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Topic: Changing gasket on an e61 (11 msgs / 285 lines)
1) From: The Scarlet Wombat
My Isomac Zaffiro is about 3 years old and I think it is time to change the 
group gasket and give the shower head a thorough cleaning.  How on earth do 
you get the gasket out?  There is no room there to slip anything beneath 
it, I am at a loss on this.  Next question, how do you detatch the shower 
head, or does it just fall off after you remove the gasket?  I have a 
replacement gasket that seems far too thick for the purpose, but is 
supposed to be exactly what I need, very strange.
Dan

2) From: Leo Zick
I don't use an awl to pop it off. Mine stays loose enough that I can use a
small screwdriver and grab hold of the ring around the shower screen and
gently pry until it loosens and falls.  In most e61 machines the shower
screen is held on by the gasket.  Another trick is to starta backflush and
take the PF off after a few seconds. This sometimes releases the gasket from
'reverse' pressure.
Btw, I hope you've been detergent backflushing!! :o
Heres some info:http://www.coffeegeek.com/forums/espresso/machines/54841

3) From: The Scarlet Wombat
Thanks Leo, I'll check the link out and yes, I use a detergent backflush 
regularly.  I may try the releasing the portafilter during a backflush, I 
cannot feature how one could slip a small screwdriver under that gasket, 
the sides of the grouphead where the bayonet part of the pf fit into are 
too tight for anything to fit in...but then, I'm not an engineer.  Seems 
like I need some kind of curved hook with a pointed end or something like 
that, but have no clue where to get such a thing.
Dan

4) From: Leo Zick
In the links I sent there are 2 types of baskets pictured. Do you have
either?  A small scfewdriver can be used to pry around the lip of the shower
screen, pretty easy really!  You can use the bottom of the pf for leverage..
Just go really slow and around the screen as much as you can. :)

5) From: The Scarlet Wombat
I can't see the pictures, Leo, being blind kind of messes that up. 
[grin]  The angle that a small screwdriver must be at seems to make prying 
anything up impossible.
Dan

6) From: Leo Zick
Oh, im sorry!  All my spelling mistakes must be torture to you then!
I wonder if I can explain. 
I agree, when holding a screwdriver, and staring at the grouphead, they
don't look like they will match up.
If you keep the screwdriver almost horizontal, and just gently 'dig' it into
the shower screen lip, it will fit into the gap where the screen meets the
basket. You don't want to put it in too hard or far, just get a little grab
on it, and, using the grouphead for leverage, gently pry down, a little
section at a time.
Eventually, it will come loose. If it isnt hot (trust me ive tried when its
hot, but I also grab my PF basket with my bare hands to dump it into the
garbage..heh), try grabbing the screen with your hands after a few prys and
pull down on it. Both the screen and the gasket will come down.
After the first time its out, I found it easier to remove each time after.
When putting it back in, put the screen into the gasket, place both in the
PF, with a PF basket in there(you need the lip from the basket to help it
seal), and put the PF into the grouphead.  Tighten it. Tighten again, really
hard. Then remove the PF. Put PF back on with blank basket, and run a water
backflush to test for any leaks.
Make sense? :)

7) From: Barry Luterman
There is always Plain Mike's method. Screw in two wood screws partially into 
the rubber. Make sure you do not go too far. Do not mar the metal under the 
gasket. Grasp the screws with pliers and pull down. Clean the channel well 
before inserting new gasket.

8) From: The Scarlet Wombat
I think that makes sense, Leo.  I'll give it a try, thanks.
Dan
At 09:27 AM 11/2/2006 -0500, you wrote:
Oh, im sorry!  All my spelling mistakes must be torture to you then!
I wonder if I can explain.
I agree, when holding a screwdriver, and staring at the grouphead, they
don't look like they will match up.
If you keep the screwdriver almost horizontal, and just gently 'dig' it into
the shower screen lip, it will fit into the gap where the screen meets the
basket. You don't want to put it in too hard or far, just get a little grab
on it, and, using the grouphead for leverage, gently pry down, a little
section at a time.
Eventually, it will come loose. If it isnt hot (trust me ive tried when its
hot, but I also grab my PF basket with my bare hands to dump it into the
garbage..heh), try grabbing the screen with your hands after a few prys and
pull down on it. Both the screen and the gasket will come down.
After the first time its out, I found it easier to remove each time after.
When putting it back in, put the screen into the gasket, place both in the
PF, with a PF basket in there(you need the lip from the basket to help it
seal), and put the PF into the grouphead.  Tighten it. Tighten again, really
hard. Then remove the PF. Put PF back on with blank basket, and run a water
backflush to test for any leaks.
Make sense? :)

9) From: Heat + Beans --all the rest is commentary
First,  I'd recommend having a spare shower screen on hand (about $7.50).
This operation is a breeze, every bit as easy and sensible as has been
described.  For nearly anybody, it seems, but me.   It is entirely possible
to wreck the shower screen, and I've done it.  After 3 years, your gasket
could be so hardened that it either crumbles out in pieces or is welded in
place.  My Iso was on 24/7, and I was much happier with changing out once a
year. (I followed a regular cafiza flush routine, but was always amazed by
the gunk built up behind the screen).
Martin
On 11/2/06, The Scarlet Wombat  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Martin
Heat + Beans
    all the rest is commentary

10) From: The Scarlet Wombat
Thanks Martin, I have a new shower screen, figured that it was entirely 
possible I would mung the present one.  I'm changing the gasket out of 
principle, it does not leak, but after 3 years, I figure it is only a 
matter of time.
Dan

11) From: Bruce Tanner
I wanted to include in this discussion the tool that I use for removing the
shower screen from my E61 machine. I have found a paint can opener to be
just what the task requires. The type of opener that I use has what looks
like a curved or bent screwdriver blade tip. It might not work better than a
scewdriver (I've not tried a scewdriver) but it really works well for me. I
also wanted to add that I regularly remove the shower screen and gasket
(monthly) when I clean the machine. I think this helps keep the screen and
gasket from getting too difficult to remove.
On 11/2/06, The Scarlet Wombat  wrote:
<Snip>


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