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Topic: Drum Roaster Mods (16 msgs / 316 lines)
1) From: Vince Doss
Has anyone successfully modified a perforated drum roaster /(RK Drum)
Rotisserrie style roaster with a blower motor? If so, I would be interested
to see your design.
I searched the archives and found (from 2001,2003,etc.) numerous threads
from Ron Kyle, Oaxaca Charlie, and Ed Needham discussing the finer points of
adding a blower motor as suggested by a certain coffee roaster Mfg owner.
While I dont want to dredge up old topics if they have been sufficiently
beaten, I too had this conversation with said mfg owner and it has peaked my
interest. Soooo anyone made this mod with any success?
Thanks,
Vince

2) From: Ed Needham
Unless you have a completely sealed system, use a fan that sucks air out 
rather than blowing in.  Otherwise you'll just blow smoke out every crack 
and hole in the roaster.
I had intended to use a fan, but just adding the flue was enough draw to 
make it work to remove smoke.
I've thought of adding one just have a bit more aggressive smoke removal 
near the end, but it has not been a top priority since things are working 
good as they are.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
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3) From: Jared Andersson
I like this question a lot Vince.  I am not sure what the purpose is of a
blower on a big boy roaster.  Is it primarily to remove chaff and smoke or
is it to control temps better?  Is the air usually preheated?  Jared
On 10/17/06, Vince Doss  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Rich Adams
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
To apply heat by convection, in addition to the heat from radiation and =
conduction.
Roasters Guild public forum has discussed this.
Respectfully,
Rich Adams

5) From: Ed Needham
There is quite a bit of convection air movement caused by the fan effect of 
the drum itself, and by the movement of the beans in the agitation process. 
If additional hot air is circulated within a fairly closed system, there may 
be an increase in heat transfer to the beans that would be tending toward 
what you would see in a fluid bed or other type of forced air roaster.  The 
roast time would be faster and the roast profile would change to get to the 
same degree of roast.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

6) From: Rich Adams

7) From: Michael McTryk
Vince
I have done what you are asking by attaching a vacuum to the outlet of
my roaster but this is a custom BBQ roaster and not an RK drum.
I find that it works well for getting rid of smoke and chaff, it also
gives me a great deal of control over the temperature ramp. By opening
the lid on the roaster I am able to control my temperature at whatever
degree I like for almost any length of time. This same level of
control is acheivable without the vacuum but much harder.
Is it necessary to the quality of the roast? No ... I don't think it
is, I routinely roast with it unattached and I have also played around
with applying vacuum at different points during the profile.
Check my link below for pictures and more explanation.
Michael
<Snip>

8) From: Ed Needham
I'm not aware of a commercial roaster that actually circulates air within 
the system.  The ones I am familiar with pull cool air in through the heat 
plenum and out the stack.  Chaff and smoke are pulled away in this process 
and the temperature can be controlled by the amount of cool air entering the 
system, rather than cycling the burner.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

9) From: Vince Doss
Michael,
Your links didnt make the trip, can you please forward them again.
Thank you,
Vince
It should be noted for anyone new to this topic/concept, that when I say
Blower, I actually mean a squirrel cage blower motor that would be pulling a
vacuum/increasing air flow in the grill and using a damper to modulate the
air flow with the intended purpose of adding convection to the methods of
heat transfer. From what I have read, there are many consequences of doing
this; chaff removal, smoke removal, heat removal, etc. I really just wanted
to see if someone has tried it and how they implimented it.
thanks for any feedback
On 10/17/06, Michael McTryk  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Michael McTryk
Lets try that again, sorry.http://members.shaw.ca/mctryk/index.htm<Snip>
McTryk
The Outback Roasterhttp://members.shaw.ca/mctryk/index.htm

11) From: Rich Adams
Sorry for the confusion Ed.   I never said "within", merely replying to the 
purpose of air flow on the big roasters.
Rich

12) From: Ed Needham
...as in a typical convection oven.  The moving air currents 'within' the 
roaster would speed the heat transfer in much the same way as a convection 
oven would speed the cooking and evenness of baking.  Not a bad idea really.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

13) From: Jared Andersson
Wow nice work Michael.  I really appreciate others work and photos.  Jared
On 10/17/06, Michael McTryk  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Vince Doss
Yes Michael Thank you for sharing, nice work!
On 10/18/06, Jared Andersson  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Leo Zick
Doesn't air blow through the drum in a drum roaster?  Or, are beans only
roasted via contact with the metal?  Seems almost trivial to me, use the
idea of a fluid bed (popper with air) and apply to a drum roaster.  I
thought that's how they worked. :/

16) From: Ed Needham
The air does flow through the drum on most commercial roasters.  Air flow is 
used in a limited way in conventional commercial roasters.  It is not 
blowing through at a high rate so as to create a convection effect on the 
roast.  The largest amount of airflow is channeled through the roaster near 
the end of the roast and to control the roaster temps for roast profiling.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************


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