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Topic: Guatemala El inferto harvest date (3 msgs / 79 lines)
1) From: Jared Andersson
I am drinking a very nice cup of Guatemala El Injerto (city and city+
mix/one day rest) and loving it already.  I can't wait till it is properly
rested.  I am wondering if anyone has an opinion as to why this great coffee
doesn't seem to correspond with Tom's chart for when the best harvest and
shipping of Guatemala coffee usually occurs.http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee.prod.timetable.shtmlJared

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
Suppose it's because as Tom says:
"There are always exceptions, and there can always be a great coffee the
arrives out of sync with the crop cycle."  "But this is still a very general
and rough guide to the Coffee Crop Cycle and should be regarded as an
estimate, not a definite."
miKe
	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jared Andersson
	Sent: Monday, October 16, 2006 8:45 AM
	I am drinking a very nice cup of Guatemala El Injerto (city and
city+ mix/one day rest) and loving it already.  I can't wait till it is
properly rested.  I am wondering if anyone has an opinion as to why this
great coffee doesn't seem to correspond with Tom's chart for when the best
harvest and shipping of Guatemala coffee usually occurs.http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee.prod.timetable.shtml	Jared

3) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
I am drinking a very nice cup of Guatemala El Injerto (city and city+ 
mix/one day rest) and loving it already.  I can't wait till it is 
properly rested.  I am wondering if anyone has an opinion as to why 
this great coffee doesn't seem to correspond with Tom's chart for 
when the best harvest and shipping of Guatemala coffee usually 
occurs. http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee.prod.timetable.shtmlJared
combination of things: extended harvest this year, time taken to mill 
and ship out of guatemala was delayed by the auction, and actually my 
whole chart of guat should shift 1 month later, really. in general, 
the chart is an approximation, especially with mid harvest to late 
harvest coffees. i think its more accurate on the early side of 
things: a costa rica that arrives in early january is rarely good, 
was rushed through drying, etc. On the late side, you have coffee 
stored for longer periods, in parchment, at high altitude, which is 
good for the coffee quality (at least in the 30-45 day range) and 
after that (well, up to 90 days lets say), does no damage to the 
coffee provided the warehouse is in a cool, mild climate, not down at 
port. If you thin injerto is late, i still have 2 guatemala lots that 
were stored this way, coming in late oct, maybe even early nov!
but a good question, and it just points out that when you try to pin 
things down in coffee (ie, a calander of production) there are going 
to be many exceptions to any norms ...
tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com


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