HomeRoast Digest


Topic: newbie question - rest time (16 msgs / 539 lines)
1) From: Bill and Tricia Ballad
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
I've been doing quite a bit of reading and experimenting with roasts, and am
probably suffering from information overload.  I've seen recommendations for
post-roast resting of anywhere from 4 hours to 3-4 days.  How long should I
let my newly roasted beans rest before enjoying them?  And so I can better
understand the concepts, is it something that depends on the particular
beans I'm roasting, or the local conditions (temp, humidity, etc.)?  
Thanks!
Tricia Ballad

2) From: DW Hutson
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Tricia:
Tom will almost always say in his description whether that particular =
coffee improves with a little rest. Most of the time, 24 hours is =
sufficient. Of course, I have often brewed coffee with ten minutes of =
rest, and it beat anything else I have ever had that was not freshly =
roasted! Don't ever wait to drink good coffee just because it hasn't =
rested if you have nothing else. If you wait three or four days you have =
a pretty short window of time to brew the coffee as most roasted beans =
start going stale at seven days, in my opinion.
Doug Hutson

3) From: Bill and Tricia Ballad
This is a multipart message in MIME format.
Thanks - that helps a lot.  I had started to wonder if I needed to ration my
rested beans (or go back and brew what I have left of the store-bought whole
bean).    I've been going through a lot of coffee lately - partially because
I just can't wait to try it and partially due to the sheer number of
deadlines that have invaded my calendar this month!
Tricia Ballad
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of DW Hutson
Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 9:31 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +newbie question - rest time
Tricia:
Tom will almost always say in his description whether that particular coffee
improves with a little rest. Most of the time, 24 hours is sufficient. Of
course, I have often brewed coffee with ten minutes of rest, and it beat
anything else I have ever had that was not freshly roasted! Don't ever wait
to drink good coffee just because it hasn't rested if you have nothing else.
If you wait three or four days you have a pretty short window of time to
brew the coffee as most roasted beans start going stale at seven days, in my
opinion.
Doug Hutson

4) From: miKe mcKoffee
Ideal rest for a particular coffee's peak flavor varies greatly depending on
roast level, method of roast, bean varietal, targeted brewing method, rest
storage method to name a few factors. While about all coffees will yield a
drinkable cup straight from roast, the taste will quite often dramatically
change various rest levels. Best thing you can do is determine what is best
for your roasts your brewing methods your choice of beans by tasting a roast
at ~12hr itervals out to at least 7 days. IMO many don't come to full flavor
complexity until 4 or 5 days rest, with 3 days being my target rest minimum
before usage any roast any bean.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Bill and Tricia
Ballad
	Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 7:06 AM
<Snip>
roasts, and am probably suffering from information overload.  I've seen
recommendations for post-roast resting of anywhere from 4 hours to 3-4 days.
How long should I let my newly roasted beans rest before enjoying them?  And
so I can better understand the concepts, is it something that depends on the
particular beans I'm roasting, or the local conditions (temp, humidity,
etc.)?  
	Thanks!
<Snip>

5) From: jim gundlach
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Tricia,
    One of the advantages of home roasting is you have the  
opportunity to learn the answer to this question on your own.  And  
you can learn it for each bean you roast on a regular basis.  Some  
beans even offer an adventure of changing flavors during the first  
few days.
     Pecan Jim
On Sep 29, 2006, at 9:05 AM, Bill and Tricia Ballad wrote:
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Tricia,† †One of the =
advantages of home roasting is you have the†opportunity to learn the =
answer to this question on your own.† And you can learn it for each =
bean you roast on a regular basis.† Some beans even offer an adventure =
of changing flavors during the first few days.†† †Pecan =
Jim
On Sep 29, 2006, at 9:05 AM, Bill and Tricia Ballad =
wrote:

Iíve been = doing quite a bit of reading and experimenting with roasts, and am = probably suffering from information overload.† Iíve seen = recommendations for post-roast resting of anywhere from 4 hours to 3-4 = days.† How long should I let my newly roasted beans rest before = enjoying them?† And so I can better understand the concepts, is it = something that depends on the particular beans Iím roasting, or the = local conditions (temp, humidity, etc.)?†

Thanks!
Tricia = Ballad = --Apple-Mail-3-846489308--


6) From: Michael Holland
Tricia,
The bottom line seems to be that there are NO wrong
answers here. It's all subjective to your palate,
excluding some science and technique that I won't
pretend to understand.
But, counter to our mothers, this is one instance
where playing with our food is not only encouraged but
necessary. 
This advice is worth every single penny you paid for
it, BTW :)
Michael Holland
Los Angeles City Archives
VP, Cellarmasters
"In the vault, no one can hear you scream"

7) From: Bill and Tricia Ballad
Thanks for the advice everybody - sometimes I think we get too caught up in
trying to do things "right" that we forget the element of play!
Tricia Ballad

8) From: Eddie Dove
"... sometimes I think we get too caught up in trying to do things "right"
that we forget the element of play!"
Well said ...
Eddie
On 9/29/06, Bill and Tricia Ballad  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Les
Tricia,
Let me give you two examples of rest time differences:  First if you follow
Mike McKoffee's advice with Uganda Bugisu you will never experience the rich
chocolate flavor that is experienced from 4 hours through about 24.  On the
other extreme, the pacamara beans (a new cross from central america
currently Tom is offering a peaberry, Nicaragua Matagalpa - Pacamara
Peaberry) are unremarkable until the third or fourth day when you get a
flavor explosion!  Something to remember because I think one of the new
CoE's that will be coming is a pacamara   Remember what non-homeroast tastes
like and you can smile knowing that if you have enjoyed your coffee a bit
too soon or even let it go a bit too long it is better than anything you
could buy in the store.  I am finding that with proper storage some of the
coffees are still very good 14 days out.
Les
On 9/29/06, Bill and Tricia Ballad  wrote:
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10) From: Vicki Smith
I generally make single cups of whatever I have newly roasted until I 
get the wow factor, and then I will make a full pot (of whatever really 
is ready) for our 40 ounce AM guzzle. That is how I excuse my 5 AM gotta 
have it behaviour when the full pot activity really shouldn't start for 
another 45 minutes, when the big guy gets up.
v
Les wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Tom Bellhouse
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Agreed.  There's not a thing wrong with samplign your roast after 4 =
hours, or 8, or 1 day.  It's all about learning.  
I still maintain that no cup of coffee can be duplicated.  In other =
words, no matter how detailed my roast profile, resting time, and =
brewing vairables are controlled, thay aren't sufficient to duplicate =
the flavor of an earlier cup from the same batch of beans, no matter how =
hard I try  So you gotta' enjoy each cup of each roast for itself, =
because there'll never be another just like it!
Tom in GA.

12) From: Brett Mason
ALWAYS pull at least one shot after the roast, roughly immediately.
  OR one cup
  OR one Presspot
  OR one Mokkapot
This is just a rule I try to follow...
Brett
On 9/29/06, Les  wrote:
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-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

13) From: miKe mcKoffee
Actually my advise was for they themselves to try each roast of each bean at
~12hr intervals from roast to at least 7 days out. I then followed with what
was my common practice.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Les
	Sent: Friday, September 29, 2006 12:47 PM
	
<Snip>
	Let me give you two examples of rest time differences:  First if you
follow Mike McKoffee's advice with Uganda Bugisu you will never experience
the rich chocolate flavor that is experienced from 4 hours through about 24.
On the other extreme, the pacamara beans (a new cross from central america
currently Tom is offering a peaberry,  Nicaragua Matagalpa - Pacamara
Peaberry) are unremarkable until the third or fourth day when you get a
flavor explosion!  Something to remember because I think one of the new
CoE's that will be coming is a pacamara   Remember what non-homeroast tastes
like and you can smile knowing that if you have enjoyed your coffee a bit
too soon or even let it go a bit too long it is better than anything you
could buy in the store.  I am finding that with proper storage some of the
coffees are still very good 14 days out. 
	 
<Snip>

14) From: Sandy Andina
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In my house, optimal rest time depends on whether I can catch my  
husband, son and son's girlfriend before they sneak into the jar to  
grind the freshly roasted beans. I'm lucky if I can get them to keep  
their paws off the Harar for 12 hrs. post-roast!
On Sep 29, 2006, at 9:59 AM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
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Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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In my house, optimal rest time =
depends on whether I can catch my husband, son and son's girlfriend =
before they sneak into the jar to grind the freshly roasted beans. I'm =
lucky if I can get them to keep their paws off the Harar for 12 hrs. =
post-roast!On Sep 29, 2006, at 9:59 AM, miKe mcKoffee =
wrote:
Ideal rest for a particular = coffee's peak flavor varies greatly depending onroast level, method of roast, bean varietal, = targeted brewing method, reststorage = method to name a few factors.† = = --Apple-Mail-28-872874885--

15) From: Lynne
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Wow - you said it. I totally agree!
Lynne
On Sep 29, 2006, at 3:58 PM, Tom Bellhouse wrote:
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other 
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itself, 
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--Apple-Mail-10-884478283
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Wow - you said it. I totally agree!
Lynne
On Sep 29, 2006, at 3:58 PM, Tom Bellhouse wrote:
HelveticaAgreed.† There's
not a thing wrong with samplign your roast after 4 hours, or 8, or 1
day.† It's all about learning.†
†
HelveticaI still maintain
that†no†cup of coffee can be duplicated.† In other words, no =
matter
how detailed my roast profile, resting time, and brewing vairables are
controlled, thay aren't sufficient to duplicate the flavor of an
earlier†cup from the same batch of beans, no matter how hard†I try† =
So
you gotta' enjoy each cup of each roast for itself, because there'll
never be another just like it!
†
HelveticaTom in =
GA.†
=
--Apple-Mail-10-884478283--

16) From: Gregg Talton
Exactly!  I experienced this yesterday.  We've had a house guest and have
have been going through a lot of coffee mostly brewing my homeroast at about
24-28 hours rest.  Well, our house guest returned to Alabama and the
Honduras Pacamara beans reached three days of rest.  So, into the thermos
went my coffee yesterday and when it was time to have my coffee and chart
(I'm a RN) I was blown away - great coffee!  It was good at 24 hours but
it's great at 48 and I can't wait to have some in a few minutes to see how
it has contunied to develop.
Gregg T
On 9/29/06, Les  wrote:
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