HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Vac Pot Fragility (29 msgs / 799 lines)
1) From: Eddie Dove
Those all glass vac pots look so enticing that I am thinking about putting
one on my Christmas wish list.  My only concern ... just how fragile are
they?  I have a little one the is almost 4 years old and I am only coherent
AFTER I have had my coffee?  Again, all input welcome.
Eddie

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Input? Don't use "show piece" all glass vac pots for first pot of the
morning and store out of reach of toddlers!: -)
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee 
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm
Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Eddie Dove
Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2006 7:09 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Vac Pot Fragility
Those all glass vac pots look so enticing that I am thinking about putting
one on my Christmas wish list.  My only concern ... just how fragile are
they?  I have a little one the is almost 4 years old and I am only coherent
AFTER I have had my coffee?  Again, all input welcome. 
Eddie

3) From: Eddie Dove
miKe,
I am not planning on getting a Royal Versailles Gold Plated Balance Vacuum
Coffee Brewer from Brussels, Belgium ... yet.  Perhaps I can get one with a
timer and ...
Eddie
On 10/26/06, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: raymanowen
You're much better off if you can say "Whoa- that looks fragile," and wipe
the butter off your fingers before you try to brew, than the alternative.
About 55 years ago, I copied mom and made coffee in the morning using the
wall grinder (32 revolutions of the crank) and a glass "Vaculator," as I
remember. Boiled water in a teapot first, then into the glass bottom with an
asbestos pad on the gas stove.
Fun to watch it go up and just imagine the invisible steam holding it up
until I turned off the gas and it came back down slowly, then faster. I
didn't like the coffee because I thought it was too hot. Kids.
How fragile is glass? Just take the glass rod and smack it against the top
funnel harder and harder until it breaks. Then you'll know. Take notes and
publish.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
On 10/26/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

5) From: Lynne
I have four kids, all pretty close in years. One thing that I learned 
pretty early in the game, was that no item is worth my desire to have 
it, if there is a potential for one of them getting injured (or more... =
which makes me think of the "Hot BBQ Coals Outside that One Son had to =
Touch, with His Cries Leading my Other Son to HAVE To Touch Them Also" =
story....This also brings to mind the 'Son Almost Losing His Front 
Teeth Because He Was Riding His Bike With His Grandfather's Karate Belt =
Wrapped Around the Handles,'  story, & the 'Both Sons Playing Scientist =
With Practically Everything in My Kitchen Cabinet - Including the 
Vinegar & Baking Soda' story.)
The ER & I became good friends, unfortunately. Both sons survived those =
years, although I am almost totally grey under my veil of L'Oreal #5.
My question (and I hate to admit this) would be: is your child a girl 
or boy, and are you planning to have any boys in the house in the 
future? The reality of my experience is that my boys got into a LOT 
more trouble than my girls, as far as potential accidents go. My memory =
(what is left of it) of the girls back then is less accidents, 
(although they had a few), but more whining.
I hate to tell you, but it doesn't stop at toddler-dom. My 'training', =
(along with me being quite a clutz), taught me to eliminate just about =
anything that could be a potential accident in our house. I am just now =
introducing a few glass items in the house, here and there (for 
instance, I actually got some small glasses - MADE OF GLASS  - not 
plastic!! Wow. I feel almost like an adult.)
My 'kids' are ages 21 to almost 26.
Lynne
On Oct 26, 2006, at 10:08 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
I 
<Snip>

6) From: Kevin
I'm going to purchase a bodum santos from SM and have two questions I was
hoping someone could help me out with.
1) what grind type is ideal for this method.  SM website says any grind
type...
2) How long does it take to brew with this method as compared to a French
press (current method)?
Thanks
-- 
Kevin

7) From: Les
Kevin,
Brew time depends on if you start with hot water in the bottom before
brewing or go cold.  I would say about 5-10 minutes longer if you start with
hot water in the bottom, much longer if you start with cold.  I use a "drip"
grind in my vac pots.  It is a bit finer than french press.
Les
On 10/27/06, Kevin  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Aaron
The time to brew depends on how much heat you put into the bodum.  The 
faster you boil the water and get it to go north, well the faster it 
will be done, and head back south.
Id say once it does start boiling and making its way up there in 
earnest, about two to three minutes then it draws back down to the 
bottom again.  Actual brew time probably about the same as a french 
press.... considering you have to heat the water for that too.
I have an electric bodum santos so kind of cheat but honestly, id say oh 
probably from cold water to hot coffee...6 minutes??
Aaron

9) From: Kevin
Aaron,
I am concerned if I can use it each morning before leaving for work or is it
a weekend/special occasion brewer?
On 10/27/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Kevin

10) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Use a separate kettle for boiling the water. then transfer the boiling =
water to the bottom half of the brewer and proceed. Takes no longer than =
any other method.

11) From: Eddie Dove
Does cleanup take longer?
On 10/27/06, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Not if you have a garbage disposal. Just dump grinds in sink and rinse. =
Should be noted though you do have to stand and watch it a while; 1 To =
make sure it doesn't run dry 2 When water travels north 2 min. brew time =
before removing it from heat source. Not like an electric that you fill =
with water and grounds and then go take your shower. Hard to multi-task =
with a vac pot.

13) From: Brett Mason
Technically, boiling water means the heating unit should dry and put
away real easy and quick - should be clean already!  (or, why do you
pour THAT into good coffee?)
Cheers,
Brett
  Always here to help!
On 10/27/06, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

14) From: Bart Frazee
On Fri, 27 Oct 2006 10:39:02 -0400, you wrote:
<Snip>
was
<Snip>
French
<Snip>
Kevin,
I've been using a Bodem for about 6 years. 
1)
I had a Miestro grinder set for drip and about 30 gr of coffee. I
gradually increased the coffee to 50 gr to get the strength I wanted.
I started getting stalls. I tried grinding courser and I tried
grinding finer. The best I could come up with was a stall about 1 out
of 3 pots. 
Many people were sugesting alternet filters to prevent stalling but
I got a rocky doserless grinder and have not had a stall since. Even
when grinding at the same setting people were using for espresso at
PNWG II. (+8) (Inow use +20)
2) 
Having read the optimum extraction is from 3 to 5 minutes, depending
on fineness of grind I aim for about 4 minutes.
I bring water to boil in a pot and pour it into the bottom pot set it
on the lowest flame I can get on my stove, then put on the top, with
the filter and grinds in it.
The water takes about 30 seconds to go up. I stur as soon as there is
enough water to wet the grinds. Extraction has started.
One minute after all the water is up, I turn the fire off.
It cools for about 1 minute and starts to come down.
The trip down takes about a minute. Extraction ends.
This give me about 3 and a half minutes.
Adjust the time before turning the fire off to your taste.
Hope you enjoy your Bodom as much as I enjoy mine!
Bart

15) From: Brian Kamnetz
I have a Bodum vac pot that I haven't used yet. I have a gas stove. I have a
metal thing that is intended to go on top of a burner (is it called a
diffuser?); is it necessary for me to use this thing when I use the Bodum
vac pot?
Thanks,
Brian

16) From: B. Scott Harroff
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I've collected, used, and sold several many vac pots.
My favorites for 'guests' are a Cona D and a gold classic Cona B.  They
don't get a lot of use, but they are wonderful from a style perspective.
My every day is a Hario Nouveau.  It's basically a state of the art from a
design perspective.  Its base can be placed on my gas stove for heating /
boiling and then it goes into the cradle over the alcohol flame.   It
basically gets 100% of the water "up", has a very nice turbulent action in
the upper chamber for constant mixing, and has a "hat" that seals in the
vapor/heat then serves as a base for the upper unit when done.
It's received tons of use/abuse (overheating) and keeps coming back from
more.  I use a Cona glass rod for "preferred" extraction.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Kevin
Sent: Friday, October 27, 2006 1:51 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Vac Pot Fragility
Aaron,
I am concerned if I can use it each morning before leaving for work or is it
a weekend/special occasion brewer?
On 10/27/06, Aaron  wrote: 
The time to brew depends on how much heat you put into the bodum.  The
faster you boil the water and get it to go north, well the faster it 
will be done, and head back south.
Id say once it does start boiling and making its way up there in
earnest, about two to three minutes then it draws back down to the
bottom again.  Actual brew time probably about the same as a french 
press.... considering you have to heat the water for that too.
I have an electric bodum santos so kind of cheat but honestly, id say oh
probably from cold water to hot coffee...6 minutes??
Aaron-- 
Kevin 

17) From: Michael Wascher
I've used mine without a diffuser with no problems. I use one of the smaller
burners. The flame hits the bottom of the pot & spreads across the bottom.
The one thing I'm careful of is temperature. That is, I don't put a pot of
cold water onto a hot stove grid.
On 10/27/06, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice; In practice,
there is."
  - Chuck Reid

18) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
The diffuser is recommended by the manufacturer and Tom. I always use =
mine in my gas stove.

19) From: Aaron
Kevin yes you can use it for daily use.  It probably will make the 
coffee faster than any drip pot you may use.
Ill try to remember.... im going fishing tomorrow and one of the 
'rictuals' is I bring a thermos full of good coffee on the boat with us 
and I use my vac pot to make it.  Ill try to remember to time it from 
throwing the power switch until it's sucked back down into the pot ready 
to go but honestly it's not even 10 minutes.....
aaron

20) From: B. Scott Harroff
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I'm one of those nuts that plays with matches.  I put my Hario right onto
the top of the burner, set to medium, and 5 minutes later have boiling
water.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Barry Luterman
Sent: Friday, October 27, 2006 6:42 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Vac Pot Fragility
The diffuser is recommended by the manufacturer and Tom. I always use mine
in my gas stove.

21) From: Aaron
Barry, that's why I love my electric Bodum so much.  I know sweet marias 
had a fairly bad writeup on them, but so far I have not had any single 
problems with mine.  I throw the water in, throw the grounds in, go 
shower or whatever, and when I come back, the coffee is done and ready 
waiting for me.
with a stovetop one now you can't do that, since it doesn't have an 
automatic heat turn off you have to be there to remove it from the heat 
source.
washing it, I just rinse the bottom pot out a few times, and the top 
part run warm water through it and give it a good rinse down the sink, 
takes a whole 45 seconds.  If you really want to give it a good 
cleaning, put some cleaner in the bottom, hook it up and let it run a 
cycle to boil the grunge out of the bottom (turn it off yourself when 
doing this, don't let it hit it's own dry out / turn off cycle)..  Id 
recommend you do NOT use dish soap or anything sudsy as you might create 
a mess when it starts churning topside.  If you got a bottle brush, you 
can shove that down into it to give it a good scrub down as well.
Aaron

22) From: Barry Luterman
Mike McKoffee has a good mod for the electric Bodum. I think the only real 
complaint he had against them was that they sprang leaks and could not be 
repaired.

23) From: Eddie Dove
What is the mod?
On 10/27/06, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>

24) From: Aaron
Barry from what I remembered, it was the smaller bodum electric pots 
that sprung the leaks.  because the bottom was so small, the heating 
element was too close to the edges and caused the pot to crack... or 
something like that.  The bigger ones now did not have that problem that 
I remember seeing hee anyways, nor have I seen with mine in frequent use.
I do *not* recall any mods though for it and would be most interested to 
hear of one.
Aaron

25) From: Eddie Dove
There is a mod that I am aware of to shorten the tube which in turn prolongs
the contact time.
On 10/27/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

26) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
He would be better to answer but I believe he added 1/4 in to each rear =
leg (he used a dowel and covered the end with felt. Thus tipping the pot =
forward a bit. The result was the brewed coffee stayed North an extra =
minute and didn't start coming South too fast.

27) From: Aaron
One thing that I have noticed about the electric vac pot, that I can't 
really fully explain is:
If I start with cold water, a good cup of 'pre prime heat' water makes 
its way north before it really gets up there and churning, and the water 
all does eventually all make it up there, but when the heater does 
finally kick off, it all comes back down pretty fast.  Im talking as 
short as 10 to 15 seconds fast.
If I leave the top half with the grounds off the bottom half until the 
water is about 170 degrees or so now, less water creeps up there, and 
when it is time to come back down, it's a lot slower, and much closer to 
the 2 to 3 minutes time we are looking for to keep it up top in the 
grounds.  The period that it's 'boiling' and a lot of aeration or 
possibly I should say, steam stirring seems to last longer too when the 
water is preheated before i push the top on.
anyone else played somewhat like this and noticed any similar results?
aaron

28) From: Cameron Forde
Hi Aaron,
I don't have any experience with these vac pots, and so I could be way
off base here.  Having said that, I wonder if it is the water
degassing that causes the early trip north (dissolved air in the water
is released as the water is heated).  This would be really easy to
test by heating water to boiling, cooling it, and then using it to
make a pot.  Sounds like too much trouble to do regularly, but your
solution of preheating the water seems like a nice work-around.
Cameron
On 10/27/06, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Here's cut & paste from May 02 post:
 
It's in the archives but here it is again. We have the $* Utopia aka Bodum
Santos 3000. You'll notice the heating plate in the bottom is at an angle.
It infuses until about inch or so is evaporated off the plate. What I did
was raise the back side about 1/4" causing evaporation to take longer and
hence infusion longer. I experimented with stacking coins and came up with
1/4" for my unit. I placed two 1/4" self stick plastic feet on the back of
the base a couple inches apart for stability. (part with clock, not lower
pot). We now always make sure the handle is over the clock so it's raising
the back (decreasing the angle of the heater plate.) As always, YMMV!
 
Note: This gave about 2min infusion once all water up North. However, a few
months ago our full sized sprang a carafe leak so tossed it, just like 3
mini's eVacs previously did. (which is I'm sure why the minis have been
discontinued, very high carafe failure rate)
 
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee 
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc: http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htm
Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Barry Luterman
Sent: Friday, October 27, 2006 5:31 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Vac Pot Fragility
He would be better to answer but I believe he added 1/4 in to each rear leg
(he used a dowel and covered the end with felt. Thus tipping the pot forward
a bit. The result was the brewed coffee stayed North an extra minute and
didn't start coming South too fast.


HomeRoast Digest