HomeRoast Digest


Topic: steam toy usefulness? (3 msgs / 109 lines)
1) From: John Crippen
Good morning,
I've been HG/DB roasting for 2 years.  I brew in a Clarity, a Chemex or an
Aeropress.  I love my coffee.
I wanted to find out what you were all talking about in regards to espresso,
so borrowed a steam toy (Salton) from a friend.  Is there anything useful I
can do with it or do I just need to return it and get a real machine?  So
far, my experiments with it have all been disasters.
Follow-up question:  are the less-expensive Gaggia's that our host sells
less expensive because they do less than, say, a Silvia, or because they are
made of cheaper materials?  I'm trying to decide where on the low-end to
purchase, assuming the answer to the first question.
Thanks in advance for your gentle advice,
John Crippen

2) From: Eddie Dove
John,
Return the steam toy.
The Gaggias are quality machines.  The internals on the less expensive
machines are the same as the more expensive ones.  The more expensive ones
have a 3-way solenoid to release the group pressure after making a shot and
they have metal exteriors instead of plastic.  There are other things like
whether or not the cup warmer is effective, but you need to decide for
yourself whether or not that is important to you.  My understanding is that
the Gaggias are a good place for people to start without breaking the bank,
especially if you are not sure if you will want to continue down the
espresso path.  Of course, you must have a quality grinder.
I am sure some others will chime in with more detailed information.
Hope this helps ...
Eddie
On 10/22/06, John Crippen  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
I agree the ~$200 range Gaggia's are quite capable of decent espresso. MORE
important question is what grinder will you be using? SCAA barista judge's
certification written test question: "What is the barista's most important
tool?." Correct answer is/was grinder. Interesting note in competition all
barista's use the same espresso machine setup and tuned exactly the same by
espresso machine technicians. A top high end commercial grinder is also
provided. Yet almost every competing barista brings their own grinder. It's
that important.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Eddie Dove
	Sent: Sunday, October 22, 2006 8:08 AM
	
	John,
	
	Return the steam toy.
	
	The Gaggias are quality machines.  The internals on the less
expensive machines are the same as the more expensive ones.  The more
expensive ones have a 3-way solenoid to release the group pressure after
making a shot and they have metal exteriors instead of plastic.  There are
other things like whether or not the cup warmer is effective, but you need
to decide for yourself whether or not that is important to you.  My
understanding is that the Gaggias are a good place for people to start
without breaking the bank, especially if you are not sure if you will want
to continue down the espresso path.  Of course, you must have a quality
grinder. 
	
	I am sure some others will chime in with more detailed information.
	
	Hope this helps ...
	
<Snip>
	On 10/22/06, John Crippen < john.crippen
 > wrote: 
		Good morning,
		
		I've been HG/DB roasting for 2 years.  I brew in a Clarity,
a Chemex or an Aeropress.  I love my coffee.  
		
		I wanted to find out what you were all talking about in
regards to espresso, so borrowed a steam toy (Salton) from a friend.  Is
there anything useful I can do with it or do I just need to return it and
get a real machine?  So far, my experiments with it have all been disasters.
		Follow-up question:  are the less-expensive Gaggia's that
our host sells less expensive because they do less than, say, a Silvia, or
because they are made of cheaper materials?  I'm trying to decide where on
the low-end to purchase, assuming the answer to the first question. 
		
		Thanks in advance for your gentle advice,
		
		John Crippen


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