HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Hottop escapades (2 msgs / 50 lines)
1) From: Bob Brashear
I purchased the Hottop (digital) from our gracious host in late August. 
Since then, I've put 45 pounds of coffee through it (12 varieties).
My typical setup is to put the max amount of time on the machine and let 
er rip. Depending on the roast required, I use a combination of time, 
smell, sound and very little sight. That surprised me. I thought I would 
rely on sight. I mostly look for smoke production. Using those combos, I 
have nailed most of the roasts. I still like to sit and watch the beans 
change through the process. And yes, I sit by the machine whenever it is on.
Some patterns I have noticed are a definite pause between cracks and 
first crack begins usually at 385 deg F. A lot of stuff I've read says 
there may be little pause between cracks. Haven't encountered that yet. 
The good stuff starts to happen with around 5 minutes left and it does 
so with consistency. I've had to add time once (60 seconds) to a roast.
I roast in my kitchen. Smoke production is present, though from the 
reviews I expected noxious clouds. I do use the exhaust fan occasionally 
at the Full City and above stages. I don't go there very often. All 
agree that the house smells wonderful.
Word is out that I roast coffee and people are ordering from me. The 
fencing club that my son is a member of is ordering pounds per week. I 
am starting to sked get-togethers and people are excited.
This is fun. Wish I had found you people a lot earlier.
The Hottop is a good machine. I've had one minor problem that Tara 
Kollos and others helped out with.
Bob

2) From: Tara Kollas
Good to hear you like the Hottop - I've had mine about a year and a half now
and really like it.  The only issue I had was the squeaking and that's
fixed.  Occasionally you might get a bean that catches in the dumping chute,
so the next time you put in your green beans they automatically eject.  The
first time it happened, I about flipped.  Then I looked inside with the
flashlight and saw the culprit.  So if this ever happens to you, just take
out the drum and look inside, there's probably a bean stuck in the back.
The beans were barely warmed by the trip through the drum, so I didn't lose
anything but a few minutes time.
On 10/3/06, Bob Brashear  wrote:
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