HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Sweet Marias of TEA? (34 msgs / 992 lines)
1) From: Tom Maynard
Does anyone on the list know a tea seller as good as SM is for coffee?  Or do
you have a favorite source for quality tea?
My darling wife, who tolerates my consuming passion for homeroasting, is a tea
drinker.  I'd like to (occasionally) have one of the packages coming in the
mail be something for her.
Of course there are several tea stores in Chicago's Chinatown, and we've been
and bought, but that's a two-hour round trip.  Clicking is easier than driving.
Any input will be appreciated.  Thanks!
t.

2) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
Sure - Upton's and SpecialTeas. You can Google them.
I've ordered from both, and received great teas.
Dave S.
Tom Maynard wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
Try Murchie's . When we visited VanCouver BC we went there to get some tea for a friend and I was VERY impressed with their teas. 
Dave Ehrenkranz
daveehr
On Monday, November 06, 2006, at 10:31AM, "Tom Maynard"  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Justin Schwarz
I have really enjoyed teas from these people.http://www.strandtea.com/-Justin

5) From: Bill Cutts
I would urge anyone looking at home roasting to buy from Sweet Marias.
I don't have the same level of experience with Upton's to go that far, but
all of my dealings with them have been good and I've enjoyed everything I've
bought from them. So I won't say they're "as good" as SM - may or may not be
- but I'm a satisfied customer of Uptons.

6) From: Don Harris
I have zero experience with their teas but I enjoy a cup of their
coffee every now and then. As good as Sweet Maria's? No way!http://www.intelligentsiacoffee.com/store/teaDon
On 11/6/06, Tom Maynard  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: hermit
Hello -
My wife is a tea connoissuer with a very educated palate and hands
down she recommends Harney & Sons Tea.  Just Google them for web
address.
Rich
<Snip>
Or do
<Snip>
 a tea
<Snip>
the
<Snip>
 been
<Snip>
driving.
<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

8) From: Michael Guterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Dave Ehrenkranz wrote:
<Snip>
Michael
<Snip>

9) From: scott miller
I'll second the Harney recommendation. My non-coffee drinking friends who
visit are offered their Indian Nimbu... it's a Darjeeling with lemon and
caramel flavors. Top notch stuff, IMO. I buy the tin that has 20 sachets in
it for around $8. One tin usually lasts me a month or 6 weeks.
cheers,
ScoTTT
On 11/6/06, hermit  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
scott miller wrote:
<Snip>
Sachets? Do you mean tea bags?
Ewwwww!
Dave S.

11) From: David Schooley
Don Harris' Intelligentsia Tea recommendation is a good one. I bought  
a couple of boxes for my mother who likes tea but does not drink  
coffee. She was happy with the results. The brewing instructions on  
each box are customized for the particular tea, which was a plus.
On Nov 6, 2006, at 12:31 PM, Tom Maynard wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Steve Hay
On 11/6/06, Tom Maynard  wrote:
<Snip>
As good?  Hard to compare...  But In Pursuit of Tea is a good vendor--one
that will spend time with you and send some samples of some very good tea.
He particularly has some interesting Pu-Erh, if you are so inclined.
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

13) From: scott miller
On 11/6/06, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg  wrote:
<Snip>http://www.harney.com/classicsachets.html

14) From: Alison Pfeffer
I really love Murchee's teas.  They are based up in Canada but have a  
website and ship to the U.S.  Amazing selection of teas from all over  
the world.  My favorite is the Queen Victoria blend which has a light  
smokey flavor.  Hope this helps.
Alison
On Nov 6, 2006, at 8:46 PM, homeroast-request  
wrote:
Does anyone on the list know a tea seller as good as SM is for  
coffee?  Or do
you have a favorite source for quality tea?
My darling wife, who tolerates my consuming passion for homeroasting,  
is a tea
drinker.  I'd like to (occasionally) have one of the packages coming  
in the
mail be something for her.
Of course there are several tea stores in Chicago's Chinatown, and  
we've been
and bought, but that's a two-hour round trip.  Clicking is easier  
than driving.
Any input will be appreciated.  Thanks!
t.

15) From: Maryann & Dave Schellenberg
*Here is a quote from the Upton Tea site:
*
    *M*any people are shocked the first time that they try loose-leaf
    tea. /"I had no idea that tea could taste this good!"/ is often one
    of the first comments that we get from a new customer. Since
    Americans are generally familiar only with teabags and instant tea,
    the initial experience with fine tea can be astonishing.
       Most teabags that are available in your local supermarket or
    specialty food store are filled with finely ground tea leaves that
    are aptly termed "dust." Pre-packaged months in advance, teabags can
    sometimes be quite stale even before they reach the shelf. Thus, the
    inferior, stale leaves of tea in teabags infuse to create a strong,
    harsh cup that is generally tolerable only with milk and sugar. Even
    tins of seemingly high-quality loose tea are often as old and
    tasteless as teabags by the time they reach the consumer shelves.
I wouldn't want to be the one who suggests that a store or site selling 
products like this is comparable to what SweetMarias does for coffee.
Dave S.
scott miller wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: hermit
Pu-Erh is a very interesting tea, but not for the faint-hearted.  It
has the distinct taste of fish!  It will grow on you however.
Rich
<Snip>
vendor--one
<Snip>
tea.
<Snip>

17) From: Steve Hay
Fish?  Never had that..  I've had one that was like rubber tire..
Strangely, I know what you mean though..  The stuff grows on you; its
amazing.  So far the best Pu-Erh I've had was a Silver Needle Pu-Erh but
that was quite "expensive".  (In the same way a $50/lb. bag of coffee is
"expensive")..
Steve
On 11/7/06, hermit  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Steven Hay
hay.steve -AT- gmail.com
Barry Paradox: Consider k to be the greatest element of the set of natural
numbers whose description require maximum of 50 words: "(k+1) is a natural
number which requires more than 50 words to describe it."

18) From: Thbull
I've had the chance to tour their roasting works, and would highly  
recommend their teas. The care they put into their teas equals their  
care they place their coffee.
--Thbull
On Nov 6, 2006, at 1:43 PM, Don Harris wrote:
I have zero experience with their teas but I enjoy a cup of their
coffee every now and then. As good as Sweet Maria's? No way!http://www.intelligentsiacoffee.com/store/teaDon

19) From: scott miller
Sure, if what you are buying is fannings & dust... about the only way it is
sold is in tea bags (lame, bleached tea bags with staples in them, at that)
by large scale companies peddling low grade, commercial teas that are the
equivalent of buying coffee from Kraft Foods, Maxwell House, etc. -->
companies like Tetly, Lipton, or Luzianne.
Both Upton and Harney & Sons certainly don't fit into that category.
Harney's sachets are made using whole leaf tea:
  and are a completely different
animal. There's a small image of what their sachets look like on this page,
or you can download the accompanying article for a more clear picture:
Enough tea talk; it's time for a 2nd cup of the Brasil Cachoiera YB.
cheers,
ScoTTT
On 11/7/06, Maryann & Dave Schellenberg  wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: David/Paula
Try Imperial Tea Court.  Located in the San Francisco Bay Area, proprietor Roy Fong does most of the business over the Internet --he even contracts his own farms!  Very serious Chinese teas, tea pots, and beautiful accessories!  I had a severe allergy to coffee until about a year ago and I was as serious about tea as I now am about coffee.  I think that what Tom is to coffee, Roy is to tea...  paula

21) From: Hunt Slade
If you are looking for someone who puts the same amount of passion and enthusiasm into their teas as Tom does into his coffees - plus the exceptionally high quality and takes time to work with the customer whether novice or connoisseur-  then you are are descibing Linda Smith of Divinitea   www.divinitea.com . You will not be disappointed.
   
  Hunt - roasting deep in the woods of middle Georgia
---------------------------------
Cheap Talk? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.

22) From: Sharon Allsup
On 11/6/06, Tom Maynard  wrote:
<Snip>
I'm having to cut way back on caffiene, and what caffiene I *am*
allowed is being reserved for homeroast, so I've been collecting info
on places to buy loose-leaf tea from my friends.  I've not yet tried
any of these spots, except to poke around their websites:
The two most commonly recommended by my tea-nutty friends are Adagio
and Harneys:
www.adagio.com - Adagio
www.harney.com - Harney & Sons
Also mentioned regularly, but not as often as the above, are (in order
of recommendation frequency):
www.shopstashtea.com - Stash  (I just love the name!)
www.teajunky.com - TeaJunky
www.myplacefortea.com - My Place for Tea
www.specialteas.com - Special Teas
www.davidsonstea.com - Davidson's Tea
One thing I like about the Adagio site is that it has customer ratings
of the teas.  It reminds me of how Tom puts up a new coffee, and then
we start seeing commentary about it on the list a few days later as
the first-purchasers get their shipments and start drinking it.  The
samples-in-tins look to be about 1 oz in size.
www.teavana.com - Teavana's been militantly recommended by one guy,
and since they have stores in the malls here, I went and checked it
out.  It's more trendy new-age "tea experience" emphasis in the store
(gorgeous pottery and decor, pricey but pretty to look at -- and
heavily pushed by the store staff).  The teas they sold are tasty, but
the store is a bit off-putting.  The website sells the teas at the
same price as the stores, so it's a matter of shipping vs
gas+time+salestax.  This is the only place I've bought looseleaf from
so far, because it was in a mall we were visiting anyhow (and I've not
yet ordered online from elsewhere).
One thing I have noticed with teas:  the decaf process doesn't strip
as much flavor from the teas as it does from coffee.  I've bought a
couple from Teavana in both decaf and full-octane versions, and while
there is a difference in taste, it's nowhere near as drastic as with
coffee.
Still, I'll take a good homeroast coffee over tea any day.  I'm only
drinking the tea to have a decaf/non-caf hot beverage that's not
fattening hot chocolate.
Sharon
sorta near Atlanta

23) From: Eddie Dove
"Just say 'no' to tea."
                               - Nancy Reagan
On 11/6/06, Tom Maynard  wrote:
<Snip>

24) From: Roger Lebow
I know I'm weighing in somewhat tardily on this (curse of the working 
class, y'know), but I've had a good bit of familiarity with tea, and 
with far-flung merchants. Upton's is indeed fairly broad in their 
selection (and I never did find a better source for Indian teas). But 
as far as I know, there's no analog at Upton's to Tom--someone who 
travels the globe to find the teas at the source. Moreover, if you call 
Upton's for a recommendation, you may reach someone who really knows 
her stuff, or a mere phone jockey.
For that SM brand of expertise, you need to turn to Northern 
California's Silk Road Teas http://silkroadteas.com/),whose David 
Hoffman, like Tom, is always off to China to go right to the source, 
the individual tea farmer whenever possible, the tea coop when it's not 
possible. Both these guys understand the importance of supporting the 
individual grower. The stuff Hoffman brings back is always astonishing, 
a comprehensive cross-section of the best of all the tea in China. Not 
only that, but if you call them you get either David or someone else 
who's eminently hip to what they've got.
And yes, their pu-erh rocks...
Roger
On Nov 6, 2006, at 10:31 AM, Tom Maynard wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Jared Andersson
I love this question about the Tea seller equivalent to Tom and asked it
myself about a year ago.  I have looked at every recommendation and believe
most would provide a good cup of tea. http://silkroadteas.com/is the
closest to Tom by far but still falls far short.  The silk road guy actually
goes to the source and buys from individual farms but then when he sells it
I could not find mention of what year or month the crop was from and no
cupping notes.  I have to believe Tea is as variable year to year and
shipment to shipment as coffee is and at the obscene prices they are asking
for there product I think this info would follow.  Maybe I am missing
something but I am very disappointed in all the Tea vendors I have ever
found.  Tom you have really spoiled us and I am delighted to bask in your
attention to detail.  Jared
On 11/12/06, Roger Lebow  wrote:
<Snip>

26) From: Jared Andersson
Ok I did find some of the silkroadteas aged teas had a year on them.  I want
to say again that I value the suggestions for tea suppliers on the web and
believe they are the best available but I am also very disappointed by the
lack of Tomness in each site.  Jared
On 11/12/06, Jared Andersson  wrote:
<Snip>

27) From: Lynne
--Apple-Mail-7-400044123
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Note to self: Never, EVER, will I complain about even the MOST 
expensive coffee that SM carries.
No matter what, it's not $100, or $200 a pound.
Lynne
On Nov 12, 2006, at 10:57 PM, Jared Andersson wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
and 
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
bask 
<Snip>
<Snip>
Not
<Snip>
coming
<Snip>
easier 
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-7-400044123
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Note to self: Never, EVER, will I complain about even the MOST
expensive coffee that SM carries.
No matter what, it's not $100, or $200 a pound.
Lynne
On Nov 12, 2006, at 10:57 PM, Jared Andersson wrote:
I love this question about the Tea seller equivalent to Tom
and asked it myself about a year ago.  I have looked at every
recommendation and believe most would provide a good cup of tea. 
0000,0000,EEEhttp://silkroadteas.com/is the closest to Tom by far but still falls far short.  The silk road
guy actually goes to the source and buys from individual farms but
then when he sells it I could not find mention of what year or month
the crop was from and no cupping notes.  I have to believe Tea is as
variable year to year and shipment to shipment as coffee is and at the
obscene prices they are asking for there product I think this info
would follow.  Maybe I am missing something but I am very disappointed
in all the Tea vendors I have ever found.  Tom you have really spoiled
us and I am delighted to bask in your attention to detail.  Jared 
On 11/12/06, Roger Lebow
<<0000,0000,EEEEcellomojo>
wrote:
class, y'know), but I've had a good bit of familiarity with
tea, and
with far-flung merchants. Upton's is indeed fairly broad in their
selection (and I never did find a better source for Indian teas). But 
as far as I know, there's no analog at Upton's to Tom--someone who
travels the globe to find the teas at the source. Moreover, if you call
Upton's for a recommendation, you may reach someone who really knows
 her stuff, or a mere phone jockey.
For that SM brand of expertise, you need to turn to Northern
California's Silk Road Teas
(0000,0000,EEEhttp://silkroadteas.com/),whose David
Hoffman, like Tom, is always off to China to go right to the source,
the individual tea farmer whenever possible, the tea coop when it's not
possible. Both these guys understand the importance of supporting the
individual grower. The stuff Hoffman brings back is always astonishing,
a comprehensive cross-section of the best of all the tea in China. Not
only that, but if you call them you get either David or someone else
who's eminently hip to what they've got.
And yes, their pu-erh rocks... 
Roger
On Nov 6, 2006, at 10:31 AM, Tom Maynard wrote:
<Snip>
coffee?
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
coming
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
than
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
=
0000,0000,EEEhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/l=istinfo/homeroast
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
=
0000,0000,EEEhttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.ht=ml#personalsettings
<Snip>
homeroast mailing list
=
0000,0000,EEEhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/l=istinfo/homeroast 
To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
=
0000,0000,EEEhttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.ht=ml#personalsettings
=
--Apple-Mail-7-400044123--

28) From: Stephen Niezgoda
To be fair, you can get several extractions out of high quality teas. It is
very interesting and a pleasant way to spend an evening, to see how the
flavor of a fine tea shifts with subsequent extractions.  Try brewing the
same pot of coffee twice
On 11/12/06, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: Sharon Allsup
On 11/12/06, Lynne  wrote:
<Snip>
Well, to put it in perspective, you're also using about 1/5th, maybe
1/10th as much tea by weight for each brew.  I've weighed the stuff
out of curiousity, and depending upon the tea am using 2-3 grams of
tea vs ~15-22 grams of coffee for that same sized presspot and mug of
output.  So you get many, many more individual servings out of that
pound of tea.
And, you can get multiple cups out of each batch of tea -- "infusions"
or "extractions" tend to be the terms.  In my experience, however, I
usually stop at two, because after that point it's generally too weak
for me.
Even considering that, tho ... I'll take homeroasted coffee over the
best tea I've had so far, any day.
-Sharon

30) From: Roger Lebow
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Yup, Jared --
As you note, there are some years noted on Silk Roads' site. But one 
thing to consider is that tea, like coffee but even more so, is a 
perishable commodity: it's a given (at least with a good merchant) that =
any leaf tea offered originated in the most recent season--particularly =
with greens. It's generally the pu-erhs that bear dates, and that's 
because they can be aged for many years.
As to the "lack of Tomness" (a most endearing phrase), I can see that 
the Silk Roads web site consists of few pages, and certainly none of 
that compulsive completism that we know and love on the SM site. But I =
base my comments on having received newsletters from Silk Roads via the =
mail (they don't seem to be integrated online--Hoffman, in fact, 
resisted a web site for many years, wanting to get by on word-of-mouth) =
and from my telephone conversations. Trust me: these guys are fully as =
driven and comprehensively informed--and informative--on what they 
sell. In fact, I get the feeling that one reason the web site is so 
sketchy is that Hoffman has been working on a book about Chinese tea 
for several years, and probably can't be bothered with web content.
Roger
On Nov 12, 2006, at 8:04 PM, Jared Andersson wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
 
<Snip>
bask 
<Snip>
But
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
the
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
easier 
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-2-402611336
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Yup, Jared --
As you note, there are some years noted on Silk Roads' site. But one
thing to consider is that tea, like coffee but even more so, is a
perishable commodity: it's a given (at least with a good merchant)
that any leaf tea offered originated in the most recent
season--particularly with greens. It's generally the pu-erhs that bear
dates, and that's because they can be aged for many years.
As to the "lack of Tomness" (a most endearing phrase), I can see that
the Silk Roads web site consists of few pages, and certainly none of
that compulsive completism that we know and love on the SM site. But I
base my comments on having received newsletters from Silk Roads via
the mail (they don't seem to be integrated online--Hoffman, in fact,
resisted a web site for many years, wanting to get by on
word-of-mouth) and from my telephone conversations. Trust me: these
guys are fully as driven and comprehensively informed--and
informative--on what they sell. In fact, I get the feeling that one
reason the web site is so sketchy is that Hoffman has been working on
a book about Chinese tea for several years, and probably can't be
bothered with web content.
Roger
On Nov 12, 2006, at 8:04 PM, Jared Andersson wrote:
Ok I did find some of the silkroadteas aged teas had a year
on them.  I want to say again that I value the suggestions for tea
suppliers on the web and believe they are the best available but I am
also very disappointed by the lack of Tomness in each site.  Jared 
On 11/12/06, Jared Andersson
<<0000,0000,EEEEjaredandersson>
wrote:0000,0000,EEEEhttp://silkroadteas.com/is the closest to Tom by far but
still falls far short.  The silk road guy actually goes to the source
and buys from individual farms but then when he sells it I could not
find mention of what year or month the crop was from and no cupping
notes.  I have to believe Tea is as variable year to year and shipment
to shipment as coffee is and at the obscene prices they are asking for
there product I think this info would follow.  Maybe I am missing
something but I am very disappointed in all the Tea vendors I have
ever found.  Tom you have really spoiled us and I am delighted to bask
in your attention to detail.  Jared
On 11/12/06, Roger Lebow
<<0000,0000,EEEE cellomojo>
wrote:
class, y'know), but I've had a good bit of familiarity with
tea, and
with far-flung merchants. Upton's is indeed fairly broad in their
selection (and I never did find a better source for Indian teas). But 
as far as I know, there's no analog at Upton's to Tom--someone who
travels the globe to find the teas at the source. Moreover, if you call
Upton's for a recommendation, you may reach someone who really knows
 her stuff, or a mere phone jockey.
For that SM brand of expertise, you need to turn to Northern
California's Silk Road Teas (0000,0000,EEEEhttp://silkroadteas.com/),whose David
Hoffman, like Tom, is always off to China to go right to the source,
the individual tea farmer whenever possible, the tea coop when it's not
possible. Both these guys understand the importance of supporting the
individual grower. The stuff Hoffman brings back is always astonishing,
a comprehensive cross-section of the best of all the tea in China. Not
only that, but if you call them you get either David or someone else
who's eminently hip to what they've got.
And yes, their pu-erh rocks...
Roger
On Nov 6, 2006, at 10:31 AM, Tom Maynard wrote:
<Snip>
coffee?
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
coming
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
than
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
=
0000,0000,EEEhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/l=istinfo/homeroast
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
=
0000,0000,EEEhttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.ht=ml#personalsettings
<Snip>
homeroast mailing list
0000,0000,EEEEhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast
To change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
=
0000,0000,EEEhttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.ht=ml#personalsettings
=
--Apple-Mail-2-402611336--

31) From: Roger Lebow
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It's true that tea can cost a lot by the pound. But note that you use a =
tiny bit per cup, and as Stephen notes, fine teas can yield multiple 
infusions (try THAT with your next shot of Espresso Monkey!), with 
astonishingly subtle and rich results. So these spectacularly expensive =
teas still are much less costly than, say, a foray to (pardon the 
expression) Starbucks.
Roger
On Nov 12, 2006, at 8:24 PM, Stephen Niezgoda wrote:
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
Try 
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
David
<Snip>
it's
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
vacations,
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-3-402852785
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It's true that tea can cost a lot by the pound. But note that you use
a tiny bit per cup, and as Stephen notes, fine teas can yield multiple
infusions (try THAT with your next shot of Espresso Monkey!), with
astonishingly subtle and rich results. So these spectacularly
expensive teas still are much less costly than, say, a foray to
(pardon the expression) Starbucks.
Roger
On Nov 12, 2006, at 8:24 PM, Stephen Niezgoda wrote:
To be fair, you can get several extractions out of high
quality teas. It is very interesting and a pleasant way to spend an
evening, to see how the flavor of a fine tea shifts with subsequent
extractions.  Try brewing the same pot of coffee twice 
On 11/12/06, Lynne
<<0000,0000,EEEElynnebiz>
wrote:
expensive coffee that SM carries.
No matter what, it's not $100, or $200 a pound.
Lynne
On Nov 12, 2006, at 10:57 PM, Jared Andersson wrote: 
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
is the closest to Tom by far but still falls
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
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32) From: Roger Lebow
Yikes, Sharon, I just sent off a response that essentially says the 
same thing you do here... (Yours arrived as mine went out...) 
Coincidence??? I think not!
Roger
On Nov 12, 2006, at 8:47 PM, Sharon Allsup wrote:
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33) From: Lynne
Yes, I agree, much less tea is used. I have never tried a second 
infusion, but then the teas I buy are from our local Asian stores, and 
very inexpensive. I also like a good, black tea, (especially on cold 
afternoons in the winter) but haven't been able to find a decent one 
for a good, long while.
A lot does go a long way.
I'm sure my palate for tea is not at my level of coffee - I prefer to 
leave it this way - can't afford to improve it! Even at a couple of 
ounces, it would be out of my league.
L.
On Nov 12, 2006, at 11:47 PM, Sharon Allsup wrote:
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34) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
this place has the best tea ive ever tried.http://www.whittard.co.uk/ 
ive only bought it in england, but believe they sell over the internet in
the US. 
ive had their english breakfast and original.  tried both loose and in
packets. needless to say, loose is better.
these two arent your lipton type teas. they are stronger, more black tea i
guess?  but, VERY fragrent. makes the kitchen smell nice :)
 
ive also tried the jasmine and peach green teas. both amazing and i
sometimes blend the 2 for just a hint of peach in the jasmine tea..  
From: Jared Andersson [mailto:jaredandersson] 
Sent: Sunday, November 12, 2006 10:57 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Sweet Marias of TEA?
I love this question about the Tea seller equivalent to Tom and asked it
myself about a year ago.  I have looked at every recommendation and believe
most would provide a good cup of tea. http://silkroadteas.com/is the
closest to Tom by far but still falls far short.  The silk road guy actually
goes to the source and buys from individual farms but then when he sells it
I could not find mention of what year or month the crop was from and no
cupping notes.  I have to believe Tea is as variable year to year and
shipment to shipment as coffee is and at the obscene prices they are asking
for there product I think this info would follow.  Maybe I am missing
something but I am very disappointed in all the Tea vendors I have ever
found.  Tom you have really spoiled us and I am delighted to bask in your
attention to detail.  Jared 
On 11/12/06, Roger Lebow  wrote: 
I know I'm weighing in somewhat tardily on this (curse of the working
class, y'know), but I've had a good bit of familiarity with tea, and
with far-flung merchants. Upton's is indeed fairly broad in their
selection (and I never did find a better source for Indian teas). But 
as far as I know, there's no analog at Upton's to Tom--someone who
travels the globe to find the teas at the source. Moreover, if you call
Upton's for a recommendation, you may reach someone who really knows
her stuff, or a mere phone jockey.
For that SM brand of expertise, you need to turn to Northern
California's Silk Road Teas http://silkroadteas.com/),whose David
Hoffman, like Tom, is always off to China to go right to the source, 
the individual tea farmer whenever possible, the tea coop when it's not
possible. Both these guys understand the importance of supporting the
individual grower. The stuff Hoffman brings back is always astonishing, 
a comprehensive cross-section of the best of all the tea in China. Not
only that, but if you call them you get either David or someone else
who's eminently hip to what they've got.
And yes, their pu-erh rocks... 
Roger
On Nov 6, 2006, at 10:31 AM, Tom Maynard wrote:
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