HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Leans Toward ... (27 msgs / 484 lines)
1) From: Eddie Dove
Team,
I have been contempating the RKDrum, which I realize me be a bit early for
me (only home-roasting for aboiut 3 months) considering the fact that I may
buy a completely separate grill for such.  I am curious though,  does the
roast from an RKDrum lie closer to the Gene Cafe (which I have and really
like) or the Hottop (about which I have no clue)?  Any input will be deemed
valuable since I only have experience with the Gene Cafe.  All input and
opinions are welcome!
Respectfully,
Eddie

2) From: MMore
This is an interesting strain for me as I've been considering an RK drum  
myself, but for different reasons.  I've been roasting for close to 5  years.  
began in the hot air popcorn popper, went to an Alpenroast and now  roast 
exclusively in an SC/TO (which is a great setup!).  I now want to  start selling to 
friends and family and see the RK as the way to go.   However, my big concern 
is the fact that I live in DC and we get relatively cold  winters.  What does 
this do to the profile?  Can you do an effective  roast in 30 degree (and 
maybe) colder weather?
 
I look forward to the responses from this well informed group.
 
Michael A. Roaster from Vienna
 

3) From: Les
Eddie,
In my not so humble opinion it is far superior to either one of them!  I
have been using the RK for over two years and it is amazingly flexible.  I
have posted some profiles on the RK website.  I would never to back to
a push and play machine.  I would go to the HG/DB method if I didn't have a
drum.  To answer your question however, the RK is more like the Hottop.
Les
On 10/6/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Les
Michael,
I roasted in 24 degree weather and had no problem.  My wife thought I was
nuts going out late at night when it was one of the coldest days here in
Roseburg.  I told her I had to do an experiment to see how the RK performed
in the cold.  I actually have to be more careful in the summer when it is
100 degrees and I forgot to roast in the morning and don't want to wait for
it to cool off in the evening.
Les
On 10/6/06, MMore  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Vicki Smith
I'm beginning to think that it is not much different to have multiple 
roasting tools/toys than it is to have multiple coffee making things. I 
know I will get an RK in the spring, even though where I live, it is not 
usable for about six months a year.
vicki (who has recently made arrangements to use her bread machine 
roaster in a heated industrial garage over the winter)

6) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
Darn,
I guess I have to admit I don't know what an RK roaster is. Help! Bet 
it is expensive tho'
dave
On Oct 6, 2006, at 7:27 PM, Vicki Smith wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
Just googled it and foundhttp://rkdrums.com/Will have to explore this as an option
dave
<Snip>

8) From: Eddie Dove
Les et al,
I do not want humble opinions ... I want you to tell me what your think!  In
all sincerity, I want the subjective and objective.  I wish to do
considerably larger quantities.  If you ever wanted to experess your
opinion, now is the time!!!
Seriously,
Eddie
On 10/6/06, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Eddie Dove
Dave,
Thus far, I know by reputation that this is an excellent method of
roasting.  Perhaps you shall get more information because of this thread.
Eddie
On 10/6/06, Dave Ehrenkranz  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Drum/grill combos with batches up to 5# are being used by numerous people
for home consumption AND low volume commercial. Excellent, profile
controllable roast method. And very durable. 
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee 
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm
Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Eddie Dove
Sent: Friday, October 06, 2006 7:35 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Leans Toward ...
Les et al,
I do not want humble opinions ... I want you to tell me what your think!  In
all sincerity, I want the subjective and objective.  I wish to do
considerably larger quantities.  If you ever wanted to experess your
opinion, now is the time!!! 
Seriously,
Eddie

11) From: Eddie Dove
miKe,
If you have any links, please do share them.
Eddie
On 10/6/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Les
Eddie,
I would suggest contacting Ron.  He is an honest humble guy.  I use a 99
dollar charbroil grill.  It can profile a pound and a half of coffee.  When
I go to two - 4 pounds I can only roast one profile.  So, if you are wanting
to roast 4-5 pounds you will have to spend more for a bigger grill.  Make
sure you subtract the BTUs from the side burner if it has one.  For my
purposes the 99 dollar grill is perfect.  I know a guy near me that uses a
Brinkman and has accounts.  He roasts 4 pounds all of the time and has good
profile control.  Your other area of concern will be cooling with a big
batch.  My first 4 pound roast overwhelmed my cooling capacity.  I melted
the hose on my shop vac, and ended up with about a pound in a big tray
because my colander couldn't hold more than 3 pounds.  Ron has a lot of
experience with his setup.
Les
On 10/6/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Eddie Dove
Les,
Fantastic info!  I hope people realize, that when I ask, I want whatever
they have to offer!  I will have to contact ron.  Thus far, I have
conlcluded that I wiilll have more than 1 primary roasting method ... if
that makes sen\se to anyone.
Eddie
On 10/6/06, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Brian Kamnetz
Michael,
I do not roast with an RK drum, but have followed a lot of the
discussion on this list concerning roasting in cold weather with the
RK drum. I think I correctly recall people saying that the temp makes
a difference, but as it gets colder the biggest factor is the wind.
Various people have dealt with that in different ways, including wind
deflectors. and I seem to recall something about insulation.
Brian
On 10/6/06, MMore  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: raymanowen
"I do not want humble opinions ... Seriously,
Eddie"
OK- I'm unknown in the humble or PC crowd. I have a stick of my gum for all
of those folks.
If and Only If you are as serious about coffee as the people that devote
their lives and fortunes to growing, processing, shipping, selecting, buying
and selling the commodity, Then you should consider abandoning the ersatz
toy roasters in favor of a more useful permanent roasting fixture.
Ask the man that owns one. Read their comments on the RK Drum. Then hope RLK
doesn't tire of fabricating them before you get yours!
Song Stang-
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

16) From: Wesley Simon
Eddie,
I have been using a RK drum for less than a year now.  Last Christmas, I
roasted 5 lbs in a popper to give away.  I made the shift to the drum and
haven't looked back.  I've roasted up to 3 lbs in mine.  I too, picked up a
$99 charbroil and a $6 thermometer that is way off.  I'm still learning.  I
have only messed up 2 or 3 batches.  Also, I went with an 18" stainless
steel flour sifter that sits on a 20" box fan for my cooler.  You'll also
want the Ove Glove; a glove that can handle up to 600 F I believe.  There's
nothing like the process of listening, smelling, adjusting, timing and
dumping that goes with the drum.  I enjoy it...  Wait until you dump 3 lbs
of Full City roasted Uganda Bugisu into your cooler and say to yourself
"Wow! that's a beautiful and even roast!"
Wes
On 10/6/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: Eddie Dove
Thanks for the input ... I can't wait to get into this ... I am looking for
end-of-season deals on grills now ...
18" sifter and Ove Gloves ... where does one find these items?
Eddie
On 10/9/06, Wesley Simon  wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Justin Marquez
On 10/9/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
WallyWorld!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

19) From: Justin Marquez
On 10/6/06, MMore  wrote:
<Snip>
I have and used the RK drum for almost a year.  I found that gusty
wind is far more of a problem than either a constant hot or cold
ambient temperature.  Roasting in West Texas with it's legendary winds
(those new big windmill elec gen farms are popping up all around
here!) proved to be an "interesting and challenging" experience both
for the RK and the HG/DB.
The other thing you need to be ready for is cooling a much larger
roast batch. I used a "sink strainer" from WalMart and set it on top
of a box fan.  The box fan was set up on blocks to get good air flow
from underneath. It would cool a pound roast in just about a minute.
Now that we are mostly back into the Houston area, I picked up a new
grill last weekend and when I get back into town at the completion of
the current little project at our gas plant out here in Snyder, I will
re-do the RK setup.  I am looking forward to that!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

20) From: Jim De Hoog
Eddie,
If you are adventurous and mechanically inclined, you can always build yourself a drum roaster to your own specifications.    I found the looking, designing and building was as much fun as roasting.  Restaurant supply stores and thrift stores have lots of items that one might use to build a drum roaster.
 
Jim "Ice Bucket Roaster" De Hoog
----- Original Message ----
From: Eddie Dove 
To: homeroast
Sent: Monday, October 9, 2006 4:45:40 PM
Subject: Re: +Leans Toward ...
Thanks for the input ... I can't wait to get into this ... I am looking for end-of-season deals on grills now ...
18" sifter and Ove Gloves ... where does one find these items?
Eddie
On 10/9/06, Wesley Simon  wrote: 
Eddie,
I have been using a RK drum for less than a year now.  Last Christmas, I roasted 5 lbs in a popper to give away.  I made the shift to the drum and haven't looked back.  I've roasted up to 3 lbs in mine.  I too, picked up a $99 charbroil and a $6 thermometer that is way off.  I'm still learning.  I have only messed up 2 or 3 batches.  Also, I went with an 18" stainless steel flour sifter that sits on a 20" box fan for my cooler.  You'll also want the Ove Glove; a glove that can handle up to 600 F I believe.  There's nothing like the process of listening, smelling, adjusting, timing and dumping that goes with the drum.  I enjoy it...  Wait until you dump 3 lbs of Full City roasted Uganda Bugisu into your cooler and say to yourself "Wow! that's a beautiful and even roast!" 
Wes
On 10/6/06, Eddie Dove < southcoastcoffeeroaster> wrote: 
Les,
Fantastic info!  I hope people realize, that when I ask, I want whatever they have to offer!  I will have to contact ron.  Thus far, I have conlcluded that I wiilll have more than 1 primary roasting method ... if that makes sen\se to anyone. 
Eddie
On 10/6/06, Les < les.albjerg> wrote: 
Eddie,
I would suggest contacting Ron.  He is an honest humble guy.  I use a 99 dollar charbroil grill.  It can profile a pound and a half of coffee.  When I go to two - 4 pounds I can only roast one profile.  So, if you are wanting to roast 4-5 pounds you will have to spend more for a bigger grill.  Make sure you subtract the BTUs from the side burner if it has one.  For my purposes the 99 dollar grill is perfect.  I know a guy near me that uses a Brinkman and has accounts.  He roasts 4 pounds all of the time and has good profile control.  Your other area of concern will be cooling with a big batch.  My first 4 pound roast overwhelmed my cooling capacity.  I melted the hose on my shop vac, and ended up with about a pound in a big tray because my colander couldn't hold more than 3 pounds.  Ron has a lot of experience with his setup. 
 
Les
On 10/6/06, Eddie Dove < southcoastcoffeeroaster> wrote: 
miKe,
If you have any links, please do share them. 
Eddie 
On 10/6/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote: 
Drum/grill combos with batches up to 5# are being used by numerous people for home consumption AND low volume commercial. Excellent, profile controllable roast method. And very durable. 
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee 
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm
Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before. 
From: homeroast-admin [mailto: homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Eddie Dove
Sent: Friday, October 06, 2006 7:35 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Leans Toward ...
Les et al,
I do not want humble opinions ... I want you to tell me what your think!  In all sincerity, I want the subjective and objective.  I wish to do considerably larger quantities.  If you ever wanted to experess your opinion, now is the time!!! 
Seriously,
Eddie

21) From: Eddie Dove
I am mechanically inclined and building my own is really "calling unto me"
... I may go hunting for parts and ideas this weekend.
On 10/9/06, Jim De Hoog  wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Jared Andersson
I don't own an  RK either but live and grill in Minnesota at well below zero
on a regular basis.  My relatively cheap three burner Charbroil has plenty
of power to get hot at any temp I have tried.  I agree that wind as others
have said is the thing to think about. (oh yea and ventilation so you don't
die.)  Jared
On 10/9/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: Vicki Smith
Interesting. We live in Central Alberta, and we are routinely at -20 C 
(-4 F)all winter long, with dips down to -40C (-40 F) for a couple of 
weeks each winter. How cold out has it been when you have tried it.
We have a relatively good charbroil and it uses natural gas, not 
propane. I lust for an RK. We BBQ in the winter, but not when it is -40.
I wonder just how cold out it has been when RK users have had success?
vicki
Jared Andersson wrote:
<Snip>

24) From: Ed Needham
Carbon Monoxide is not a huge concern with propane.  A bigger concern, if 
you are in an enclosed space is the pooling of leaked propane or a roaster 
fire.  I had about a 1/4 pound of beans spill into the grill once and the 
fire was a bit intense and scary, even though I knew I could keep it 
contained inside the grill.  Propane is heavier than air, and flows to the 
lowest spot in a closed space, and then ---kablooie!  or flash! or some 
other not too pleasant sounding word.
CO is a result of incomplete combustion, and propane burns rather well. 
There are indoor propane devices that have no ventilation at all, including 
rural stoves and other devices.  I get absolutely no reading at all on my 
digital readout CO detector near my roaster out in my workshop (detached 
from my house).  I still crack the door in the winter time and I installed a 
duct to take away the smoke to the outside.  I'd guess it also takes away 
whatever small CO that might be present too.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

25) From: Vince Doss
I live in Chantilly, VA - just a few miles from Vienna, VA. I bought the RK
Drum setup in April of this year. I purchased a Brinkmann 45K BTU 3 burner
grill from Walmart for 199.00 I have run about 60 pounds of beans through it
and only trashed one batch....My Esmeralda Gesha =( from trying to stretch
the roast but that is another story (we live, we learn). I have be very
happy with the RK ! My batch size has grown as my experience has grown. I
now usually roast at least 2# batches. I have done 5# a couple of times
hoping to end up with a net weight of at least 4#. cooling was/is my biggest
issue, I too killed my vacuum hose on my first 4# batch. I have a 20" round
flour seive that is best at around 3-4#
as to weather here, I routinely grill steaks in the middle of winter and the
grill gets plenty hot, but wind is always a factor regardless of
temperature. I am looking forward to roasting this winter, I dont anticipate
any problems.
Vincehttp://www.brokenflipflop.com/RKDrum/index.htmlOn 10/9/06, Wesley Simon  wrote:
<Snip>

26) From: Les
Ed,
I have had a couple of bean fires, they can put out a lot of smoke and heat!
Les
On 10/10/06, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>

27) From: Terry Stockdale
I've been using an RK Drum and a $99 Charbroil grill for a couple 
years.  love it.  Before that, I used a Home Innovations Precision 
(hot air) and then a Hottop.  LOVE THE RK!
I've got some web pages about my RK Drum experiences on my web site:http://terryscomputertips.com/rkdrumIt's time to add some more -- and I've got a couple pages of notes on 
Hottop tips that I haven't posted yet.  I'm spending too much time on 
my other web sites .
Terry
--
Terry Stockdale -- Baton Rouge, LA
My Coffee Pages:http://www.terryscomputertips.comAt 09:59 PM 10/6/2006, you wrote:">http://www.terrystockdale.com/coffeeSign up for my newsletter athttp://www.terryscomputertips.comAt 09:59 PM 10/6/2006, you wrote:
<Snip>


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