HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Cupping Brazil YB (17 msgs / 388 lines)
1) From: Chad
Saturday I roasted 3 profiles of Yellow Bourbon. I can't say my cupping 
skills are any good but I will give it a shot. Gotta start somewhere. 
Tomm morning (working remote) I will do all 3 in the aeropress and see 
how much difference I can taste. Also, I will do another tasting with 
all the same profile and 3 different grinds with my Rocky. I have chosen 
the aeropress for consistency because my espresso skills are not 
consistent. Then I will do one last test with the same profile and grind 
but use FP, Aeropress, drip and Americano. Should be fun. I hope I am 
quick enough to have simultaneous hot drinks!
Chad

2) From: Blake D. Ratliff
I am very interested in your results.  I roasted some Brazil YB to a FC+ and 
brewed it 2 days later in the French Press.  I can't remember when I have 
had a cup that tasted so good.  It had a nice full body with great flavor 
with plenty of layers.  It is very special stuff.  Blake

3) From: Sheila Quinn
Speaking of the Brazil Yellow Bourbon, how do most people roast this? Do 
you like it light or dark? From Tom's notes, it should be good at many 
roast levels... HOWEVER, I roasted it dark (about full city +) last week 
and I hate it. It tastes like charcoal to me, with no flavor of the bean 
left in it. I will be roasting tonight again, but I'm going for a 
lighter roast this time - my usual City +. This seems to be my favorite 
roast for most beans.
Sheila
Chad wrote:
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4) From: Sheila Quinn
Really? Mine was bad at FC+, so I guess that means I screwed up. Oh 
well. I'm still going to try it lighter and see what happens.
Blake D. Ratliff wrote:
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5) From: miKe mcKoffee
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Have FUN and don't sell yourself short! Learning to trust your palate AND
learning to confidently describe tastes may seem hard, but "tasting" isn't.
Here's an interesting excerpt from HB Dan's commentary on the SCAA Sensory
Skill Test:
"I think that we, as a culture, are generally too insecure about our senses
of taste and smell. I talk to dozens of folks every week who say something
to me like "I just can't tell the difference between coffees" and "My palate
isn't sophisticated enough to detect the differences you describe". I always
call BS on that. I usually ask: "Can you tell the difference between Coke
and Pepsi? Do you have a preference?" The answer is usually "yes" to both. I
then reply; "The difference between those two brands of soda is much subtler
than the difference between a mediocre Kenya and a great one." To put it in
the context of our discussion: if you can taste the difference between Coke
and Pepsi (differences in sweetness and acidity) and you can tell the
difference between salted and unsalted soda crackers, you probably have the
physical ability to pass the sensory skills test. The obstacle, therefore,
is largely mental. (Ted Lingle and Joseph Rivera would probably argue with
me on this score, but I'll stick with it.)
Somehow, we've decided as a culture that perceiving and describing
differences in wine, coffee, scotch, perfume, etc. is best left to the
super-initiated and skilled. Most people, when they hear what I do for a
living, say to me: "You must have an amazingly gifted palate." While I would
love to think that this is true, I actually believe that my sense of taste
or smell is no better or worse than, say, 80% of the people out there. I
have tasted coffee with those who are considered the best in the industry,
and they are in the same boat. The only thing we do differently is 1. pay
attention, 2. trust our senses, and 3. document our results.
In thinking about this topic, it occurred to me that the sensory skills test
measures not only the ability to physically taste, but the ability to
confidently assert your results. And, in thinking about it, this is just as
important to the espresso judge as the ability to taste is.
-Peter Giuliano, Director, Counter Culture Coffee"
And:
"As Peter says, there's a real misapprehension about tasting. In general,
and there's lots of data on this, foodies, wine experts, chefs, and other
food and drink professionals are not supertasters, but rather average to
above average tasters. Supertasters are almost as unsuitable as sub-tasters
to judge food, since they are so sensitive that anything except plain water
is too sour, bitter, salty, and sweet. They're the ones keeping themselves
alive on rice cakes and bean sprouts.
The main qualification for tasting is a mature palate, that is, one that
doesn't go yuck, like a baby's palate, whenever it gets something unfamiliar
or unexpected, but tries to figure out what it is. This happens pretty
automatically as one gets beyond adolescence. Growing up in a home where
there's lots of variety and good food helps a lot; but I know many people
who discovered their liking for fine tastes later in life.
My guess, especially after meeting lots of people who post about coffee and
consider themselves poor tasters, is that everyone who's drunk a cup or shot
of good coffee and gone "wow, this is something special" is perfectly
capable of cupping and passing taste tests.
-Jim Schulman, coffeecuppers.com"
See entire article here:http://www.home-barista.com/scaa-sensory-skills-test.htmlKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.

6) From: miKe mcKoffee
Could be different interpretations of FC+ and or varying lengths of roast
time to get there. Most Brazils going too dark they'll get ashy. I haven't
roasted the BYB really dark so don't know how dark it can go. I've been
taking it just barely into 2nd, med-dark brown no oil, Rosto 12min profile.
More like FC than FC+ though I believe. (Don't roast anything really dark:-)
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
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7) From: Blake D. Ratliff
Sheila,
I will try a C+ next time and see if I like it better.  I tend to like 
coffees roasted a little darker perhaps than most.  I am still kind of new 
at this and my taste is probably not very refined.  I am roasting in a Lodge 
cast iron melting pot.  I am interest to know what you think of the C+ 
roast.  Blake

8) From: Sheila Quinn
Yep, I think the roast time was too long - and you are right, it does 
taste very ashy. A normal roast takes me about 12-13 minutes - or 14 
minutes max at the darkest I will go, but this one went 16 minutes. 
Yikes! It isn't overly dark either, but it could be that since it was 
really cold outside when I did it (HG/DB) the ambient temperature had 
more of an effect this time. I should have offset that by holding the 
heat gun closer to the beans. Oh well, not the first time I've ruined 
beans and probably not the last! Good thing I have more of them.
I just roasted another batch, at 12 1/2 minutes to City +. I'll taste it 
in 2-3 days and see what I think! I think I'll do another one to Full 
City or FC+ (correctly, I hope) tomorrow and see how it turns out.
Sheila
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
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9) From: miKe mcKoffee
FWIW Pan/Wok roasting via burner without HG augmentation (or is it
enhancement;-) often "appear" darker on the outside of the bean than total
actual overall bean roast. Do your "FC+" pot roasts look the same color
ground versus external bean? Actual degree of roast is usually judged by the
grind, not external bean color.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
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10) From: Sheila Quinn
Hi Blake,
I tend to like them lighter, for the most part. I did just roast a batch 
of this at a lighter (about City+) roast, so I'll let you know what I 
think of them in a few days. Wish I could taste them right now, but 
they'll be better later! I also just did a batch of the Ehiopian Misty 
Valley - wow! Those even smell good as they roast. Distinct smell of 
blueberries at the end. Can't wait to taste it - I love Ethiopian coffees.
I'm still new at this myself - I roast either via HG/DB (heat gun/dog 
bowl) outside on the patio or in a thick pan on the stove. I doubt my 
tastes are very refined yet either, but I can usually tell the 
difference between different origins. I'm no expert like many of the 
people on this list, so I'm just happy I'm allowed here to learn from 
everyone!
What are your favorite coffees?
Sheila
Blake D. Ratliff wrote:
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11) From: Blake D. Ratliff
miKe,
That is a good question.  When I first started roasting I got a dark out 
side with significantly lighter grinds.  Now that I have learned to 
gradually increase the heat and stir constantly the color of the grinds and 
the outside of the beans is now pretty close.  I start with a small thick 
cast iron melting pot at room temp and a propane flame.  After the pan is on 
the flame for about 30 sec I dump the coffee in the pan or pot.  Then I 
start my timer and stir.  I then take it off the flame a little after the 
1st crack is complete and keep stiring until the beens are the color I want 
then cool in a colander over a fan.  It has been taking me about 15 min to 
get to a FC with this method.  The propane flame I am using is the charcoal 
starter on my Weber performer charcoal grill.  My initial Brazil YB roast 
was a dark brown without oil but maybee a slight sheen.  Now that it has 
reasted for three days I am seeing some oil.
Blake

12) From: Blake D. Ratliff
Sheila,
I have some Ethiopian Misty Valley and I can't wait to roast it.  I got the 
SM 8 pack sampler and tried to post my roasting notes but it did not go 
through because it was too big.  My favorites were:
Brazil Carmo De Minas - Aprocam
Columbia Huila - Palestina Micro-region
Timor FTO Peaberry
Mexico Organic Oaxaca - Finca El Olivo
Papau New Guinea - Kimel Plantation
The Ehtiopian Yirgacheff has the potential to be a favorite but is was my 
first roast and I kind of scorched the outside of the beans so I hope to 
give it another chance.  Still enjoyed it none the less.  I am like you, it 
is nice to be able to learn from this group of folks.  This is a fun hobby.
Blake

13) From: Eddie Dove
Blake,
I think I saw your post on CG ... great post.
Eddie
On 10/17/06, Blake D. Ratliff  wrote:
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14) From: Sheila Quinn
Ethiopian Yirgacheffe is great coffee! The smell alone is mesmerizing, 
both while you grind it and while it's brewing. And once you taste it, 
pure heaven! That's why I'm so excited to try this Misty Valley bean. I 
should have ordered it as soon as they had it in stock!
Timor Maubesse is really good, too - and it's even better as part of a 
blend IMO. I especially like it blended with Kenyan. Delicious!
My husband loves Columbia Huila. I should probably order some for him. 
It's our anniversary on Friday - had I been thinking ahead, I could have 
ordered it in time to have it brewing for him on Friday morning. I don't 
plan ahead enough for that, though!
Sheila
Blake D. Ratliff wrote:
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15) From: Brian Kamnetz
Sheila,
I usually go to the first snaps of second, mostly because I don't use
a thermometer and don't really know where I am between first and
second. I guess taking the roast to first snaps of second means it is
FC? Anyway, how do you decide when to stop?
Brian
On 10/17/06, Sheila Quinn  wrote:
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16) From: miKe mcKoffee
When the roast smell says "man I gotta brew some of that stuff"!
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
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17) From: Cameron Forde
Are we talking about the DP Yirg?  I finally got around to roasting
some of that this past weekend.  Today it was just loaded with
blueberry.  I checked Tom's notes in the archive and there is no
mention of blueberry.  Greatly surprised by this I googled it and
found that he mentioned how loaded with blueberry this coffee is when
it was announced.  I also found it to have a strong Earl Grey
component and a mild cocao (roasted FC).
Cameron
On 10/18/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
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