HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Preserving the bean (13 msgs / 420 lines)
1) From: Chuck Acridge
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I bought 5 lb. of my favorite Costa Rican bean.  Bought quantity for  
the savings in postage. They came in one plastic bag.  Should I  
divide them up in smaller bags when I open it?  Will last me months.   
What's the best way to keep them fresh?  Store in freezer?  Have a  
small vacuum container from Sharper Image- will hold maybe a couple  
pounds.
By the way, I'm roasting with stovetop popcorn popper, and with a  
little experimentation, works great.  Mainly watch the color, keep  
the beans moving over low heat, (combination of turning the blade and  
shaking the popper.  I'm holding it over the flame (gas stove) most  
of the time, not sitting on the stovetop.  Remove to colander a  
couple minutes before they're the color I want.  My grinder is a $10  
Procter Silex, which to my taste does just fine.
Chuck
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I=
 bought 5 lb. of my favorite Costa Rican bean.  Bought quantity for =
the savings in postage. They came in one plastic bag.  Should I divide =
them up in smaller bags when I open it?  Will last me months.  =
What's the best way to keep them fresh?  Store in freezer? =
 Have a small vacuum container from Sharper Image- will hold maybe a =
couple pounds.  
By the way, I'm roasting = with stovetop popcorn popper, and with a little experimentation, works = great.  Mainly watch the color, keep the beans moving over low heat, = (combination of turning the blade and shaking the popper.  I'm holding = it over the flame (gas stove) most of the time, not sitting on the = stovetop.  Remove to colander a couple minutes before they're the = color I want.  My grinder is a $10 Procter Silex, which to my taste = does just fine.  
Chuck= --Apple-Mail-1--760083570--

2) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
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Chuck,
It is my understanding that you do NOT have to take any special care to =
store with green beans. I have had over 30 lbs in the pantry at times. =
However, once you roast them then care is needed to keep oxygen away. I =
simply keep mine in a sealed container or a plastic bag with a one-way =
valve. I do NOT put them under a vacuum. The main thing is I only roast =
enough for 4 to 7 days max.
I am sure others will correct me or offer differing opinions if the 
they feel I am in error.  Although I have been roasting for 2 1/2 yr 
(Zach & Dani) I have only found this list about a week ago and I have 
lots to learn. I am waiting for the arrival of the iRoast2 at Sweet 
Maria's do I can try that roaster as the Z&D is starting to have 
sporadic problems.
dave
On Oct 5, 2006, at 2:20 PM, Chuck Acridge wrote:
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divide 
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What's 
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the 
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of 
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Procter 
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Chuck,
It is my understanding that you do NOT have to take any special care
to store with green beans. I have had over 30 lbs in the pantry at
times. However, once you roast them then care is needed to keep oxygen
away. I simply keep mine in a sealed container or a plastic bag with a
one-way valve. I do NOT put them under a vacuum. The main thing is I
only roast enough for 4 to 7 days max. 
I am sure others will correct me or offer differing opinions if the
they feel I am in error.  Although I have been roasting for 2 1/2 yr
(Zach & Dani) I have only found this list about a week ago and I have
lots to learn. I am waiting for the arrival of the iRoast2 at Sweet
Maria's do I can try that roaster as the Z&D is starting to have
sporadic problems.
dave
On Oct 5, 2006, at 2:20 PM, Chuck Acridge wrote:
I bought 5 lb. of my favorite Costa Rican bean.  Bought
quantity for the savings in postage. They came in one plastic bag. 
Should I divide them up in smaller bags when I open it?  Will last me
months.  What's the best way to keep them fresh?  Store
in freezer?  Have a small vacuum container from Sharper Image- will
hold maybe a couple pounds.  
By the way, I'm roasting with stovetop popcorn popper, and with a
little experimentation, works great.  Mainly watch the color, keep the
beans moving over low heat, (combination of turning the blade and
shaking the popper.  I'm holding it over the flame (gas stove) most of
the time, not sitting on the stovetop.  Remove to colander a couple
minutes before they're the color I want.  My grinder is a $10 Procter
Silex, which to my taste does just fine.  
Chuck=
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3) From: ConradArms
There are lots of ways to store green beans as you will read.  I've  been 
roasting for 3 years.  I store my green beans in paper bags or SM  cloth bags.  I 
put approx. 1/2 to 3/4 pounds in each bag.  I have  never had any problem 
doing it this way.  I keep the green beans in a  cupboard that is free from light 
and heat....Dorothy  

4) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 10/5/06, Chuck Acridge  wrote:
My grinder is a $10 Procter Silex, which to my taste does just
<Snip>
I used a $20 Krups grinder for a long time, until I finally decided
that the people on this list might be on to something, and I got a
Zass 169DG from Tom and Maria. The memory of the first cup from the
first batch ground with the Zass will be with me always.
Brian

5) From: Eddie Dove
Chuck,
Go to the Sweet Maria's website and scroll to the bottom.  In the search
window, type "green bean storage" and execute the search.  The results will
answer your questions and explain to you why you need to store it that way.
Hope this helps ...
Eddie
On 10/5/06, Chuck Acridge  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Brett Mason
Brian, you're just making it up.  How can a grinder make any difference at
all?
Brett
  Zassman
On 10/5/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

7) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
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I just went tohttp://www.sweetmarias.com/greenstorage.htmland read the following:
"....
The best storage conditions for raw coffee probably exist down in your =
basement, or another part of the house that is not subject to large 
shifts in temperature and humidity. If you do not plan to use your 
Sweet Maria's coffee within a month, pour the coffee from its ziplock 
bag into an ordinary kraft paper bag and label it. If you have cotton 
cloth or burlap bags, use them. Coffee needs to breathe so moisture 
cannot condense around it, so don't lock it up in an airtight vault, 
tomb or cedar chest. Direct sunlight is not good either. There are bugs =
or larvae that might be attracted to the burlap or cotton - but almost =
nothing will eat green coffee. If the coffee gets wet - you can get 
mold.
...."
Although I have had no noticeable problems storing my coffee in the 
large plastic bags they were shipped in I will switch to the collection =
of burlap bags I have. The only  disadvantage of the burlap bags is 
beans can escape the top opening as it cannot be closed completely.
If I am not noticing any moisture build up problems in the plastic bags =
in my pantry should I really bother to switch to the burlap bags?
dave
On Oct 5, 2006, at 4:05 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
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The 
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On Oct 5, 2006, at 2:32 PM, Dave Ehrenkranz wrote:
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for 
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months.  
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a 
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$10 
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I just went tohttp://www.sweetmarias.com/greenstorage.htmland read the following:
"....
The best storage conditions for raw coffee probably exist down in your
basement, or another part of the house that is not subject to large
shifts in temperature and humidity. If you do not plan to use your
Sweet Maria's coffee within a month, pour the coffee from its ziplock
bag into an ordinary kraft paper bag and label it. If you have cotton
cloth or burlap bags, use them. Coffee needs to breathe so moisture
cannot condense around it, so don't lock it up in an airtight vault,
tomb or cedar chest. Direct sunlight is not good either. There are
bugs or larvae that might be attracted to the burlap or cotton - but
almost nothing will eat green coffee. If the coffee gets wet - you can
get mold.
...."
Although I have had no noticeable problems storing my coffee in the
large plastic bags they were shipped in I will switch to the
collection of burlap bags I have. The only  disadvantage of the burlap
bags is beans can escape the top opening as it cannot be closed
completely. 
If I am not noticing any moisture build up problems in the plastic
bags in my pantry should I really bother to switch to the burlap bags?
dave
On Oct 5, 2006, at 4:05 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
Chuck,
Go to the Sweet Maria's website and scroll to the bottom.  In the
search window, type "green bean storage" and execute the search.  The
results will answer your questions and explain to you why you need to
store it that way.
On Oct 5, 2006, at 2:32 PM, Dave Ehrenkranz wrote:
Chuck,
It is my understanding that you do NOT have to take any special care
to store with green beans. I have had over 30 lbs in the pantry at
times. However, once you roast them then care is needed to keep oxygen
away. I simply keep mine in a sealed container or a plastic bag with a
one-way valve. I do NOT put them under a vacuum. The main thing is I
only roast enough for 4 to 7 days max. 
I am sure others will correct me or offer differing opinions if the
they feel I am in error.  Although I have been roasting for 2 1/2 yr
(Zach & Dani) I have only found this list about a week ago and I have
lots to learn. I am waiting for the arrival of the iRoast2 at Sweet
Maria's do I can try that roaster as the Z&D is starting to have
sporadic problems.
dave
On Oct 5, 2006, at 2:20 PM, Chuck Acridge wrote:
I bought 5 lb. of my favorite Costa Rican bean.  Bought
quantity for the savings in postage. They came in one plastic bag. 
Should I divide them up in smaller bags when I open it?  Will last me
months.  What's the best way to keep them fresh?  Store
in freezer?  Have a small vacuum container from Sharper Image- will
hold maybe a couple pounds.  
By the way, I'm roasting with stovetop popcorn popper, and with a
little experimentation, works great.  Mainly watch the color, keep the
beans moving over low heat, (combination of turning the blade and
shaking the popper.  I'm holding it over the flame (gas stove) most of
the time, not sitting on the stovetop.  Remove to colander a couple
minutes before they're the color I want.  My grinder is a $10 Procter
Silex, which to my taste does just fine.  
Chuck=
--Apple-Mail-4--749721543--

8) From: cja
My whirley blade grinder was good for years. But, I now would like to 
start figuring out what is making my cups good, gooder and goodest. I 
want to compare different roasts of the same bean, different brew 
methods of the same roast, different temps, etc, etc. With my blade 
grinder, every grind was different so I was always skeptical of my 
comparisons. I can't wait for brown to arrive with my Rocky and boatload 
of beans I have coming, YEAH! Faster, faster Tom!
Chad
On Thu, 5 Oct 2006 4:39pm, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Eddie Dove
Dave,
The last time I read one of the first three results that come uip from that
search, Tom stated not to store coffee in the plastic bags in which they
were shipped for more than a month.
Eddie
On 10/5/06, Dave Ehrenkranz  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Eddie Dove
Dave,
By the way, you can use some safety pins to close the bags.
You don't necessarily have to see a problem to have one.  Remember, you are
storing a biodegradeble food product.
Hope this helps ...
Eddie
On 10/5/06, Dave Ehrenkranz  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Michael Wascher
Yes. I've gotten excellent results from storage in the basement.
I open the SM box, mark the date on the side, and put the box on top of the
wine rack. By keeping the beans in the boxes I can tell how long I've had
them & choose accordingly.
On 10/5/06, Dave Ehrenkranz  wrote:
<Snip>
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored."
<Snip>
  - Aldous Huxley

12) From: Larry English
The cloth bags from Sweet Maria's are great - I usually order in 2-lb
increments (I like variety) and I ordered the imprinted bags ($0.35 each)
with them until I had enough for reuse.  Greens are stored in those bags
(transferred immediately from the plastic bags) in a dark cool room with
moderate humidity (doubles as a small wine cellar but not as cold - around
65-70F).  I'm currently roasting a couple of lots from August of last year
(yeah, I know, over a year old) and have several lots from earlier this year
- and all of them seem just fine.  But I do need to adjust my ordering
habits so as not to have such old lots around.  (Sure - easier said than
done.)
Larry
On 10/5/06, Michael Wascher  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Justin Marquez
On 10/5/06, Larry English  wrote:
<Snip>
I have always just kept the greens in the plastic bags.  I have some
over a year old with no noticeable problems.  Of course, that was in
West Texas where it is nomally pretty dry.
Now that we are getting back to the Houston area, my plan is to move
to the cloth bags and to try to keep the stash down to less than about
8-9 months age.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)


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