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Topic: chocolate hiding in the Aeropress? (9 msgs / 198 lines)
1) From: Zara Haimo
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I've been using my aeropress to make a coffee concentrate that I chill =
and then mix with cold milk for a refreshing drink.  No matter what bean =
or roast level I've used in the aeropress, the dominant taste I've been =
getting is chocolate.  I'm not complaining - it's really delicious - but =
sometimes the chocolate taste has been so intense that I really thought =
I had made a particularly good cup of chocolate milk and not coffee at =
all.
Has anyone else had a similar experience with the aeropress?

2) From: Claus Thøgersen
Hi Zara,
I do not make the same drink you do from the AP, but I have a somewhat 
similar concern, that the brewing method does not accent differences in the 
specific coffee you brew, but like a stove top coffee maker makes a brew 
with certain dominant trades. And sweetness and cchocolate is also what I 
get in my AP coffee, a drink much like Americano.
This just to say that we need many different brewers to get the most variaty 
out of the homeroasted coffee we have.
Claus Thøgersen
maker highten the
----- Oprindelig meddelelse ----- 
Fra: "Zara Haimo" 
Til: 
Sendt: 4. oktober 2006 20:25
Emne: +chocolate hiding in the Aeropress?
I've been using my aeropress to make a coffee concentrate that I chill and 
then mix with cold milk for a refreshing drink.  No matter what bean or 
roast level I've used in the aeropress, the dominant taste I've been getting 
is chocolate.  I'm not complaining - it's really delicious - but sometimes 
the chocolate taste has been so intense that I really thought I had made a 
particularly good cup of chocolate milk and not coffee at all.
Has anyone else had a similar experience with the aeropress?

3) From: Brian Kamnetz
Zara,
That sounds really interesting. Have you ever tried the coffee
concentrate/milk combo heated up? I'm wondering how much it might
taste like hot chocolate, or, better yet, might be a coffee
alternative to hot chocolate.
brian
On 10/4/06, Zara Haimo  wrote:
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4) From: Zara Haimo
<Snip>
I've drunk the aeropress concentrate mixed with hot water as a sort of
Americano, but I haven't tried using hot milk yet.  I usually use my Giotto
to make wonderful lattes and just use the aeropress for Saturday when I
can't make hot espresso drinks.  I also just got the aeropress and am still
experimenting to see how it fits in my mix of coffee options.  I'll have to
give hot milk with aeropress concentrate a try one day during the week.

5) From: Sheila Quinn
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No, but that makes me want to get an Aeropress after all, chocolate 
lover that I am. I keep telling myself I don't need one, but maybe I do. :)
Sheila
Zara Haimo wrote:
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No, but that makes me want to get an Aeropress after all, chocolate
lover that I am. I keep telling myself I don't need one, but maybe I
do. :)
Sheila
Zara Haimo wrote:
  
  
  
  I've been using my aeropress to make
a coffee concentrate that I chill and then mix with cold milk for a
refreshing drink.  No matter what bean or roast level I've used in the
aeropress, the dominant taste I've been getting is chocolate.  I'm not
complaining - it's really delicious - but sometimes the chocolate taste
has been so intense that I really thought I had made a particularly
good cup of chocolate milk and not coffee at all.
   
  Has anyone else had a similar
experience with the aeropress?
--------------080701070603040004080708--

6) From: Scott Marquardt
Sometimes specialty coffee's cultivation, production, preparation and
consumption are compared with the rich tradition wine lovers have to draw
on. Temperature matters a lot with wine (they tell me), and I've learned
that it does with coffee as well.
For iced coffee, I always recommend that people make it strong, then sip it.
That is, take in an amount of brew that matches the amount of saliva in the
mouth at just that moment.  A "sip" by this standard, then, is a quantity of
beverage which will be diluted 50% by saliva in the mouth.
I then urge that people let the brew warm to the mouth's natural temperature
before swallowing. As I sometimes phrase it, this "wakes up" the aromatics
that were "put into hibernation" when the brew was iced. I really do believe
this is what happens -- the aromatics are preserved by cooling and
volatilized by warming again.
This view could be lame pseudoscience, but it matches my experience as an
iced coffee fanatic. I find iced coffee to offer amazing aromatic
experiences when treated this way.
Bringing that to the current question, maybe the chocolate notes are simple
more transparent to the palate and cooler temperatures; if the coffee is
swallowed too soon the balance of aromatics will not be experienced. Another
possibility is that rapid consumption results in a chilled palate, which may
be anaesthetised to some aromatics.
Just a thought.
On 10/4/06, Zara Haimo  wrote:
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7) From: Scott Marquardt
Aargh. "simply more transparent," and also I didn't mean to exclude
non-aromatic flavor elements, regarding possible "anaesthetising" effects of
a chilled palate.
On 10/5/06, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
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8) From: Zara Haimo
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<Snip>
simple more transparent to the palate and cooler temperatures; if the =
coffee is swallowed too soon the balance of aromatics will not be =
experienced. Another possibility is that rapid consumption results in a =
chilled palate, which may be anaesthetised to some aromatics. 
Great analysis, thanks!  Your ideas definitely make sense and track well =
with my experience of a strong chocolate taste no matter which bean or =
roast level I put through the aeropress.  Since I lose all the other =
flavors except chocolate, I'll probably use my least interesting beans =
for iced coffee with milk in the future.

9) From: Scott Marquardt
Actually, that's not a bad strategy. For my part, I like to see what all
kinds of coffee are like on ice, and I generally do get all those
distinctive flavors (I use the Aero pretty exclusively). But I've also been
known to drink enough iced that it become less a luxury beverage than a
commodity at times (on a hot day, instead of iced tea to quench thirst for
example), that why not just use some good "house roast" that I'm not sitting
around ruminating on its subtleties, etc.
- Scott
On 10/6/06, Zara Haimo  wrote:
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-- 
Scott


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