HomeRoast Digest


Topic: An Observation (14 msgs / 247 lines)
1) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Roaches are a chronic problem in Hawaii. Last Christmas we got them in =
the Kitchen. We cleaned all the cabinets and exterminated. Got them out =
and are very careful. We keep the kitchen scrupulously clean and take =
the garbage out every night. we hadn't seen another roach since =
Christmas. Friday night we suddenly had them back and they were very =
active. We spent all day Saturday cleaning and spraying. Early Sunday =
morning 7:07 AM the earthquake hit. Is there any correlation or were =
they both random events?

2) From: Tom Bellhouse
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
A few more plagues and the Pharoah will have to let the people go!
Tom in GA

3) From: Brett Mason
They were always there, just hiding better....
Just my two cents from three years living in Asia...
Brett
On 10/16/06, Barry Luterman  wrote:
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-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

4) From: Alison Pfeffer
Maybe the roaches were lining up in anticipation of a taste of  
Miracle Whip.  (Which, by the way, is NOT mayonnaise!)
Alison

5) From: Lynne
ROTFL! That's a good one!
Lynne
On Oct 16, 2006, at 11:49 PM, Alison Pfeffer wrote:
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6) From: Aaron
It's possible, animals have this sense about them that they can detect 
when 'bad things' are going to happen, and can act goofy, get active 
before the actual event happens.
Chance the insects knew something was up and were just active....  They 
can crawl out of the drains too, I live in an apt and have to keep my 
drains capped off when not in use because of them filthy Q@#$% things 
doing just that.
Then again, perhaps you just caught them on an active day as was said 
before.
aaron

7) From: Barry Luterman
It was weird. We cleaned found about 10 dead ones now they are all gone and 
there were hundreds. Now none. Guess it's all clear for another earthquake.I 
know horses can predict a coming storm but roaches?

8) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It always seems to take my coffee one or 2 days longer to peak than =
anyone else's. I have always attributed it to living in Hawaii (Tropical =
weather barometric pressure etc). It dawned on me today the problem may =
be out gassing. I store my coffee in canisters that have a rubber seal =
and a metal closure. There is always enough room left in the canister so =
I don't worry about eruptions. Therefore within an hour after roasting I =
seal it and put it in the cupboard. My question-- Could it be that a =
column of CO2 forms over my beans and is trapped in the canister. This =
column of CO2 then would prevent the O2 from coming in contact with the =
beans. The result of this insulation effect of the Co would be to retard =
the aging if my beans?

9) From: Bob
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi Barry,
Wouldn't know whether sealing like that would retard aging but a simple =
and cheap test would be to pick up a coupla valve bags from Tom next =
time.
VegasBob

10) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Yes I only just realized that what maybe happening. The reason I never =
explored it was because 2 other homeroasters in Hawaii reported the same =
phenomenon.

11) From: Eddie Dove
Barry,
That certainly sounds plausible; it also sound like the beans will be under
pressure too.  Perhaps the next time you roast, you can leave some out in a
bowl on the counter and note the difference between the two (I think Ed
Needham did something similar).  It may be a combination of conditions
working in unison.
Eddie
-- 
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/14/07, Barry Luterman  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 1/14/07, Barry Luterman  wrote:
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12) From: Tom Ulmer
I have taken to leaving the lid open overnight after roasting and am pleased
with the overall freshness of my roasts.
On 1/14/07, Barry Luterman  wrote:
	It always seems to take my coffee one or 2 days longer to peak than
anyone else's. I have always attributed it to living in Hawaii (Tropical
weather barometric pressure etc). It dawned on me today the problem may be
out gassing. I store my coffee in canisters that have a rubber seal and a
metal closure. There is always enough room left in the canister so I don't
worry about eruptions. Therefore within an hour after roasting I seal it and
put it in the cupboard. My question-- Could it be that a column of CO2 forms
over my beans and is trapped in the canister. This column of CO2 then would
prevent the O2 from coming in contact with the beans. The result of this
insulation effect of the Co would be to retard the aging if my beans?

13) From: Ken Mary
Many years ago, I compared sealed to uncovered resting. When sealed shortly
after the roast, the coffee developed some unpleasant flavors. Even at the
peak rest time, in all cases, the sealed coffee was never as good as the
uncovered. I now leave the roast uncovered (no lid) for 2 days then seal.
Since I do mostly city roasts, the results may be different for full city+
or darker roasts where oil forms on the surface. I believe that sealing
immediately may reduce the oxidation of surface oils. Immediate sealing,
even vac sealing, is preferred by other list members who do a lot of
espresso.
--
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14) From: Brian Kamnetz
Darned interesting, Ken. I put a lid on loosely until the next day, then
tighten the lids. Maybe I am being a bit too hasty....
Brian
On 1/15/07, Ken Mary  wrote:
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