HomeRoast Digest


Topic: You can taste the difference (6 msgs / 135 lines)
1) From: Vince Doss
So I know this is a no-brainer but I wanted to share...Background: I work on
computers/network in a school and my office is in the Library (read desk in
a storage room)I have set up an "alternative" coffee service (I took in my
Rocky and a Capresso MT500) for a few people who work close by. There is a
general coffee service for the building consisting of Bunn triple hot plate
and the standard cooking coffee pots with off the shelf ground
coffee...yuck!
I roast the coffee for, our little "alt" group, everyone buys a pound and we
keep the service going for us. I have been educating them slowly, they love
the coffee naturally, but as most of you will understand, they sometimes
balk at my expenditures, like on a grinder (the Rocky just replaced an old
cuisinart burr )for instance until they taste the difference it makes.
Anyway...I wanted to show how cleaning the pot makes a difference so I let
it go for a couple months until the inside of the pot started to show
buildup around 60 pots. I came in early and made a pot of 60g Panama 1800
meter + Carmen Estate/5g Ethiopian DP Ghimbi and decanted it in a thermal
carafe, then I cleaned the pot with Cleancaf and soaked and scrubbed  the
pot in it, now it looks brand new. I then recreated the mix for a fresh pot
and we all compared the two pots....It was great to see the expressions on
their faces and to taste the big difference between the two pots.
Vince

2) From: Brian Kamnetz
Great story, Vince.
Brian
On 10/24/06, Vince Doss  wrote:
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3) From: scott miller
I got out of my normal cleaning routine when I moved last month.
Yesterday was the first day I had cleaned anything coffee related I
currently use in 3 weeks. Although my at home use is certainly less
than what your group does at work, the difference was really obvious.
I need to get back on the regular cleaning cycle; it seems the
difference between good and bad habits regarding equipment maintenance
is that good habits are easy to break. :o)
cheers,
ScoTTT
On 10/24/06, Vince Doss  wrote:
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4) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
. . .and I'll toss in another benefit to keeping stuff clean (and tidy).
Looks good.  Sparkling glass, stainless, even black plastic, arrayed on a
table generate something so aesthetically satisfying that it cannot help but
improve the total coffee experience.
Certain roasting-related images stick in mind:  someone once wrote that he
didn't clean his roasting bowl (HG/DB) because he liked the "patina."  Good
word, but the baked-on build-up of oils, IMO, is neither tasty nor pleasant
to look at.  Other images are of dangling wires and meters and cardboard
boxes balanced (or not) on two sawhorses.  And this is among coffee
aficionados.
Coffee is held, generally, in so low esteem that the most fastidious
householders will sometimes do nothing more than "rinse out" the coffee pot.
. . .end of rant.  :o)
-- 
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary

5) From: miKe mcKoffee
While I agree a zillion percent keeping all brewing devices clean is
imperative, me thinks not for roasting chambers be it bowl or otherwise.
Check out the inside of a decades old Probat drum sometime! And the roasts
produced can be phenomenal. And FWIW I've never cleaned the SS roast chamber
on my Rosto almost 6 years roasting. Not talking about loose oiled up chaff
dust build up etc. not being bad, but the actual patina coating the metal.
Absolutely keep a roaster clean whatever it's made of, but no need to keep
the roast chamber polished looking like new. 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
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[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Heat + Beans
--all the rest is commentary
	Sent: Tuesday, October 24, 2006 10:32 AM
	
<Snip>
tidy).  Looks good.  Sparkling glass, stainless, even black plastic, arrayed
on a table generate something so aesthetically satisfying that it cannot
help but improve the total coffee experience. 
	
<Snip>
that he didn't clean his roasting bowl (HG/DB) because he liked the
"patina."  Good word, but the baked-on build-up of oils, IMO, is neither
tasty nor pleasant to look at.  Other images are of dangling wires and
meters and cardboard boxes balanced (or not) on two sawhorses.  And this is
among coffee aficionados. 
	
<Snip>
householders will sometimes do nothing more than "rinse out" the coffee pot.
<Snip>
	-- 
	Martin
	Heat + Beans 
<Snip>

6) From: Aaron
Ill be honest and say I have yet to clean out the inside of my I roast.  
Occasionally I might give it a wipe, or more like a dry rub with a dry 
paper towel but otherwise it's brown inside.  I have done simaltaneous 
batches of the same coffee with "ole smokey" and a brand spanking new I 
roast unit, and well, the difference is not really much at all that I 
can tell.
I can in no way verify this but somehow wonder if it's like 'seasoning' 
a smoker.  My smoker is probably close to 7 years old, has a nice layer 
inside it and I think that helps with the flavorings of the foods I cook 
in it.  Maybe a coffee roaster shares the same qualities to it when 
there is a buildup of past cookins in it?
Aaron


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