HomeRoast Digest


Topic: iRoast 2 Short Roast TImes (13 msgs / 565 lines)
1) From: John Lauck
I know there's an awful lot of talk regarding the iRoast 2 running hot etc
but after modifying my the chaff collector to fit more snuggly, I don't
think I've completely solved the problem.
I've been experimenting with the standard cupping roast Tom suggests on the
iRoast 2 tip sheet. It's a 9:30 roasting time for a City/City + roast.
However, I can't roast for longer than about 7:30 without burning the beans.
I've gotten decent results from some coffees, but I wonder if I'm getting
the best?  It seems like a 7 minute roast is cutting it too short.
I saw the other mods Tom used on the iRoast 2 and have been thinking about
changing the chaff collector to something similar.
Does anyone have any insight?

2) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Are you using pre-sets or programming it yourself?

3) From: Kevin
John,
I roasted with an iRoast 1 for about 3 months.  I had the exact same problem
with the roaster.  Kit sent some info that really helped me out.  I use his
single temp profile and have had simiar results (the iRoast does have a
'built in' roast curve that I couldn't change):
The IR has a built in profile regardless of input; 2 min to get to
~340F, 2min to get to ~385F. These are temps from a thermocouple in the
beans. The on board temps are useless as they do not correlate with the
bean temps. The next step is where you can control the rate heating. You
want to slow down the temp rise more for a lighter roast so you get an
even roast. I program only one temp; 385 for 10 min . It will take
about  7-8 minutes total to get  to City+ (435F). After that, it will
take 10 min total to get to FC, so I program 395F for FC and FC+. Then
the roast slows after first crack and I can push the cool button at the
exact temp I want and get very even roasts. It takes about 8.5 min to
get to FC+.
My voltage is 122.7 and drops to 121 with the IR running. I tried using
a variac but the fan slowed with the temperature. The single temp
profile works best for me.
Kit
I also had better with the following batch sizes:
125g for wet processed coffee
100g for dry processed coffee (found it produced more chaff)
On 11/1/06, John Lauck  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Kevin

4) From: John Lauck
Thanks Kevin, I'll have to give those roast profiles a try.  I haven't
experimented with a variac, but I've considered getting one to debug more
thoroughly.
I've been using a 150g on all my roasts lately.  My idea was to slow down
the roaster I should fill it to it's max.
Do you let it cool for the suggested (by Hearthware) 2 hours?
John
On 11/1/06, Kevin  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: John Lauck
Barry,
I'm using a programmed roast from Sweet Marias:
*Sample Roast Curves for Specific Coffees:
*Here's the roast curve that I use for almost all samples to get a City or
City plus roast (which is considered a cupping roast I know and is probably
lighter than most folks like):
Total roast time: 9:30 min
   - Stage 1: 350 F for 2:00 min
   - Stage 2: 400 F for 3:00 min
   - Stage 3: 460 F for 4:30 min
You can view it here:http://www.sweetmarias.com/hearthware.iRoasttipsheet.htmlOn 11/1/06, Barry Luterman  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Kevin
John,
I wouldn't use the max fill accoriding to the mfg.  When I did, I didn't get
the beans to circulate enough and they end up burining (absolute ash).  I
had the best results with 100 grams (dry proccessed coffee) and 125 grams
for wet processed with the following roast curves:
385 for 10 minutes for City to City+ (I've actually had to hit the cooling
cycle at 8 minutes in)
395 for 10 minutes of Full City (cooling cycle at 8min in).
I've moved on to a Gene Cafe (ordered this week) for the additional
temperature control.
Let me know if you get better results.
-- 
Kevin

7) From: Kevin
John,
Tom states on his site that the preprogrammed temps will need to be adjusted
depending on the voltage at the outlet you're using.  I think his
temperatures are good for an outlet voltage of 110v.  The voltage in my home
is 120v.  You may want to measure your voltage.  I reduced my temperatures
by 10% ((120-110)/110*100= 9% rounded to 10 to make the math simple) and had
better results as well.
350 F -->315 F
400 F -->360 F
460 F -->415 F
-- 
Kevin

8) From: Ross
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi John and Kevin,
I'm new to the list and have been roasting with the iroast2 also.  I did =
not know that the iroast had a built in limit profile 350 for 2 and 385 =
for 2.  Where did that info come from?  It's interesting that the iroast =
only lets you modify the third program on the fly.
So far I have found that no mater what program I use I end up with an =
easily heard 1st crack around 7 to 8 min and usually end up cooling at 8 =
to 9 minutes for a city to full city roast.  I tried to do a slow temp =
ramp to stretch 1st crack to after 9 minutes but could not do it with a =
1 cup roast volume.  Can someone direct me to the archives where Tom's =
modifications are discussed or perhaps forward them to me off list? 
Thanks,
Ross

9) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Try this it has always worked for me with 150 gr roasts. However, not =
all I-roasts are the same.
1. 325 for 2 min
2. 375 for 3 min
3. 435 for 4 min
Total 9 min

10) From: Sandy Andina
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Try a long heavy-duty extension cord.
On Nov 1, 2006, at 12:44 PM, John Lauck wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
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Try a long heavy-duty extension =
cord.
On Nov 1, 2006, at 12:44 PM, John Lauck =
wrote:
I know there's an awful lot of talk regarding the iRoast 2 = running hot etc but after modifying my the chaff collector to fit more = snuggly, I don't think I've completely solved the problem. I've = been experimenting with the standard cupping roast Tom suggests on the = iRoast 2 tip sheet. It's a 9:30 roasting time for a City/City + roast.  = However, I can't roast for longer than about 7:30 without burning the = beans. I've gotten decent results from some coffees, but I = wonder if I'm getting the best?  It seems like a 7 minute roast is = cutting it too short. I saw the other mods Tom used on the = iRoast 2 and have been thinking about changing the chaff collector to = something similar. Does anyone have any insight? = = --Apple-Mail-301--574543118--

11) From: Brett Mason
You could put it outside in a cold wind too (Iowa modification!)  I've
gone here before, and I always like going here, so let me assert once
again...
Why do people buy a roaster with all sorts of special capabilities,
and then have to work and mod the thing in order to get a good roast?
I understand "controlled environment" and "reproducible results" - but
if this isn't working, where's the value over my several $5 poppers?
I just feel bad for the promising item for the discriminating
consumer, then requiring lots of extra work, and not manageable or
reproducible at that.  I can understand your disappointment.
I know my results vary - but I use a skillet or a home-hade drum
roaster, and I pretty much nail what I'm going to get.  Why would you
spend all the money, in order to spend all the money again and try to
repair what isn't working well at a high price?
<<  Must be headed for Irak - I don't get it...  Should have studied more...
Brett
On 11/1/06, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

12) From: Tim Wat
Brett Mason wrote:
<Snip>
 snip
Tim

13) From: David Schooley
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This profile in my iRoast 2 would result in burnt beans. The trick to  
implementing the profiles in Tom's tip sheets is to understand the  
difference between the programmed temperatures and the actual  
temperatures for your individual machine. Here is what you need to do:
Step 1: Somewhere in the tip sheet Tom says that the programmed  
temperature tends to be about 50 degrees higher than the temperature  
readout on the iRoast. You should subtract 50 degrees from the  
recommended profiles in the tip sheet
to find the temperatures you really want.
Step 2: Program the results into the iRoast and see what happens,  
with the following caveats...
1) The iRoast will not go below 350-360 degrees for the first few  
minutes, so don't try. Leave Stage 1 at 350 F.
2) For Stage 2, subtracting 50 from 400 gives you 350, so bump Stage  
2 to 370 F or so as part of the experiment.
3) Stage 3 works out to 410 F, which is a good starting point.
Step 3: Add the beans and let 'er rip. Monitor the temperature  
readout during the roast. My iRoast takes 45 seconds to 1 minute to  
get to its initial temperature. The remaining stages usually settle  
within 15 seconds.
This modified profile would end up near 2nd crack at 9 1/2 minutes  
with my machine. I would end the roast somewhere around 8 1/2 minutes  
for a City to City+ roast.
I use 150 grams every time. Fewer beans make for a faster roast.  
Small beans, especially peaberries, roast faster than larger ones.  
For  Monsooned Malibar, I extend the initial heat-up/dry-out period  
to 6 or 7 minutes. I have a special profile I use just for peaberries.
The temperature readout will never exactly match the programmed  
temperature. The reasons have to do with the way the iRoast  
temperature control works and perhaps the temperature measurement  
itself. The readout temperatures themselves are quite repeatable. I  
use a thermocouple inserted into the bean mass to track what is  
really happening. I monitor the iRoast temperature readout during the  
roast to make sure the machine is doing what it is supposed to do.
On Nov 1, 2006, at 2:14 PM, John Lauck wrote:
<Snip>
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This profile in my iRoast 2 =
would result in burnt beans. The trick to implementing the profiles in =
Tom's tip sheets is to understand the difference between the programmed =
temperatures and the actual temperatures for your individual machine. =
Here is what you need to do:
Step 1: Somewhere in the = tip sheet Tom says that the programmed temperature tends to be about 50 = degrees higher than the temperature readout on the iRoast. You should = subtract 50 degrees from the recommended profiles in the tip = sheetto find the temperatures you really want.
Step 2: Program the results = into the iRoast and see what happens, with the following = caveats...1) The iRoast will not go below 350-360 degrees for = the first few minutes, so don't try. Leave Stage 1 at 350 = F.2) For Stage 2, subtracting 50 from 400 gives you 350, so = bump Stage 2 to 370 F or so as part of the experiment.3) = Stage 3 works out to 410 F, which is a good starting = point.
Step = 3: Add the beans and let 'er rip. Monitor the temperature readout during = the roast. My iRoast takes 45 seconds to 1 minute to get to its initial = temperature. The remaining stages usually settle within 15 = seconds. 
This modified profile would = end up near 2nd crack at 9 1/2 minutes with my machine. I would end the = roast somewhere around 8 1/2 minutes for a City to City+ = roast.
I use = 150 grams every time. Fewer beans make for a faster roast. Small beans, = especially peaberries, roast faster than larger ones. For  Monsooned = Malibar, I extend the initial heat-up/dry-out period to 6 or 7 minutes. = I have a special profile I use just for peaberries.
The temperature readout = will never exactly match the programmed temperature. The reasons have to = do with the way the iRoast temperature control works and perhaps the = temperature measurement itself. The readout temperatures themselves are = quite repeatable. I use a thermocouple inserted into the bean mass to = track what is really happening. I monitor the iRoast temperature readout = during the roast to make sure the machine is doing what it is supposed = to do.

On Nov 1, 2006, at = 2:14 PM, John Lauck wrote:
Barry, I'm using a programmed roast from Sweet = Marias:

Sample Roast Curves for Specific = Coffees: Here's the roast curve that I use for almost all = samples to get a City or City plus roast (which is considered a = cupping roast I know and is probably lighter than most folks like): =

Total roast time: 9:30 min

= Stage 1: 350 F for 2:00 minStage 2: 400 F for 3:00 = minStage 3: 460 F for 4:30 min You can view it here: = http://=www.sweetmarias.com/hearthware.iRoasttipsheet.html = On 11/1/06, Barry Luterman <lutermanb001&= gt; wrote: Are = you using pre-sets or programming it yourself?


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