HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Ristretto Definition ... (7 msgs / 157 lines)
1) From: Eddie Dove
Today, while at work in bustling metropolis of downtown New Orleans, a
coworker joined me in a jaunt across the street to visit an espresso stand
(extra large coffee cart ... there really isn't much open).  I wasn't
expecting an affirmative answer, but asked the young lady if she could pull
a ristretto.  I'm not sure she knew what I was asking, but the young
gentleman behind the counter jumped right it in and said "we sure can" and
began to show her!  I almost fell on the floor; no one around here yet has
ever known what I meant by ristretto.  He offered to put it in a porcelain
demitasse, I asked him what kind of coffee, etc ... he finally stated "We're
pretty passionate about our coffee."  This was all very fascinating, but
what I found most intriguing was his explanation to the young lady about
what a ristretto is ... "Its pretty much just the coffee oils ..."  Thoughts
on this definition?
Respectfully,
Eddie

2) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
i guess there are more oils in a ristretto, that sort of makes sense.
 
what baffles me is that only 'geeks' tend to ask for ristrettos.  the good
news is that if the person knows what you are talking about, youll typically
get a good shot.  most places are familiar with a 'short' shot.  the
downside - youll get a 4 second shot instead of an 8 second one.  
 
so now i wonder, why doesnt anyone refer to these tiny slurps of goodiness
as 'short shots'?  
From: Eddie Dove [mailto:southcoastcoffeeroaster] 
Sent: Wednesday, October 18, 2006 8:25 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Ristretto Definition ...
Today, while at work in bustling metropolis of downtown New Orleans, a
coworker joined me in a jaunt across the street to visit an espresso stand
(extra large coffee cart ... there really isn't much open).  I wasn't
expecting an affirmative answer, but asked the young lady if she could pull
a ristretto.  I'm not sure she knew what I was asking, but the young
gentleman behind the counter jumped right it in and said "we sure can" and
began to show her!  I almost fell on the floor; no one around here yet has
ever known what I meant by ristretto.  He offered to put it in a porcelain
demitasse, I asked him what kind of coffee, etc ... he finally stated "We're
pretty passionate about our coffee."  This was all very fascinating, but
what I found most intriguing was his explanation to the young lady about
what a ristretto is ... "Its pretty much just the coffee oils ..."  Thoughts
on this definition? 
Respectfully,
Eddie

3) From: Michael Wascher
Coffee shops in Australia used similar terminology. An espresso is a short
black, a double lungo is a long black, a short white is a capacino (usually
not as much foam as in the US, wetter milk), and a latte is called a long
white.
I'd rarely find somebody who knew what a ristreto was. No brewed coffee,
though lots of shops would have presspots but used them strictly for tea.
As for the ristretto, the guy isn't all wrong. I'd say that a ristretto is
mostly an oil/water emulsion frothed with air.
--MikeW
On 10/18/06, Leo Zick  wrote:
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-- 
"Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored."
  - Aldous Huxley

4) From: Branden Byers
Well, how did it taste?
—Branden
On 10/18/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
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5) From: Eddie Dove
It wasn't all that bad ... there were definitely flavors in there, but it
was certainly not homeroast ... Lavazza I believe.  I believe I would very
much enjoy this drink made from my home roast.
Eddie
On 10/19/06, Branden Byers  wrote:
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6) From: Branden Byers
I've been trying to coax a barista at a local coffee shop into
learning the ways of ristretto. It's the only place in town that
roasts their own beans and I just want the chance to try a ristretto
from a La Marzocco machine as opposed to my attempts on my Gaggia
Espresso. When I asked for one a month ago, she didn't know what I was
referring to. No one else in the place seems to either. But she seems
to have potential because she's been doing her own research on it but
I'm not sure if she's actually tried pulling one yet.
I've explained everything I know and that I have read and hope that
she'll pull one for me soon. Even if it doesn't taste the best, I'm
just happy to see someone intrigued by something new about coffee. I
know I am inspired to learn more almost everyday...
—Branden
On 10/19/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
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7) From: Gary Bennett
On 10/19/06, Michael Wascher <> wrote:
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Hi Michael,
The long white you refer to is usually called a 'flat white'. It's
similar to a latte, but in a cup rather than a glass (along with the
theory is that there are different amounts of foam). I haven't heard
of a short white, but most places are familiar with a cappuccino.
The standard drinks are short black, long black, flat white,
cappuccino and latte. I'd hazard a guess that the cappuccino is the
most frequently ordered coffee in Aus.
Regards, Gary
(Sydney born and bred)


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