HomeRoast Digest


Topic: drink proportions (19 msgs / 973 lines)
1) From: Sandy Andina
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Intelligentsia taught us at its barista class how to make both a  
"trad" capp (6 oz. free pour of slightly thicker microfoam than for a
latte) and American (Seattle-style) capp-roughly 12-oz free pour of  
thicker microfoam; as well as a latte--thinnest microfoam, free
pour w/rosetta into a large 16-20-oz latte-bowl style mug. The cappa  
free pours generally settle into foam and steamed milk--not
thick foam spooned over hot milk the way Starbucks and non-artisanal  
shops serve them.  It is even possible with practice to do a free- 
pour espresso macchiato--though a spooned dollop of foam atop a shot  
is perfectly acceptable too.
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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latte) and American (Seattle-style) =
capp-roughly 12-oz free pour of thicker microfoam; as well as a =
latte--thinnest microfoam, freepour =
w/rosetta into a large 16-20-oz latte-bowl style mug. The cappa free =
pours generally settle into foam and steamed milk--notthick foam spooned over hot milk the way Starbucks =
and non-artisanal shops serve them.  It is even possible with =
practice to do a free-pour espresso macchiato--though a spooned dollop =
of foam atop a shot is perfectly acceptable too.
  
=
--Apple-Mail-75-357023832--

2) From: Brett Mason
My espresso machine seems to make plenty of steam.....  I find that I get
very thin heated milk and some bubbles on top...  Any clues on what I could
be doing better on this?  I am seeking microfoam and thicker microfoam...
Brett
On 10/18/06, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

3) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
1 Get a steaming thermometer
2 Plunge steamer deep into milk till 100 degrees
3. Move steamer toward top of milk until the milk starts swirling. Keep =
moving to top to keep swirl going. Stop at 140 degrees
4. Option you can do it backwards. Start shallow get as much foam as you =
want. Then go deep to finish off at 140 degrees. This method sometimes =
results in foam getting all over counter.

4) From: Brett Mason
THANKS - Will do.....
Brett
On 10/18/06, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

5) From: miKe mcKoffee
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FWIW I believe and have been taught injecting air late rather than early
tends to create more "cotton" rather than smooth "microfoam". Normal
practice is to inject air into cold milk, the colder the better. Have the
pitcher 'fridge or even freezer temp too. Continuing injecting air
(stretching the milk) above 80 to 90f determines how stiff the foam will be.
Take it all the way to final milk temp for very dry stiff foam. Swirling
with tip deep while continuing heating beyond stretching incorporates the
injected air smoothly.
 
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Brett Mason
Sent: Wednesday, October 18, 2006 1:26 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +drink proportions
THANKS - Will do.....
Brett
On 10/18/06, Barry Luterman  wrote: 
1 Get a steaming thermometer
2 Plunge steamer deep into milk till 100 degrees
3. Move steamer toward top of milk until the milk starts swirling. Keep
moving to top to keep swirl going. Stop at 140 degrees
4. Option you can do it backwards. Start shallow get as much foam as you
want. Then go deep to finish off at 140 degrees. This method sometimes
results in foam getting all over counter. 

6) From: Sandy Andina
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What machine do you have? For most machines, use a 10-16-oz. pitcher  
and a steaming thermometer, bleed off some water from the steam want  
till you see steam and then close the steam valve, put the tip of the  
wand below the milk surface, reopen the valve but not all the way,  
and once you hear the steam released, immediately keep the holes of  
the wand JUST below the surface and move it around to "stretch" the  
milk (increasing its volume), until the thermometer reaches 80F. Then  
plunge the wand back deeper into the milk, tilt the pitcher away from  
you slightly, and the milk should begin to spin in a parabola  
pattern, and look like shiny white chrome. At 140F (some can take it  
up to 150), IMMEDIATELY close the steam valve knob and keep the wand  
in the milk till it is totally silent. The milk's temperature may  
rise to as much as 170-180 once you stop steaming. Then withdraw the  
wand, wipe it with a wet cloth, open the valve (not into the milk) to  
clean it and close and wipe again.
If you have a Livia, forget it. It steams too fast to use a  
thermometer, and both tips supplied let in too much air too fast. I  
installed a 2-hole tip and just go by feel and sight--be prepared to  
waste a couple of gallons of milk practicing.
On Oct 18, 2006, at 3:05 PM, Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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What machine do you have? For =
most machines, use a 10-16-oz. pitcher and a steaming thermometer, bleed =
off some water from the steam want till you see steam and then close the =
steam valve, put the tip of the wand below the milk surface, reopen the =
valve but not all the way, and once you hear the steam released, =
immediately keep the holes of the wand JUST below the surface and move =
it around to "stretch" the milk (increasing its volume), until the =
thermometer reaches 80F. Then plunge the wand back deeper into the milk, =
tilt the pitcher away from you slightly, and the milk should begin to =
spin in a parabola pattern, and look like shiny white chrome. At 140F =
(some can take it up to 150), IMMEDIATELY close the steam valve knob and =
keep the wand in the milk till it is totally silent. The milk's =
temperature may rise to as much as 170-180 once you stop steaming. Then =
withdraw the wand, wipe it with a wet cloth, open the valve (not into =
the milk) to clean it and close and wipe again.
If you have a Livia, forget = it. It steams too fast to use a thermometer, and both tips supplied let = in too much air too fast. I installed a 2-hole tip and just go by feel = and sight--be prepared to waste a couple of gallons of milk = practicing. On Oct 18, 2006, at 3:05 PM, Brett Mason = wrote:
My espresso machine seems to make plenty of = steam.....  I find that I get very thin heated milk and some bubbles = on top...  Any clues on what I could be doing better on this?  I am = seeking microfoam and thicker microfoam...   = Brett   On = 10/18/06, Sandy Andina <sandraandina> = wrote: Intelligentsia taught us at its barista class how to make both = a "trad" capp (6 oz. free pour of slightly thicker microfoam than for = a latte) and American (Seattle-style) = capp-roughly 12-oz free pour of thicker microfoam; as well as a = latte--thinnest microfoam, free pour = w/rosetta into a large 16-20-oz latte-bowl style mug. The cappa free = pours generally settle into foam and steamed milk--not thick foam spooned over hot milk the way Starbucks = and non-artisanal shops serve them.  It is even possible with = practice to do a free-pour espresso macchiato--though a spooned dollop = of foam atop a shot is perfectly acceptable too. Sandy www.sandyandina.com  
-- = Cheers, Brett http://homeroast.freeservers.com= = = --Apple-Mail-77-362219012--

7) From: McConnel
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
My experience is similar to MiKe's. 
With my Silvia, I have incorporated two-step mitigation for diminishing =
boiler steam:
Initial steam into cold, cold, 1/2 &1/2 in a hard-frozen frozen pitcher =
keeping the wand fairly shallow to "stretch" the milk for about twenty =
seconds or until just warm. Stop the steam withdraw the wand and wait =
until just before the light goes out again. Then blow out the wand =
condensation and reintroduce the wand, deep this time with renewed steam =
power to hammer those foam bubbles into smooth, creamy, microfoam. 
Good microfoam is probably not more than a 50% increase in volume above =
the original amount.

8) From: Barry Luterman
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And what's wrong with this?http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=8AZOWzZk0ZNGZr

9) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Nothing's wrong with it if that's the way you like it!  I do believe the
picture was a good example of the cotton ball effect:-)
And I'm by no means saying I'm great at micro-foaming milk.
 
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Barry Luterman
Sent: Wednesday, October 18, 2006 3:09 PM
And what's wrong with this?http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sidŠZOWzZk0ZNGZr

10) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Now I am confused. If my milk is 140 degrees and the foam is stiff like =
meringue is it still considered cotton balling?

11) From: Brett Mason
I have a UNIC Diva HX machine.  I may be getting too much steam as well - I
will follow the guidelines and see how we do...
Thanks,
Brett
On 10/18/06, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

12) From: jerry walker
what kind and size glass is that? I am a newbie so excuse the stupid questions is that a expresso shot , with foamed milk foamed in something else then poured on top of the shot?

13) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It looked pretty dry cottonish from the picture, but maybe not quite. Again
nothing wrong with that if you like it that way. And trust me, I've steamed
stiffer dryer looking in my time unintentionally learning!
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee 
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm
Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Barry Luterman
Sent: Wednesday, October 18, 2006 3:46 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +drink proportions
Now I am confused. If my milk is 140 degrees and the foam is stiff like
meringue is it still considered cotton balling?

14) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It's a hand blown 7 oz Bodum Assam double walled glass. Filled with 1/3 =
espresso,1/3 steamed milk and 1/3 foam. The milk was steamed separately =
in a foaming pitcher and then pored on top of the espresso.

15) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Oh I see what you are looking at. I spooned an extra bit of foam on the =
top for presentation purposes. What did you think of the Tiger Stripping =
on the shot?

16) From: jerry walker
beautiful glass i thought it was a bodum but wasnt sure, i am looking at some bodums and because i usually doubles in my aeropress i dont think the 20z would work i am thinking of the 30z do they make the assam in the 30z?  do you put sugar in that drink?
thanks   Jerry

17) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I think so. I put sugar in the milk and steam the milk and sugar =
together

18) From: scott miller
I have 4 of the Bodum Pavina shot glasses; 3 oz, I think. So far I
have not busted any.
In the Assam style, I have seen a 20 oz. if I'm recalling correctly,
not sure if there is a larger size in that style.
One thing folks have cautioned me about these is to be extra careful.
It's possible to crack the tumbler and larger sized glasses by just
dropping ice cubes in them. The little ones I have are espresso only &
I try to be delicate when washing... unfortunately, I have a
reputation as a ham-fisted gorilla.
cheers,
ScoTTT
On 10/19/06, jerry walker  wrote:
<Snip>

19) From: jerry walker
thanks looks delicious


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