shop plus references from two SCAA Members and an employer reference while
OTH the Barista Guild simply requires coffee preparation being an integral
part of your profession and having a professed desire to excel at your craft
and have a passion for coffee. Regardless the Barista Guild not requiring
SCAA membership for Guild membership a "home" barista would also not qualify
for barista guild membership.
This may seem unfair to home roasters or home baristi but is it? What is a
guild anyway? My understanding since their inception in medieval times they
were associations of merchants or craftman with the sole purpose of
perfecting and perpetuating their trades. Guilds never were for hobbyists
but strictly for those seeking to eek out a living at the craft. So is it
fair? I don't know, it is just the way it always has been.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Scott Marquardt
	Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 7:50 PM
<Snip>
	There's been a lot of whining about the SCAA from others; my gripe
is that SCAA membership is necessary for guild membership. I don't think
it's misleading to call that expensive. It might be misleading if folks with
a lot of money to toss around imagine that I'm being disingenuous, but I
assure you that for me, it's expensive and I'm being sincere. 
	 
	Obviously YMMV.
	 
<Snip>

2) From: Scott Marquardt
The way it always has been? Not really. I don't see the roaster's guild
picking up support for the widows of deceased guild members. I mean, if
we're going to hold ourselves to respecting the traditionally exclusive
character of guilds (which I don't necessarily question per se), it'd be
fair to hold guilds to providing the traditional benefits of guild
membership, to their members.
;-)
It seems to me that a guild is what we make of it, more than what historical
institutions its name reminds us of. And believe me, I have no qualms with
the Roaster's Guild's policy of NOT supporting the widows (or widowers) of
dead members. Imagine the dues!
;-D
- Scott
On 9/26/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
<Snip>
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Scott Marquardt
	Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 5:50 AM
	 
<Snip>
historical institutions its name reminds us of.
<Snip>
Agreed. In the case of the SCAA Roasters Guild the "we" that formed the
guild were professional roaster SCAA members and hence they formed "their"
guild accordingly.
Could or should those aspiring to learn the craft that don't work for a
professional roaster SCAA member be allowed to join at a reduced rate?
Something like a student or apprentice or even blatant home roaster
membership? Could seem appropriate. Little Googling other guilds finds the
National Lawyers Guild does have various membership types and rates.
Attorneys and Legal Workers $50, Law Students $15, and Jailhouse Lawyers NO
DUES.
I suspect that last membership type was not an original membership type but
brought about by said Jailhouse Lawyer category suing for membership rights.
I suppose the same could happen with the SCAA and it's guild with an
organized concerted campaign effort by home roasters and or home baristi.
But simply complaining about it on this List won't effect change. 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

4) From: Brett Mason
I think it is hilarious that SCAA is snooty about their membership, when
their own legions do not enjoy the same level of fresh coffee we enjoy.
The business of Specialty Coffee is to get somewhat fresh coffee out to
willing customers at a profit making price.  As long as there are willing
customers, the so-so coffee will continue.  And it will be mopuntain grown.
And it will be organic.  And it will most always be old.
We get better coffee, we are more acquainted with the details than most of
the people in SCAA, and we daily experience what most do not.
Do SCAA members
  cull their own beans,
  concern themselves with the details of green bean storage environment
  carefully manage their own roaster operation
  craft the further development of their roaster
  engineer bean cooling solutions
  develop and augment roasted bean storage systems
  manage specific rest times per bean
  develop and augment grinder solutions based upon specific brew method
  ensure proper temperature for brewing
  augment brewers to fully wet the beans
  manage bloom
  work through presentation in the cup
I don't believe so.
Do I draw my paycheck from Coffee?  No, that's their domain.  They SHOULD be
snooty.  Starbucks was the big host of Last Year's convention.  SOmething is
overbaked here....
We need a Jailhouse Coffee association...  Until then, this list and
Homeroasters.org do it for me...
Brett
On 9/27/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

5) From: Dan Bollinger
<Snip>
It would depend on their mission and what programs they choose to have.  In 
other words, company policy.
Dan

6) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I think the problem here is that many on this bbs think that the SCAA is =
about serving good coffee.  The SCAA's task is to be a trade =
organization first, purveyors of specialty coffee second.  As =
afficianados, we forget that (or chose to deny it), get the two =
reversed, and then judge the SCAA (or Roaster's Guild) accordingly.  =
It's not that the SCAA is not living up to their mission (and even if =
they weren't that's an issue for their members, not us non-members), but =
that we want to rewrite it!  
The solutions are simple.  If you want to change the SCAA, join them and =
propose changes as a member. Or, become an activist and demonstrate at =
their next event.  Or, let it be.   
Dan
  I think it is hilarious that SCAA is snooty about their membership, =
when their own legions do not enjoy the same level of fresh coffee we =
enjoy.
  The business of Specialty Coffee is to get somewhat fresh coffee out =
to willing customers at a profit making price.  As long as there are =
willing customers, the so-so coffee will continue.  And it will be =
mopuntain grown.  And it will be organic.  And it will most always be =
old. 
  We get better coffee, we are more acquainted with the details than =
most of the people in SCAA, and we daily experience what most do not.
  Do SCAA members 
    cull their own beans, 
    concern themselves with the details of green bean storage =
environment
    carefully manage their own roaster operation
    craft the further development of their roaster
    engineer bean cooling solutions
    develop and augment roasted bean storage systems
    manage specific rest times per bean
    develop and augment grinder solutions based upon specific brew =
method
    ensure proper temperature for brewing
    augment brewers to fully wet the beans
    manage bloom
    work through presentation in the cup
  I don't believe so. 
   
  Do I draw my paycheck from Coffee?  No, that's their domain.  They =
SHOULD be snooty.  Starbucks was the big host of Last Year's convention. =
 SOmething is overbaked here....
  We need a Jailhouse Coffee association...  Until then, this list and =
Homeroasters.org do it for me...
  Brett
   
  On 9/27/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote: 
    >>      From: homeroast-admin 
    [mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Scott =
Marquardt
           Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 5:50 AM
    >>      It seems to me that a guild is what we make of it, more than =
what 
    historical institutions its name reminds us of.
    >>
    Agreed. In the case of the SCAA Roasters Guild the "we" that formed =
the
    guild were professional roaster SCAA members and hence they formed =
"their" 
    guild accordingly.
    Could or should those aspiring to learn the craft that don't work =
for a
    professional roaster SCAA member be allowed to join at a reduced =
rate?
    Something like a student or apprentice or even blatant home roaster 
    membership? Could seem appropriate. Little Googling other guilds =
finds the
    National Lawyers Guild does have various membership types and rates.
    Attorneys and Legal Workers $50, Law Students $15, and Jailhouse =
Lawyers NO 
    DUES.
    I suspect that last membership type was not an original membership =
type but
    brought about by said Jailhouse Lawyer category suing for membership =
rights.
    I suppose the same could happen with the SCAA and it's guild with an =
    organized concerted campaign effort by home roasters and or home =
baristi.
    But simply complaining about it on this List won't effect change.
    Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
    URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: 
   http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm    Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know =
I must
    first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal =
enlightenment 
    found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone =
before.-- 
  Cheers,
  Brett
 http://homeroast.freeservers.com

7) From: Brett Mason
Guild for Coffee Roasting Professionals
Announces Apprenticeship Program
*Those Who Complete Apprentice and Journeyman Requirements Eligible for
Title of "Master Roaster"*
LONG BEACH, CA — The Roasters Guild announces the coffee industry's first
accreditation program for coffee roasters. A core principle of The Roasters
Guild is to provide educational opportunities to coffee roasters, and
present the craft and science of coffee roasting as a professional
occupation.
The educational component of the program provides training and instruction
on a broad range of coffee related topics. The accreditation component is a
formal qualification program that recognizes coffee knowledge, industry-wid=
e
expertise, and confers credentials at the completion and mastery of the
educational curriculum.
"We received a clear mandate from our membership that an individual
accreditation program was what The Roasters Guild should focus on," says
Mike Ebert, Chairman, The Roasters Guild Executive Council. "We have
identified a dynamic team of coffee professional to design a complete
program, build alliances with industry experts, and create an infrastructur=
e
within The Roasters Guild to implement this program."
"The Roasters Guild has a responsibility to both educate novice coffee
roasters, and continue the training of the experts in our field," adds
Spencer Turer, Accreditation Board Chairman. "We have designed a very
comprehensive curriculum, including practical training and educational
classes that will bring value to coffee roasters of every size and in every
segment of the industry."
The educational program will coordinate the collaborative efforts of The
Roasters Guild and The Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA) and
present a curriculum for coffee roasting, product testing, manufacturing,
farming and processing, and other coffee related topics. These educational
lessons will be presented at Roasters Guild events and at SCAA conferences
in the form of seminars, lectures, workshops, and also self-directed home
study. The course syllabus will be presented in graduating levels of
challenge with a logical progression of basic classes as prerequisites for
advanced topics.
The accreditation component is a multilevel program consisting of formal
testing and qualification designations. Candidates actively pursuing an
accreditation level will follow a specific course of study and evaluation,
while accredited roasters will be required to continue their educational an=
d
professional development to maintain their qualification level.
The Apprentice Roaster level is for individuals in the investigation phase
of their career. The Journeyman Roaster accreditation is for individuals wh=
o
are employed to roast coffee, and have completed the training required to
perform their job requirements. Classes at this level are designed to be
more challenging and of a higher educational level then the Apprentice. The
Master Roaster accreditation is for experienced, highly skilled coffee
roasters who are regarded as experts by their peers. This Master Roaster
accreditation level is designed to be particularly complex and multifaceted=
,
and requires substantial individual learning related to coffee,
manufacturing, and business topics.
"Our goal is to elevate the status of coffee roasters from skilled laborers
to skilled professionals; our desire is that the Master Roaster designation
enjoy the same recognition and honor that Master Chefs and Masters
Sommeliers receive," says Spencer Turer.
On 9/27/06, Dan Bollinger  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

8) From: Brett Mason
Note the phrase "We have designed a very comprehensive curriculum, includin=
g
practical training and educational classes that will bring value to coffee
roasters of every size and in every segment of the industry."
This does not apply to people who sell in a Farmer's Market - they're not
part of the industry.
You'll need to burn the tar out of the beans, then sell from a big store
with lots of cream and sugar - then you can apply...
On 9/27/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>
st
<Snip>
rs
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n
<Snip>
 a
<Snip>
ide
<Snip>
ure
<Snip>
ry
<Snip>
l
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
r
<Snip>
,
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and
<Snip>
e
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who
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he
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ed,
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?
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

9) From: Scott Marquardt
Are you serious?
On 9/27/06, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: miKe mcKoffee
Brett, simply because Starbucks is an SCAA member you seem to equate ALL
SCAA roaster members the same status. Seems rather narrow minded and lacking
any respect for the numerous professional Artisan roasters who do in fact
focus on quality and are often competing at Auction for the exact same
greens as Tom AND also form buying coops with Tom. And same said Artisan
roasters focus not only on quality greens but quality roasts and freshness.
Many roasting to order and shipping the same day roasted. No, I don't buy
from them choosing to roast my own, but that does not negate the quality and
care they practice in their craft. 
This type of bashing attitude from some home roasters towards anyone
professional roaster is one of the factors keeping the camps at odds.  
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>

11) From: Brett Mason
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0EIN/is_2005_Jan_25/ai_n8708216Yes, Starbucks was the Official Host Sponsor for SCAA 2005 in Seattle.
On 9/27/06, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

12) From: Brett Mason
I do apologize for keeping the camps at odds.
Sorry Camps,
Brett
On 9/27/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

13) From: Les
Well said Mike,
I used to be a basher too.  However I have experienced some very fine coffee
from places like Stumptown and Barefoot Roasters just to name two roasters.
I have also enjoyed ordering roasted coffee from the notorious commercial
roaster Thomas Owen at Sweet Maria's to do some comparing of my homeroast to
a commercial roast of the same bean.  There are some good roasters out there
among the many not so good.  I think it is time to develop good
relationships with the good roasters as well as the professional baristas
that are trying to refine the craft.  I know Chris Tacy moved me up the the
learning curve by miles, because of his candid concern for high quality
espresso.
Les
On 9/27/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Brett Mason
My intent is not to bash, and I do apologize for giving that sense.
The SCAA is an exclusive organization, for people in the business of
coffee.  People on list wanted to participate in some of the SCAA learning,
and have found that they cannot seem to get there.
My point is that most of the people on this list are highly qualified in
coffee.
In Cedar Rapids, two outlets do roast their own coffee, but the demand for
FRESH seemingly doesn't sustain these businesses very well.  Frankly the
roasted coffee is not all that good either - all the beans go through the
same profile (I asked).  Then they are stored until enough people buy the
beans to justify roasting a bunch more.
Most of the Cedar Rapids population (that will pay a good price for a decent
cup) are willing to accept whatever comes out of the machine into the paper
cup, filled with at least foamed milk, but more likely sweetened flavored
and foamed milk.  Often there is a Green Mermaid on the cup, but also there
are plain generic cups with similar liquid.  One shop has a barista who does
great latte art, and things with chocolate syrup.  The espresso is not very
good and the beans are old there...
My 40+ years in Orange County CA found similar results.
Sorry for getting frustrated and coming across as bashing...
Brett
On 9/27/06, Les  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

15) From: miKe mcKoffee
Frustration understood! SCAA learning events wise seems not so much that
those wishing to attend SCAA events can't but that they are required to pay,
same as SCAA members are required to pay to attend. 
Let's say I want to learn more about Thai cooking techniques. Why should I
have to pay for culinary school classes, why can't I just sit in and audit
them for free? Obvious answer. Seems somewhat parallel to me. I can learn
all I want about various cooking methods via books, TV shows, internet etc.
but if I want formal instruction it's gonna cost. 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
	Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 9:30 AM
	
<Snip>
	The SCAA is an exclusive organization, for people in the business of
coffee.  People on list wanted to participate in some of the SCAA learning,
and have found that they cannot seem to get there.
	 
	My point is that most of the people on this list are highly
qualified in coffee.
	 
	In Cedar Rapids, two outlets do roast their own coffee, but the
demand for FRESH seemingly doesn't sustain these businesses very well.
Frankly the roasted coffee is not all that good either - all the beans go
through the same profile (I asked).  Then they are stored until enough
people buy the beans to justify roasting a bunch more. 
	 
	Most of the Cedar Rapids population (that will pay a good price for
a decent cup) are willing to accept whatever comes out of the machine into
the paper cup, filled with at least foamed milk, but more likely sweetened
flavored and foamed milk.  Often there is a Green Mermaid on the cup, but
also there are plain generic cups with similar liquid.  One shop has a
barista who does great latte art, and things with chocolate syrup.  The
espresso is not very good and the beans are old there... 
	 
	My 40+ years in Orange County CA found similar results.
	 
	Sorry for getting frustrated and coming across as bashing...
	 
<Snip>

16) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Does anyone actually believe that the SCAA knows more about coffee
roasting/cupping and bean rating than all of us as a group(our hosts
included)? I haven't found the coffee question yet that someone on here
doesn't know the answer to. We are the experts of coffee roasting at
it's finest. When I first started posting I was terrified of the thought
that I would mess up all my greens and nothing would be drinkable but I
heard MANY times that pretty much as long as they don't catch fire they
will be better than anything that you can buy. So if that is the case
{follow the logic} our worst is better than *$ who is the expert? 
If you want to know more about cupping try it at home just read all the
info about the coffees you have (pay attention to the cupping info that
Tom writes) now get a little help (make it blind) then cup away try to
find as much as you can at various roast levels of each coffee you are
cupping. You may even find that your personal taste is different from
what the cupping review lists.
Just my thoughts... (bash away...LOL)
Dennis
AKA,
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True
CS-5 DSPO
CS Dept CC
CS Dept TRANO
Duty Sec 1 CS E6 S/L
CS Dept Mentorship Coordinator
 
"Life Liberty and the pursuit of all who threaten it..."

17) From: Les
What I think we are seeing is a paradigm shift taking place.  It is kind of
fun to be watching it happen.  I think the SCAA needs to be given a lot of
credit for what they have done in the past.  We wouldn't have the high
quality coffee we have today without the intervention of the SCAA.
However,  what they have created can not be contained or controlled by them
any longer.  People like Tom are changing the rules of the game.  The Cup of
Excellence venues in the various countries of origin are changing the game.
Before the SCAA there were a select few that controlled most of the coffee
greens in the world.  The SCAA said, that there is more than price, we need
quality, quality with control however.  With the Internet, homeroasting,
good independent roasters, a demand in some places for great coffee (the Bay
area, Portland, and Seattle have some great coffee shops that I know
about).  The Professional Baristas not putting up with poor coffee anymore
has contributed to their loss of control as well.  The SCAA can no longer
control the availability of high quality coffee.  They are going to have to
change, and I think they are changing.  I have 25 years of experience in
this game.  Twenty five years ago, you could hardly buy green coffee, let
alone coffee with a description like this: "So why is this lot "Maria
Especial"? Because we basically had a very good cupper (who I cannot name,
sorry!) pick and choose through all of the peaberry lots coming into the
respected Pastores mill in Antigua to create this coffee. Peaberry is a
small percentage of the harvest, and each farm might not have enough to
offer as a distinct exportable lot. So essentially our hired gun
"cherry-picked" the best of the best to create a lot just for us."  (Guatemala
Antigua Peaberry "Maria Especial")  Tom is a revolutionary.   VIVA LA
REVOLUTION!   Ten years ago if you went into a commercial roaster and
declared yourself a homeroaster you were looked on with disdain most of the
time.  The last 3 commercial shops I have walked into and declared myself,
have invited me to see their roasters and 2 asked me to cup their roasts and
offer suggestions.  We have come a long way!   We can thank the SCAA for
that, but I am sure they wish they still had more control than they do.
Les
On 9/27/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Jeremy DeFranco
I think this is a good conversation. I don't know  but it all seems to me
like a lot of assuming is going on. I mean someone posted an article that
said the Roaster's Guilds' goal is to educate those with ALL levels of
experience, but others still assume for some reason that the Roaster's guild
is just being "snooty". I am giving the Roasters' Guild the benefit of the
doubt for now, and assuming that the resources and organization right now
are just not there yet. For instance, if you go on the SCAA website, ANYONE
can buy "The Roasting Concepts" book. That doesn't seem snooty or elitist to
me. The problem is that the book is just an OUTLINE. It is just a bunch of
lecture power points that leave room for writing notes during an actual
lecture. What I think this means is that the roasters' guild or the SCAA IS
making an effort, but I think it is just a painfully slow process. They do
realize the demand is there, and they DO desire to meet that demand (AND
like Les said we have, within an instant arrived at a whole new meaning and
caliber of homeroasting). It's just that the SCAA doesn't have the
resources, the business savvy, the money, etc. to be able to meet the
rapidly growing homeroast demand as quickly as it is growing. I think this
is also, sadly, partly because of previous mismanagement/embezelment from
their former president. I really do hope that Roasters' Guild classes become
available for roasters of all levels of experience (including home
roasters), and I really think that it is only a matter of time. I think it
is a win-win situation for all, and I think they realize that. I would
certainly not mind paying for classes, as I would be happy to see that money
go to perpetuate great coffee (atleast to the best of the SCAA's abilities,
but hey, atleast they try). All would benefit- the SCAA, the Roasters'
Guild, and the coffee industry in general (as more educated roasters tend to
gravitate towards quality). Pardon me for further assuming.... Cheers!

19) From: Tom Bellhouse
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

20) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
To add a bit more to what I said below.....
 
I have yet to find "tobacco" or "papaya"  in any coffee but I better =
understand what Tom writes when I am looking for the next coffee to try. =
Maybe one day I will know Chocolate in coffee, but even if I don't, I =
now know what Brightness Vs. Acidity is I understand body I understand =
roast levels from City to Charcoal. All of this and so much more is from =
YOU Each and every one on this list who (just making a VERY Low ball =
guess) have a cumulative 200+ years of Roasting/Tasting experience. I =
thank you each and every one who over and over answers the same question =
about "why a new grinder over a new machine?" or "You really use a Dog =
Bowl?!?!?!?"  to "how many settings can you adjust to on your =
Rocky?"  or "you mean my *$ barista isn't one of the best espresso =
machines around?"   Thanks of course go out to SM for providing this =
wonderful forum to assist us in spreading the "gospel" and teaching =
others our passion. 
 
The SCAA and *$ knows more about marketing but knowing coffee is a =
passion and we have PASSION!!!! 
 
Ok getting wordy...I'll stop now...
 
Dennis

21) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
Near as I can tell, some folks are much annoyed that they can't belong to an
organization that charges too much, doesn't know what they are doing, is
composed of crass marketeers, lacks passion, yadda-yadda.  For those people,
I'd urge you to accept Groucho's advice, "[you] don't want to belong to any
club that will accept [you] as a member."  This has been a long thread, and
maybe  I've lost track of what people are griping about.
When I paid my nominal fee to become a C-member of SCAA, I offered to
consult with Starbucks, Folgers, Sweet Marias and anyone else who wanted to
glean the wisdom of an amateur,  5-years roaster and (self-appointed) Master
of the HG/DB.  It has been a couple of years since that offer, and I haven't
heard back.  I think their email is just slow.
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary

22) From: Les
Martin,
Many of us on the list have listened to you.  My second favorite
method of roasting after my RK is HG/DB roasting.  You have many
faithful disciples from the Sweet Marias list.  When I first heard of
your method, I wrote it off!  In many ways the HG/DB offers the most
flexiblity and control of any method.  Thanks for your hardwork and
teaching  many of us on the list your method.
Les
On 9/28/06, Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
 wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: Brian Kamnetz
I too am a convert. Actually, I started with a small Milwaukee heat
gun, went to poppers for a few years, and now am back to HG/DB, with a
Master Appliance HG-751B Heat Gun and various-sized colandars in a
stainless steel mixing bowl, which allow me to roast from 1/4 pound
all the way up to a whole pound. It's fun to have the flexibility.
So I, too, thank you and the others on this list who have offered me
advice and encouragement through the years.
Brian
On 9/28/06, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

24) From: raymanowen
My mileage does vary (MMDV), miKe-
"associations of merchants or craftman with the sole purpose of perfecting
and perpetuating their trades." [Conceived and originated in Medieval Times-
hence, probably came over on the Mayflower] -Chris called it Mutiny, and
would give 'em a close shave with his Wilkinson.
Given the Associations and Guilds to further the art and practice of The
Nectar of the Bean, exactly what in Blazes explains the sorry Dreck supplied
by the plethora of gas stations that call themselves Coffee Shops?
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Expecting Diamonds from a jewelry store...

25) From: miKe mcKoffee
<Snip>
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of
raymanowen
	Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 11:01 AM
	
<Snip>
The Nectar of the Bean, exactly what in Blazes explains the sorry Dreck
supplied by the plethora of gas stations that call themselves Coffee Shops? 
	Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
<Snip>
You really think such places belong to the SCAA Barista Guild? You can lead
a horse to water but you can't force them to drink...
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

26) From: Justin Marquez
On 9/29/06, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
If customers are coming in in droves and spending $$ for a
coffee-flavored milky, chocklatey drink, WHY WOULD THEY THINK THEY
WANT TO CHANGE?
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)


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