HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: Magnetic stainless steel (10 msgs / 229 lines)
1) From: Brian Kamnetz
I am wondering about a saute pan with the following description:
   - Premium 3-ply copper core
   - Magnetic stainless steel exterior
I am wondering about the "magnetic stainless steel". Is this material apt to
perform well?
Thanks,
Brian

2) From: Lynne
I am assuming you're asking this in regards to roasting green coffee 
beans. Do you already own the pan? If you do, best thing is to give it =
a try. I never heard of magnetic stainless steel - the copper core is 
good.
I found that the worst thing about using a pan was having beans fly all =
over the place. I got the heaviest pan that I could find, with a bit 
higher sides. One of the reasons I chose a heavy pan is because I roast =
on an electric stove - annoying, but it can be done. Electric stoves 
shut on and off to maintain the temp., which can mess up the roasting 
process. I get around that by putting it on the highest heat, and 
taking it off the surface, here & there, as I feel is necessary.
Lynne
On Oct 28, 2006, at 12:02 PM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
If pan for coffee roasting plain carbon steel 14 gauge wok works quite =
well,
both for heat conductivity and shape.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I =
must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal =
enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone =
before.
<Snip>

4) From: Dean
Generally Magnetic Stainless steels are in the "400 Series"--little or 
no Nickel, some with a bit of Carbon for hardenablity (knives, etc)
In addition to the induction-cooktop benefit, the main reason to use 
them is cost--nickel prices are volatile and contribute to a 20-40% 
surcharge for the alloys that contain it. Down side is they're not as 
ductile (harder to stamp) and not quite as strong.  >Generalizations<
As far as performance--maybe a little less corrosion resistance, but 
otherwise I would expect it to work as well as any other pan
my 2
Dean
Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Brian Kamnetz
Thanks, Dean, just the info I was looking for.
Brian
On 10/28/06, Dean  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-169--931505070
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Magnetic stainless steel means that there is enough iron content in  
the steel to attract a magnet. This is usually irrelevant unless you  
plan to use the pan with an induction burner or cooktop--stainless  
steel that is not magnetic will not work with it, since the burner  
will not sense there is a pan on it and will turn off. (I actually  
carry a fridge magnet with me when I shop for a stainless pan--I have  
a gas range but a separate magnetic induction "fifth burner" I like  
to use for sauteeing or searing salmon.
On Oct 28, 2006, at 11:02 AM, Brian Kamnetz wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
--Apple-Mail-169--931505070
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Magnetic stainless steel means =
that there is enough iron content in the steel to attract a magnet. This =
is usually irrelevant unless you plan to use the pan with an induction =
burner or cooktop--stainless steel that is not magnetic will not work =
with it, since the burner will not sense there is a pan on it and will =
turn off. (I actually carry a fridge magnet with me when I shop for a =
stainless pan--I have a gas range but a separate magnetic induction =
"fifth burner" I like to use for sauteeing or searing =
salmon.
On Oct 28, 2006, at 11:02 AM, Brian Kamnetz =
wrote:
I am wondering about a saute pan with the following = description: = Premium 3-ply copper core = Magnetic = stainless steel exterior = I am wondering about the "magnetic stainless steel". Is this = material apt to perform well? Thanks, = Brian = --Apple-Mail-169--931505070--

7) From: Aaron
There are many grades and 'mixtures' of stainless steel.  Yes some is a 
bit magnetic.   Monel which is a similar metal, is magnetic at some 
temperatures yet not magnetic at others.  Being magnetic stainless, is 
implying that it is not a super hi grade of stainless.
Still, it should work just fine for roasting beans.  Keep it clean and 
dry and it should last years and years.
Aaron

8) From: Lynne
Sheila -
Yeah, I love the 'green' smell, the smoke & all. True coffee nut!
Wondering - how much can you roast at one time?
Lynne
On Oct 28, 2006, at 4:57 PM, Sheila Quinn wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>

9) From: Sheila Quinn
If you buy a pan that is shaped like a wok, with very deep sides, the 
beans will not fly around. When I roast on the stove, that's what I use. =
I found a really thick stainless steel pan and it works very well. If 
you stir constantly, the roast is quite even. Only problem is the smoke, =
but that doesn't bother me. I like the smell! Occasionally, I forget to 
unhook the smoke alarm first, though - uh, oh! :)
Sheila
Lynne wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>

10) From: George Miller
In reply to: 
I am wondering about the "magnetic stainless steel". Is this material apt
to perform well? 
Thanks, 
Brian 
Twenty five years ago or so, I worked for a Tool and Die company as an 
apprentice tool maker and machinist.   A few times I worked with stainless 
steel that was magnetic, or could be picked up with a magnet.  From what I 
was told at that time,  there are different compositions of stainless and 
some have more iron ore based metals in it than others, thus those with more 
can be picked up with magnets or have some magnetic capabilities. 
Others on this list probably have more info. 
George    aka the MadHemi roaster


HomeRoast Digest