HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Gift Beans (9 msgs / 154 lines)
1) From: Dan Kellgren
I remember this being asked a few weeks ago, but I don't remember the
results.
We're looking to roast up some beans for friends this Christmas for gifts
and am wondering what beans to buy and what roast level to take it to.
My neighbor had commented at one time that she loved my fresh roasted
coffee, but as I dug more into her opinion, she admitted that it may have
been on the "weak side if anything".  I had given her a Costa Rica coffee.
So my inclination was to go after a heavier mouth feel like a Sumatra, but
my brother feels that a Keyna AA would be better.  Anyone care to weigh in
on what I should go after for gift giving for people who are used to
prepackaged, preground, stale robusta?  I know that what ever I give them
will be many times better than what they're used to, but I'm really after
that general "crowd please-er".
Dan K

2) From: Steve Hay
I think the Sumatra would be a safer bet.  What about a Colombian?  Poopooed
by some because they are uninteresting, they usually have a pretty good
balance of body and flavor and are forgiving enough that you could roast it
to FC+ without burning it (usually).
Just my 2c.
On 10/20/06, Dan Kellgren  wrote:
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-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

3) From: Tom Ogren
I'm on the same page as Steve re: Sumatra before Kenya as Christmas gift.
Also agree that a good Colombia is always a safe bet. While perhaps
uninteresting to some of the more adventurous types on our list, I think a
well-roasted Colombian (or any SM coffee really) would be considered
interesting by most "uninitiated" folks.
TO in VA
On 10/20/06, Steve Hay  wrote:
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4) From: Tom Ogren
For real crowd-pleaser appeal, you might also consider a good Guatemalan
(like the Maria Especial) or Costa Rican (I really like the La Minita).
These both have such nice "coffee-flavor" character with subtle complexities
and good chocolatey qualities. They are not boring to me at all, but taste
"complete" in a way that perhaps only some Centrals can. Of my twenty-odd
varieties I might reach for something along these lines for gifting. I
cannot imagine anyone who likes coffee not liking either of these two. Of
course if you know the tastes or tendencies of the recipient, aim to appeal
to that. I've been enjoying a crazy (totally unrepeatable) 9-bean blend of
four Ethiopians, three Kenyas, a Yemen, and a Sumatra...It's a bit busy on
the palate of course, but once this one cools a bit the chocolate
undercurrent is stunning. If you go with a Sumatra, I recommend the Iskandar
triple-pick. If Kenya, I like the Gethumbwini the best for sheer powerhouse
complexity and wild, winey "character". I like the Geth's roasty flavors too
at a slightly darker (less fruited) roast.
TO in VA
On 10/20/06, Tom Ogren  wrote:
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5) From: Eddie Dove
Dan,
Given what most people drink, I think you want to go with something that
won't seem too different.  "Columbian" is very popular in the grocery store,
but you could show them what a Columbian coffee should truly taste like.
That should really intrigue them and perhaps get them genuinely interested.
I've noticed that most people become disintereted when it "sounds" like it
might be too exotic or too much trouble to get for themselves.
Hope this helps ...
Eddie
On 10/20/06, Dan Kellgren  wrote:
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6) From: Tim Wat
Eddie Dove wrote:
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I'm curious about another aspect of giving roasted coffee...what the 
recipient does with it after opening.
Given common home brew methods, do you find the majority of recipients 
have a grinder?  And another thing - I find most of my non-roasting 
friends don't use anything close to 7.5grams per 6-8 ounces - which 
results in an anemic cup no matter what kind of bean.  And then of 
course is the issue of water temp in their Mr. Coffee or equivalent.
I almost find myself tempted to give beans, a grinder and a french 
press.  What have the rest of you done?
Tim

7) From: Eddie Dove
Tim,
I know exactly what you mean!  I usually interrogate the subjects before
determining whether or not they warrant a sample of my precursors to
exquisite elixir.  My wife laughs at the fact that I refuse to give any to
her sister ... but I know that she has my old Mr. Coffee!
Generally, if thier equipment does not qualify, I invite them to our home
for coffee.
Eddie
On 10/20/06, Tim Wat  wrote:
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8) From: Tim Wat
Eddie Dove wrote:
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Another reason I ask is that my wife's a professional photographer 
(www.debwat.com) and we're planning on giving away coffee as a Christmas 
(or is "end of year" the politically correct term now?) gift to all her 
customers. 
I was originally thinking of giving Yirg, but didn't know if ya'll 
thought that choice would be off the radar for some folks use to a 
simple cup of joe.
Tim

9) From: Dan Kellgren
Tom - Steve - Eddie -
Great feedback guys.  Thanks.  That really helps me to decide which way to
go.
I too was thinking about grinders and brewers (FP) to go along with the
coffee.  1/2 my list have grinders (blades or cheap older hand mills) but
1/2 don't (or I'm not sure if they do).  I can't possibly see myself
grinding a whole pound of fresh roasted beans and packaging it as a gift.
Hmmmm....
Dan K
On 10/20/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
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