HomeRoast Digest


Topic: newb (14 msgs / 338 lines)
1) From: STP
I'm a newb to the home roasting club.  Received my first roaster, iRoast 1,
on Friday and roasted my first batch Monday night.  I bought a 2lb sampler
from Tom and roasted the Nicaragua Limoncillo Estate - Var. Java to a City
Roast using the roast profile Tom suggested on his tip sheet for the iRoast:
340 for 2 minutes --this will give you a high speed air pattern to aid in
really even initial heat distribution
390 or 400 for 3 minutes -- this raises the temperature right to the verge
of first crack
450 for 4 to 6 minutes -- with most coffees, 4 minutes will give you a City
Roast, 5 a Full City, and 6 gets you to the door of 2nd crack.
With great apprehension, my wife and I tried our first brew (Cuisinart drip
brew with gold wire mesh filter, ground using blade GE grinder (have a
1920's glass hand crank grinder that I'm restoring for future use) this
morning.  We both drink our coffee straight up and were wondering if we'd
notice a difference from our usual brand (whole bean Gevalia).  All it took
was one sip and we were absolutely blown away!  Who knew coffee had so much
flavor! One hasn't truly lived until one has had fresh roasted coffee!  I
can't wait until tomorrow morning!
My wife and I are now self-professed members of the twelve step program for
CSA!  Thank you Tom for your wonderful coffee, you have opened our eyes.
Kevin and Rayna

2) From: Eddie Dove
Kevin and Rayna,
Welcome to the list and CSA!
I do hope you realize that you will never be able to go back!
Resepctfully,
Eddie
On 10/3/06, STP  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Les
Welcome Kevin and Rayna.  I was a bit worried at your first sip of
homeroast!  You picked one of the harder beans to roast (narrow sweet spot)
to start with.  It is one of my favorites.  I would suggest an upgrade to a
better grinder.  If I were only doing drip one of the conical grinders in
the 100-200 range would move you to an even higher level of coffee Nirvana.
If you are planning on going to espresso at some time in the future, a
Rancilio Rocky would be a great investment or the Mazzer Mini.  It is hard
to over emphasis the importance of a good even grind especially with the
gold mesh filter.
Les aka Dr. Crema
On 10/3/06, STP  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Welcome to the List and enjoy the Journey! Bbbbutttttttttt, Beware the
Slippery Slope! Short rested, whirly chopped and drip brewed yields "we were
absolutely blown away". Nowhere to go but gets even better:-)
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee 
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm
Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of STP
Sent: Tuesday, October 03, 2006 12:32 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +newb
I'm a newb to the home roasting club.  Received my first roaster, iRoast 1,
on Friday and roasted my first batch Monday night.  I bought a 2lb sampler
from Tom and roasted the Nicaragua Limoncillo Estate - Var. Java to a City
Roast using the roast profile Tom suggested on his tip sheet for the iRoast:
340 for 2 minutes --this will give you a high speed air pattern to aid in
really even initial heat distribution
390 or 400 for 3 minutes -- this raises the temperature right to the verge
of first crack 
450 for 4 to 6 minutes -- with most coffees, 4 minutes will give you a City
Roast, 5 a Full City, and 6 gets you to the door of 2nd crack. 
With great apprehension, my wife and I tried our first brew (Cuisinart drip
brew with gold wire mesh filter, ground using blade GE grinder (have a
1920's glass hand crank grinder that I'm restoring for future use) this
morning.  We both drink our coffee straight up and were wondering if we'd
notice a difference from our usual brand (whole bean Gevalia).  All it took
was one sip and we were absolutely blown away!  Who knew coffee had so much
flavor! One hasn't truly lived until one has had fresh roasted coffee!  I
can't wait until tomorrow morning!  
 
My wife and I are now self-professed members of the twelve step program for
CSA!  Thank you Tom for your wonderful coffee, you have opened our eyes.
 
Kevin and Rayna
 

5) From: raymanowen
Thirty years ago, I thought I knew everything about coffee. I was buying
really fresh roasted beans from Boyer's, and Bill even sold me a Melitta
AromaRoast with a couple of pounds of green Kenya AA for around $15- as if I
really remember the exact price??!!...
Although people in my shop really went nuts when I brewed the fresh roasted
coffee, I didn't. When I'd roast, it was a total dice roll as to what
resulted. I thought the smoke and popping sound meant I was incinerating the
beans.
I had to take off the cover to see the beans at all, and when they looked
like coffee I quit. Of course, the chaff had taken flight!
Nothing. I knew nothing- and Celestica gave me lots of time for self-paced
study a few years ago. Since I have all the time, I'm in the  < Learn > mode
too.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
When the only tool you have is a hammer, all problems begin to resemble
nails. . .
Abraham Maslow 

6) From: javafool
Welcome Kevin and Rayna,
Amazing how only one cup can change your coffee drinking experience for
life, isn't it?
Terry

7) From: Tim Wat
javafool wrote:
<Snip>
Agreed, Terry.
I just started roasting this year, having stumbled across Tom and 
Maria's site through Google.
But this is a precariously slippery slope of dissatisfaction.  I started 
with a popper, which led to a variac.  But darn that DC fan motor - I 
can tell you first hand what happens when you try to separate heater 
circuit from fan circuit and feed the fan 120VAC. 
So the craving for larger roasts led to a SC/CO - which of course 
required a spacer, silicon tubing rim, small kitchen scale, digital 
thermometer, barrier strips for the agitating arms, cooling device to 
immediately stop the roast.  Little borosilicate jars to hold roasted 
beans.  And a new burr grinder.  Only to find out the burr grinder 
produces quite a bit of fine dust along with the grind - so much for 
burr grinders on the cheap from Costco.  Been eyeing that Kitchenaid 
ProLine....
And the roasts!  I'm still trying to get one roast to match the second.  
Taking measurements, timing, weighing...I think I'm getting closer, but 
every variable opens the door to infinite permutations. 
Then add to that all these different beans to sample.  Malawi Mapanga 
Estate.  Brasilian COE.  FT Organic Yirg.  Kenyan AA.  Tom's sampler 
packs.  And now I'm yearning to get into espresso and find myself 
lusting after a good machine.
What's the net result?  I don't know if anyone else has run into the 
same issue I have...but mainly, I'm so much more caffeinated nowadays 
I'm having trouble sleeping.
Tim

8) From: Nathan Solmose
I remember that feeling...Welcome! You are going to be so obssesed over the 
next few months with trying every region of the world
<Snip>

9) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
WHOO HOO!!!! ..."now I'm a believer!... "
Welcome Aboard... CSA will always accept new snobs!
Dennis
 
 
 
I'm a newb to the home roasting club.  Received my first roaster, iRoast
1, on Friday and roasted my first batch Monday night.  I bought a 2lb
sampler from Tom and roasted the Nicaragua Limoncillo Estate - Var. Java
to a City Roast using the roast profile Tom suggested on his tip sheet
for the iRoast: 
340 for 2 minutes --this will give you a high speed air pattern to aid
in really even initial heat distribution
390 or 400 for 3 minutes -- this raises the temperature right to the
verge of first crack 
450 for 4 to 6 minutes -- with most coffees, 4 minutes will give you a
City Roast, 5 a Full City, and 6 gets you to the door of 2nd crack. 
With great apprehension, my wife and I tried our first brew (Cuisinart
drip brew with gold wire mesh filter, ground using blade GE grinder
(have a 1920's glass hand crank grinder that I'm restoring for future
use) this morning.  We both drink our coffee straight up and were
wondering if we'd notice a difference from our usual brand (whole bean
Gevalia).  All it took was one sip and we were absolutely blown away!
Who knew coffee had so much flavor! One hasn't truly lived until one has
had fresh roasted coffee!  I can't wait until tomorrow morning!  
 
My wife and I are now self-professed members of the twelve step program
for CSA!  Thank you Tom for your wonderful coffee, you have opened our
eyes.
 
Kevin and Rayna
 

10) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
Oh but such a wonderful feeling knowing you are your own reason for not
sleeping!!!!! 
I love a good Caffeine buzz to get me going!!!
Dennis
What's the net result?  I don't know if anyone else has run into the 
same issue I have...but mainly, I'm so much more caffeinated nowadays 
I'm having trouble sleeping.
Tim

11) From: Eddie Dove
Tim said, "And the roasts!  I'm still trying to get one roast to match the
second.  Taking measurements, timing, weighing...I think I'm getting closer,
but every variable opens the door to infinite permutations."
This is one of the things I have learned to LOVE, which is so contrary to my
normal personality, which some have referred to as OCD and other
adjectives.  In any other undertaking, I would be trying to precisely
duplicate what I had done before.  With the coffee, if I find a roast that I
really like, I will try to duplicate it, but I don't worry about being
exact.  I find myself enjoying chasing after the nuances ... those suttle
little differences thats makes all of this so awesome!
Yes, one can find happiness in the little things ...
Eddie
On 10/3/06, Tim Wat  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: raymanowen
Tim- What's up with- "I'm so much more caffeinated nowadays I'm having
trouble sleeping??"  I don't know from caffeine, but this accidental blend
of Ethiopian Green Stripe with Mexican Chiapas (25g + 25g) is an
unrepeatable cup I'm enjoying right now.
This is from the last 1/3rd of a 20 cup brew in the Technivorm- I really
stretched it out by stalling the drip about a minute at a time. This is
incredible. I was going to dump the last pot if it was overextracted.
ABSOLUTELY
NOT!
Both rested 30 hours then cooled in the freezer for 20 minutes before
grinding at a 52 setting. I used to never mix origins. The outcome of my
desperation and errors of mixing origins has caused me to rethink former
assumptions.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Burning all the Big Coffee bridges-
On 10/3/06, Nathan Solmose  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Contemporary Candles
Hi, Kevin and Rayna!  My husband and I are newbies too -- we're lurking 
here on the list, trying to learn as much as we can.  I'm Wendi and my 
husband (who actually is the coffee roaster in the house) is Dave.  (Yes, 
another Dave!)
We went through the same thing -- the "Oh my gosh, what have we been 
missing?!" feeling.  :-)  We used to drink our coffee with lots of flavored 
creamer -- that was the first thing to go when Dave started roasting his 
own beans.  
I kind of humored him when he stumbled on the Sweet Maria's site (I think 
it was from a Squidoo page) and said he wanted to roast his own coffee.  I 
thought it would be really difficult to do, and he'd lose interest pretty 
quickly.  After I tasted my first cup of home-roasted coffee, I jumped on 
the site and started reading and I'm hooked too!
I know he's going to do scary things to our popcorn popper pretty 
soon...this is a man who took his own hearing aids apart to modify them!  :D
~ Wendi & Dave, in Illinois

14) From: Justin Marquez
On 10/4/06, Contemporary Candles  wrote:
<Snip>
What...? What...?  What...?
Seriously, welcome to the club!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)


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