HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee Mills and Beer Grains (10 msgs / 214 lines)
1) From: Steve Hay
I've a Mazzer Mini and Super Jolly and I've been thinking about using the
Jolly as a grain mill for home brewing.  Anyone done this and have thoughts
on whether its a good idea or bad?  It seems that doing this might actually
help clean the burrs.  The grains are Barley and Malt for the most part.
(BTW: Just started an Oatmeal Stout at 1.055 I.G. [Partial Mash])
Anyone made wine out of coffee cherries?
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

2) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
i think you should sell me the major and buy a hand crank mill, it will work
better for grains as it wont crush them, but only break the hulls. :)http://www.o2resources.com/pics/IMGP2535.JPG 
From: Steve Hay [mailto:hay.steve] 
Sent: Saturday, November 04, 2006 11:41 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Coffee Mills and Beer Grains
I've a Mazzer Mini and Super Jolly and I've been thinking about using the
Jolly as a grain mill for home brewing.  Anyone done this and have thoughts
on whether its a good idea or bad?  It seems that doing this might actually
help clean the burrs.  The grains are Barley and Malt for the most part. 
(BTW: Just started an Oatmeal Stout at 1.055 I.G. [Partial Mash])
Anyone made wine out of coffee cherries?
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it." 

3) From: Tim TenClay
On 11/4/06, Steve Hay  wrote:
<Snip>
I'd love to give it a try, but I have absolutely NO idea where to get
a couple of pounds of fresh coffee cherries....  If someone can get
them to me, I'd give a 1-gallon batch a try and put a few half-bottles
up as a tradition....
Grace and Peace,
  `tim
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Rev. Tim TenClay, IAPC, NATA #253
Dunningville Reformed Church (www.dunningville.org)
Personal Blog:http://www.tenclay.org/blog

4) From: Aaron
Tim on the wine bottles for a tradition offering.  Be VERY careful.
Many states have @#$$%$%ed up laws regarding shipping alcohol.  I know 
florida for example is one of them.  I tried to send a few bottles of 
cyser home to my sister (basically a strong honey wine) and tried to do 
it the legal way, and was essentially told, unless you have a liquour 
transport license or are a winery/vinery you can NOT transport alcohol 
via post office, ups, fedex or ANY method.  I had all of them tell me 
this.  I asked what about these 'beer of the month' clubs and stuff and 
was told, they have special licenses to transport alcohol...  ::shrug::
Now you can try to just send it through but god help you if it gets 
inspected for whatever reason.  Im not advocating doing this of course 
but know that you can inadvertantly step into a big steaming one on this. 
FWIW I ended up sending my sister a plane ticket, flying her down to 
florida around the holidays to see my parents and brought the wine with 
me there and let her taste it that way.

5) From: Aaron
clean the jolly out. see if that helps.  Im thinking that grunge is 
getting built up around the shaft / rotating thingie in there.
Possibly the weather getting colder is making it stiff like my bones are 
becoming :(
Run all the coffee out of it and dose it several times to see if you can 
scrape out whatever might be catching up in there..
I have never had mine apart so can't tell for sure, but im sure someone 
on this list has, and can answer this.
any points to lubricate on the doser?
aaron

6) From: Aaron
crap, I just answered in the wrong topic I think in my last post, if so 
I apologise..
Umm, err,  id not use it for grinding grains.  Rice is one thing, floury 
grains are another,  the grains can get cakey... if that's a word, im 
thinking and cause hell in the burrs eventually.  Not to mention you 
would need a LOT more of wasted coffee to get them out of the burrs 
afterwords and back to a coffee mill.
Get a hand crank mill or put them in a blender for about 15 seconds to 
'crack them up'
Ideally you want the grain cracked, not floured really.  I have a whirly 
mill that is a bunch of fingers in concentric circles that basically 
pulverizes anything I put into it.  It's very loud, sounds like a router 
when it's wound up because its spinning several thousand rpms but it 
puts out a fine flour.  I have used it for brewing but use it more for 
my bread making,  especially grinding up rye for my pumpernickel 
bread.   Nothing beats a hot loaf of pumpernickel (or pumperbrickel if 
you dont let it rise enough) and fresh spinach dip.
Aaron

7) From: Sheila Quinn
Yep - and you cannot use shipping cartons from alcoholic products either.
ie. If you pack something else in a "recycled" wine box and try to send 
it, they will turn you away. Even though the package doesn't actually 
contain alcohol, it is still forbidden.
Sheila
Aaron wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: raymanowen
Hmmm-
"Nothing beats a hot loaf of pumpernickel (or pumperbrickel if
you dont let it rise enough) and fresh spinach dip."
Is the pumpernickel a low Gluten grain? You just caused me to wonder- I have
some Hard Red Winter Wheat, but I disremember if it's high or low Gluten
content.
A thick slice of warm whole wheat bread with a coupla slices of Swiss cheese
on it makes a decadent snack, especially if I get it right with the double
shot of Horse/ Sumatra Mandailing... Make it a Quad. Now, I'm drooling.
Wheat's not ground and those coffees aren't roasted.
I have plenty of time to roast and grind, but this Brazil Fazenda Ipanema is
a sleeping potion!
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
I approved this message-

9) From: Aaron
Ray the pumpernickel bread uses regular flour/grain,  rye flour/grain, 
and also has molasses in it.
Not sure of the gluten but thinking its probably a bit high.
Aaron

10) From: 4qchmow02
Steve wrote:
I've a Mazzer Mini and Super Jolly and I've been thinking about using the
Jolly as a grain mill for home brewing.  Anyone done this and have thoughts
on whether its a good idea or bad?  It seems that doing this might actually
help clean the burrs.  The grains are Barley and Malt for the most part.
=======
My coffee grinder is a Jerico grinder.  It cand grind coarsely, but it still pulverizes the grains.  We use it for grain grinding but it can make for a tannic brew (even when using a cheesecloth grain bag).  However, we've noticed that the tannins go away with age.  
The upside is that by pulverizing the grains extracts every bit of malt out of the grains.  
I suggest that you give it a try.  It will be different but certainly not bad.
My homebrew store has a service where you can use his Phil Mill to crack the grains before bringing them home.
Phil
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