HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Silvia-to PID or not to PID?>>>Neither! (24 msgs / 813 lines)
1) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Well, I want to thank everyone for their great advice. I did some searching
of the archives as well. I did come to the realization that I needed a
better grinder than the Maestro Plus if I am to take the plunge into quality
espresso. Step 1- Order a grinder: I like the specs best on the Mazzer Mini,
but it is just too damn big to fit under my cabinets! I ended up going for a
Rocky Doserless! It sure felt nice hitting that order button. I've never had
a real grinder before! (Too bad I didn't know about the Rocky before I got
my SMP,  I would have saved some dough!) Step 2- Order quality espresso
machine. I'll have to admit, I was nearly sold on the PID'd Silvia at one
point, but then some people on the list started putting ideas in my head by
bringing up HX machines... : ) So I checked them out. And I am glad that I
did! I realized that If I were to go with a Silvia now, I would merely
upgrade in a short period of time, and end up spending even more money than
if I would have bought a HX in the first place (kind of what happened with
my grinder). Also, the Silvia just simply is not as great a deal as it used
to be with all its new-found popularity. Rather, it seems the best bang for
the buck right now are the HX machines. I found that I really liked the
Quick Mills. However the Andreja was just a bit out of my price range, while
the Alexia was just a bit short on bells and whistles. So I ended up going
for an Anita! Man is she beautiful! I also ended up getting a PID installed
on it fresh out of the box. I know that it's not hard to get to proper temp
on this machine if it's been sitting for awhile, but why waste water when
you don't have to, and why settle for less temp control when you can have
all the control you want! I'm really looking forward to this experience, and
I am happy with my purchases, because I know I won't be getting upgrade
fever anytime soon (no comments from the peanut gallery- I'm serious!) I'm
really excited about this machine and the Rocky Grinder. I'm looking forward
to the challenge of making great espresso. What makes it all worth it is
that I will get to enjoy the best coffee in the world on a whole new level,
and I get to share my experiences with this awesome list. Thanks list for
all your suggestions, and thank you Sweet Marias for the best coffee beans
in the world. Cheers!

2) From: Kevin
Jeremy,
Why is the SMP not suitable for espresso grinding?  I'm curious as I have an
SMP and the grind setting is adjustable from extremely coarse to fine.
On 11/9/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Kevin

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
The agonizing decision process is over, now the agonizing wait for delivery!
Hopefully you also ordered a few essential items like 58mm tamper, backflush
blank and backflush detergent.
Kona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
<Snip>
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jeremy DeFranco
	Sent: Thursday, November 09, 2006 3:45 AM
	
<Snip>
searching of the archives as well. I did come to the realization that I
needed a better grinder than the Maestro Plus if I am to take the plunge
into quality espresso. Step 1- Order a grinder: I like the specs best on the
Mazzer Mini, but it is just too damn big to fit under my cabinets! I ended
up going for a Rocky Doserless! It sure felt nice hitting that order button.
I've never had a real grinder before! (Too bad I didn't know about the Rocky
before I got my SMP,  I would have saved some dough!) Step 2- Order quality
espresso machine. I'll have to admit, I was nearly sold on the PID'd Silvia
at one point, but then some people on the list started putting ideas in my
head by bringing up HX machines... : ) So I checked them out. And I am glad
that I did! I realized that If I were to go with a Silvia now, I would
merely upgrade in a short period of time, and end up spending even more
money than if I would have bought a HX in the first place (kind of what
happened with my grinder). Also, the Silvia just simply is not as great a
deal as it used to be with all its new-found popularity. Rather, it seems
the best bang for the buck right now are the HX machines. I found that I
really liked the Quick Mills. However the Andreja was just a bit out of my
price range, while the Alexia was just a bit short on bells and whistles. So
I ended up going for an Anita! Man is she beautiful! I also ended up getting
a PID installed on it fresh out of the box. I know that it's not hard to get
to proper temp on this machine if it's been sitting for awhile, but why
waste water when you don't have to, and why settle for less temp control
when you can have all the control you want! I'm really looking forward to
this experience, and I am happy with my purchases, because I know I won't be
getting upgrade fever anytime soon (no comments from the peanut gallery- I'm
serious!) I'm really excited about this machine and the Rocky Grinder. I'm
looking forward to the challenge of making great espresso. What makes it all
worth it is that I will get to enjoy the best coffee in the world on a whole
new level, and I get to share my experiences with this awesome list. Thanks
list for all your suggestions, and thank you Sweet Marias for the best
coffee beans in the world. Cheers! 
<Snip>

4) From: Marc
Kevin,
The main problem is that the burrs in the SMP are mounted to nylon and there
is enough flex in the nylon to affect the consistency of the grind. The
Rocky, the Mazzer and other grinders mount the burrs on machined brass which
holds the burrs more accurately and thus creates a more consistent grind.
For everything but espresso the SMP should work fine - it had for me. My
understanding  (i'm just about to take the step into espresso myself) is
that the quality of the grind is one of the most important factor in making
espresso.
-Marc
On 11/9/06, Kevin  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Kevin
Marc,
Thank you for the explanation.  That makes sense, the nylon housing will
have much more flex to it than a brass housing.  Guess I'll have to upgrade
when I cross that bridge and I will eventually.  My roasting/brewing skills
are a long way from venturing into espresso territory.
-- 
Kevin

6) From: Tom Bellhouse
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
While there are other SM owners around, let me ask about cleaning the =
lower burr of the unit.  How?  I don't see a way to remove it for =
cleaning -- there's a wierd star-shaped top on the center shaft that =
doesn't look like a nut, and I don't want to go cranking on it with =
pliers until I know what I'm doing.
Thanks,
Tom in GA

7) From: Les
Jeremy,
Nice setup.  I would order some SM Monkey blend.  It is a forgiving blend to
roast as well as for learning to pull shots.  A good Single Origin is more
of a challenge.
Les
On 11/9/06, Kevin  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Good luck It sounds as though you did well. After having owned a Silvia, =
with PID, and moving up to an E61 group head, (Brewtus) there really is =
no comparison. I advised the PID for the Silvia because I thought you =
wanted the Silvia and didn't want to spend more for a HX or dual boiler. =
The only thing you will miss out on is developing the art of espresso =
making with the Silvia. The E 61 grouphead makes it all so easy and =
almost foolproof

9) From: Barry Luterman
Another nice thing to have is an extra PF handle.

10) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Agonizing wait, indeed! 58mm tamper-check. Backflush equipment moving on it
now. Thanks, Jeremy
---Mike McKoffee wrote:
The agonizing decision process is over, now the agonizing wait for delivery!
Hopefully you also ordered a few essential items like 58mm tamper, backflush
blank and backflush detergent.

11) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Thanks. Got some Monkey Blend in the stash. Also got some SM Italian
Espresso Blend too. I'm also really looking forward to start creating some
blends of my own. Shall be interesting to experience SO espresso, but I'll
keep in mind that it is more of a challenge so I won't be dissapointed right
off the bat. Thanks for the tips, Jeremy
---Jeremy,
Nice setup.  I would order some SM Monkey blend.  It is a forgiving blend to
roast as well as for learning to pull shots.  A good Single Origin is more
of a challenge.
Les

12) From: Jeremy DeFranco
I'll add it to the list. Thanks, Jeremy
Barry Luterman wrote:
---Another nice thing to have is an extra PF handle.

13) From: Brett Mason
The crowd watches, in silence, as Jeremy creeps down the slippery slope...
You can finally boast to your wife about how much money you have saved!
Cheers,
Brett
On 11/9/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

14) From: Kevin
Forgive me for reviving a dead thread but I was thinking about this this for
a while: SMP espresso suitability issue. Wouldn't the shear stress of the
coffee beans exposed to the burr at any one point vs. the elasticity of the
steel burr have a greater effect on grind consistency than any flexibility
in the nylon housing? Also, the nylon in my SMP looks like it is probably
UHMW (Ultra High Molecular Weight) Polyethylene (relatively inexpensive
material commonly used in mfg lines and equipment) which I would assume to
be of greater rigidity (even if it's cheap nylon this should be true) than
the shear stress of roasted coffee beans (which is the key factor here). Any
flex here I assume to have a negligible effect on particle size (i.e.
elasticity threshold of housing is much greater than the shear stress of the
roasted coffee beans). The only way to truly determine this is with an
industrial particle size analyzer but that'll never happen. My hypothesis is
that the housing in the SMP would have no noticeable effect on grind
consistency vs. a grinder with a steal housing and both would be suitable
for good espresso.
Any ME's with input?
On 11/9/06, Marc  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Kevinhttp://www.funnyhub.com/videos/pages/snl-more-cowbell.html">http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/"I got a fever and the only prescription... is more cowbell!"http://www.funnyhub.com/videos/pages/snl-more-cowbell.html

15) From: Kevin
Dennis,
Exactly my point. I was trying to put the logic as to why I think both
designs are suitable and I feel the issue was over thought.
On 12/1/06, True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)  wrote:
<Snip>
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-- 
Kevinhttp://www.funnyhub.com/videos/pages/snl-more-cowbell.html">http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/"I got a fever and the only prescription... is more cowbell!"http://www.funnyhub.com/videos/pages/snl-more-cowbell.html

16) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Kevin,
     The reason that I decided to step up from the SMP was due mostly to the
fact that there are many more grind adjustments in the espresso range on the
Rocky than on the SMP. When you make espresso, the only factor you use to
change pour time is fineness of grind. The SMP really only has about 4 or 5
choices in the espresso grind range, while the Rocky has more, and the
Mazzer Mini has even more.  Think of the SMP as a very large increment
digital scale, and think of MM as approaching analog scale. SMP would be
analgous to using inches measurements to measure distance, Rocky might be
analgous to using mm to measure distance, and MM might be analgous to using
micrometers to measure distance. You can use a SMP for espresso, but you'll
be very limited as far as being able to get that perfect grind, because its
incriments are too big. SMP also does have "floating burrs", which means
when you find a grind that works for you, the next time you line the hopper
upto that dot, it actually won't be the same grind fineness that it was
before (it "floats" off calibration each time you use the machine- it is
constantly calibrating to a new setting everytime you grind). Don't ask me
why, I did know at a time, but I forgot. Someone please help me out on this.
I think it does have something to do with the material used either in the
burrs or around the burrs. All the other technicalities I'm not sure about,
but I do know for sure that the more expensive grinders put out some really
fluffy grinds. If you notice on the SMP, at real fine grinds, it tends to
clump up. This can cause uneven distribution, and packing, leading to an
unevenly extracted shot.
     Jeremy

17) From: Jeremy DeFranco
FWIW, I beleive the "floating" problem has been eliminated with the new
design of the Baratza Virtuoso. But here again, the major limitation is that
the increments of grind are too large to serve as a great espresso grinder.

18) From: Kevin
Jermey,
I can buy that...having more grind settings to chose from gives more
flexibility.
On 12/1/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Kevinhttp://www.funnyhub.com/videos/pages/snl-more-cowbell.html">http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/"I got a fever and the only prescription... is more cowbell!"http://www.funnyhub.com/videos/pages/snl-more-cowbell.html

19) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Explanation of floaton
the SMP...

20) From: Justin Marquez
On 12/1/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>
That is an excellent review.  It looks from his review that the SMP is
an excellent choice for mostly drip/press/vac brewing but still quite
useable for espresso just not the very best available for finer
grinds.
To my el-cheapo mind, it sounds pretty impressive for a $150 grinder
when he says  "That said, after fine tuning the grinder for a few
days, and going through a lot of coffee (about 3 pounds' worth), I was
able to get familiar with the machine's finest grind settings and with
an adjusted tamp, I was producing great espresso shots more often that
not. After a month's solid use, I found that this machine would serve
as a very capable substitute to my Rossi RR45 commercial grinder."
and then rates it as a "7" against the Rocky in grind quality.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

21) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-24--133571747
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I'll put my $.02 in here.  Yes, a Rocky is more suitable for  
espresso, and a Mazzer better still. Yet if you cannot spring for a  
$280 grinder (only reason I was able to get Rocky was an incredible  
discount on a gently used one from a fellow CoffeeGeek member), an  
SMP is a perfectly adequate partner for Silvia if stepping up from a  
crummy sub-$80 burr grinder like a "Kraps" or heaven forfend, a  
whirly-blade.  I used an SMP for the first couple of months I had my  
Silvia and even got some G-d shots. Not as many as with Rocky, of  
course, but as long as I got my tamp right and tweaked my grind to  
the bean and the humidity, my shots and milk-based coffee drinks were  
better than anything I got in Chicago outside of Metropolis or  
Intelligentsia.  I am firmly convinced that a Rocky or even a Mazzer  
Mini would not have made up for the shortcomings of that flimsy  
Capresso Ultima semi-superauto (the stepless LaPavoni PGB, which some  
compare favorably to the Rocky, certainly did not); and am glad that  
I opted to upgrade to a real espresso machine first.
Yes, the grinder is the most important (non-human) part of the  
equation for successful espresso. And a Mazzer + even a Saeco/*$  
Barista with plain PF will yield better results than even a La  
Marzocco with a crummy burr grinder. But a properly functioning and  
adjusted SMP does not fall into that latter category.  All other  
things being equal, if the choice is between a Rocky or better and no  
machine, or a Silvia plus a SMP, I would get the Silvia first. You  
can always, as I did, move the SMP to decaf or drip duty (or to the  
office or vacation home) when you get a prosumer grinder.
Caveat: I'm talking SM Plus (with free retrofit kit), not a plain  
Solis Maestro.  And troll the 'net for good deals on a Baratza  
Virtuoso, used Rocky with good burrs, or for a LaPavoni PGC or PGB  
(stepless--its only shortcomings are a flimsy plastic housing that  
can warp, as mine did, when placed too close to a heat source and  
static out the wazoo). You might find all of them for roughly the  
same price as a new SMP.
On Dec 1, 2006, at 8:36 AM, Kevin wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
--Apple-Mail-24--133571747
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	charsetO-8859-1
I'll put my $.02 in here.  =
Yes, a Rocky is more suitable for espresso, and a Mazzer better still. =
Yet if you cannot spring for a $280 grinder (only reason I was able to =
get Rocky was an incredible discount on a gently used one from a fellow =
CoffeeGeek member), an SMP is a perfectly adequate partner for Silvia if =
stepping up from a crummy sub-$80 burr grinder like a "Kraps" or heaven =
forfend, a whirly-blade.  I used an SMP for the first couple of months =
I had my Silvia and even got some G-d shots. Not as many as with Rocky, =
of course, but as long as I got my tamp right and tweaked my grind to =
the bean and the humidity, my shots and milk-based coffee drinks were =
better than anything I got in Chicago outside of Metropolis or =
Intelligentsia.  I am firmly convinced that a Rocky or even a Mazzer =
Mini would not have made up for the shortcomings of that flimsy Capresso =
Ultima semi-superauto (the stepless LaPavoni PGB, which some compare =
favorably to the Rocky, certainly did not); and am glad that I opted to =
upgrade to a real espresso machine first. 
Yes, the grinder is the = most important (non-human) part of the equation for successful espresso. = And a Mazzer + even a Saeco/*$ Barista with plain PF will yield better = results than even a La Marzocco with a crummy burr grinder. But a = properly functioning and adjusted SMP does not fall into that latter = category.  All other things being equal, if the choice is between a = Rocky or better and no machine, or a Silvia plus a SMP, I would get the = Silvia first. You can always, as I did, move the SMP to decaf or drip = duty (or to the office or vacation home) when you get a prosumer = grinder.
Caveat: I'm talking SM Plus = (with free retrofit kit), not a plain Solis Maestro.  And troll the = 'net for good deals on a Baratza Virtuoso, used Rocky with good burrs, = or for a LaPavoni PGC or PGB (stepless--its only shortcomings are a = flimsy plastic housing that can warp, as mine did, when placed too close = to a heat source and static out the wazoo). You might find all of them = for roughly the same price as a new SMP. On Dec 1, 2006, at = 8:36 AM, Kevin wrote:

Forgive = me for reviving a dead thread but I was thinking about this this for a = while: SMP espresso suitability issue. Wouldn't the shear stress of the = coffee beans exposed to the burr at any one point vs. the elasticity of = the steel burr have a greater effect on grind consistency than any = flexibility in the nylon housing? Also, the nylon in my SMP looks like = it is probably UHMW (Ultra High Molecular Weight) Polyethylene = (relatively inexpensive material commonly used in mfg lines and = equipment) which I would assume to be of greater rigidity (even if it's = cheap nylon this should be true) than the shear stress of roasted coffee = beans (which is the key factor here). Any flex here I assume to have a = negligible effect on particle size ( i.e. elasticity threshold of = housing is much greater than the shear stress of the roasted coffee = beans). The only way to truly determine this is with an industrial = particle size analyzer but that'll never happen. My hypothesis is that = the housing in the SMP would have no noticeable effect on grind = consistency vs. a grinder with a steal housing and both would be = suitable for good espresso.

Any ME's with input?

= On 11/9/06, Marc <marc.nh> = wrote: Kevin, The main problem is that the burrs in the SMP are = mounted to nylon and there is enough flex in the nylon to affect the = consistency of the grind. The Rocky, the Mazzer and other grinders mount = the burrs on machined brass which holds the burrs more accurately and = thus creates a more consistent grind. For everything but espresso the SMP should work = fine - it had for me. My understanding  (i'm just about to take the = step into espresso = myself) is that the quality of the grind is one of the most important = factor in making espresso.= -Marc On = 11/9/06, Kevin <hokies1999> wrote: = = Jeremy,   Why is the SMP not suitable for = espresso grinding?  I'm curious as I have an SMP and the grind setting = is adjustable from extremely coarse to fine.   = On 11/9/06, Jeremy DeFranco <jeremy.defranco = > wrote: Well, I want to thank everyone for their = great advice. I did some searching of the archives as well. I did come = to the realization that I needed a better grinder than the Maestro Plus = if I am to take the plunge into quality espresso. Step 1- Order a = grinder: I like the specs best on the Mazzer Mini, but it is just too = damn big to fit under my cabinets! I ended up going for a Rocky = Doserless! It sure felt nice hitting that order button. I've never had a = real grinder before! (Too bad I didn't know about the Rocky before I got = my SMP,  I would have saved some dough!) Step 2- Order quality = espresso machine. I'll have to admit, I was nearly sold on the PID'd = Silvia at one point, but then some people on the list started putting = ideas in my head by bringing up HX machines... : ) So I checked them = out. And I am glad that I did! I realized that If I were to go with a = Silvia now, I would merely upgrade in a short period of time, and end up = spending even more money than if I would have bought a HX in the first = place (kind of what happened with my grinder). Also, the Silvia just = simply is not as great a deal as it used to be with all its new-found = popularity. Rather, it seems the best bang for the buck right now are = the HX machines. I found that I really liked the Quick Mills. However = the Andreja was just a bit out of my price range, while the Alexia was = just a bit short on bells and whistles. So I ended up going for an = Anita! Man is she beautiful! I also ended up getting a PID installed on = it fresh out of the box. I know that it's not hard to get to proper temp = on this machine if it's been sitting for awhile, but why waste water = when you don't have to, and why settle for less temp control when you = can have all the control you want! I'm really looking forward to this = experience, and I am happy with my purchases, because I know I won't be = getting upgrade fever anytime soon (no comments from the peanut gallery- = I'm serious!) I'm really excited about this machine and the Rocky = Grinder. I'm looking forward to the challenge of making great espresso. = What makes it all worth it is that I will get to enjoy the best coffee = in the world on a whole new level, and I get to share my experiences = with this awesome list. Thanks list for all your suggestions, and thank = you Sweet Marias for the best coffee beans in the world. Cheers! =
-- = Kevin =
-- Kevin =http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/"I got a fever and = the only prescription... is more cowbell!" http:/= /www.funnyhub.com/videos/pages/snl-more-cowbell.html = Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-24--133571747--

22) From: Jeremy DeFranco
I totally agree. Although some folks may frown on you, I still think an
espresso machine w/ a SMP is way better than no espresso machine and a
Rocky. You're getting way more out of your beans with espresso machine/Rocky
combo than no espresso machine at all. It also gives you time to build up
your technique. Anyone that tells you to not to do this most likely is
saying this while they're enjoying a nice espresso (and you're not!). So,
plunge in, and you can always look forward to working towards that great
grinder (while sipping better espresso than most places around)... Cheers!
---All other things being equal, if the choice is between a Rocky or better
and no
machine, or a Silvia plus a SMP, I would get the Silvia first. You
can always, as I did, move the SMP to decaf or drip duty (or to the
office or vacation home) when you get a prosumer grinder.

23) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Good Grief this is what we in the Navy would call Nuking it to the Nth
Degree.
Dennis 
AKA 
FC1(SW) Dennis W. True 
CS/CS-5 
USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) 
FPO AE 09532-2830 
Man of many hats! 
HG/DB and Z&D roasting in the Indian Ocean 
 "On station and on point 154 and counting down..." 
"Direct support for troops on the ground is only a call away in support
of Operation Eagle!" 
Forgive me for reviving a dead thread but I was thinking about this this
for a while: SMP espresso suitability issue. Wouldn't the shear stress
of the coffee beans exposed to the burr at any one point vs. the
elasticity of the steel burr have a greater effect on grind consistency
than any flexibility in the nylon housing? Also, the nylon in my SMP
looks like it is probably UHMW (Ultra High Molecular Weight)
Polyethylene (relatively inexpensive material commonly used in mfg lines
and equipment) which I would assume to be of greater rigidity (even if
it's cheap nylon this should be true) than the shear stress of roasted
coffee beans (which is the key factor here). Any flex here I assume to
have a negligible effect on particle size ( i.e. elasticity threshold of
housing is much greater than the shear stress of the roasted coffee
beans). The only way to truly determine this is with an industrial
particle size analyzer but that'll never happen. My hypothesis is that
the housing in the SMP would have no noticeable effect on grind
consistency vs. a grinder with a steal housing and both would be
suitable for good espresso. 
Any ME's with input?
On 11/9/06, Marc  wrote: 
	Kevin,
	
	The main problem is that the burrs in the SMP are mounted to
nylon and there is enough flex in the nylon to affect the consistency of
the grind. The Rocky, the Mazzer and other grinders mount the burrs on
machined brass which holds the burrs more accurately and thus creates a
more consistent grind. For everything but espresso the SMP should work
fine - it had for me. My understanding  (i'm just about to take the step
into espresso myself) is that the quality of the grind is one of the
most important factor in making espresso. 
	
	-Marc 
	
	
	
	On 11/9/06, Kevin  wrote: 
		Jeremy,
		 
		Why is the SMP not suitable for espresso grinding?  I'm
curious as I have an SMP and the grind setting is adjustable from
extremely coarse to fine.
		
		 
		
		On 11/9/06, Jeremy DeFranco 
wrote: 
			Well, I want to thank everyone for their great
advice. I did some searching of the archives as well. I did come to the
realization that I needed a better grinder than the Maestro Plus if I am
to take the plunge into quality espresso. Step 1- Order a grinder: I
like the specs best on the Mazzer Mini, but it is just too damn big to
fit under my cabinets! I ended up going for a Rocky Doserless! It sure
felt nice hitting that order button. I've never had a real grinder
before! (Too bad I didn't know about the Rocky before I got my SMP,  I
would have saved some dough!) Step 2- Order quality espresso machine.
I'll have to admit, I was nearly sold on the PID'd Silvia at one point,
but then some people on the list started putting ideas in my head by
bringing up HX machines... : ) So I checked them out. And I am glad that
I did! I realized that If I were to go with a Silvia now, I would merely
upgrade in a short period of time, and end up spending even more money
than if I would have bought a HX in the first place (kind of what
happened with my grinder). Also, the Silvia just simply is not as great
a deal as it used to be with all its new-found popularity. Rather, it
seems the best bang for the buck right now are the HX machines. I found
that I really liked the Quick Mills. However the Andreja was just a bit
out of my price range, while the Alexia was just a bit short on bells
and whistles. So I ended up going for an Anita! Man is she beautiful! I
also ended up getting a PID installed on it fresh out of the box. I know
that it's not hard to get to proper temp on this machine if it's been
sitting for awhile, but why waste water when you don't have to, and why
settle for less temp control when you can have all the control you want!
I'm really looking forward to this experience, and I am happy with my
purchases, because I know I won't be getting upgrade fever anytime soon
(no comments from the peanut gallery- I'm serious!) I'm really excited
about this machine and the Rocky Grinder. I'm looking forward to the
challenge of making great espresso. What makes it all worth it is that I
will get to enjoy the best coffee in the world on a whole new level, and
I get to share my experiences with this awesome list. Thanks list for
all your suggestions, and thank you Sweet Marias for the best coffee
beans in the world. Cheers! 
			
		-- 
		Kevin 
-- 
Kevinhttp://www.funnyhub.com/videos/pages/snl-more-cowbell.html">http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/"I got a fever and the only prescription... is more cowbell!"http://www.funnyhub.com/videos/pages/snl-more-cowbell.html

24) From: James
I have owned and used the SMP for years. Originally purchased for drip/pres=
s, but then I got this great pump espresso machine on eBay and I have never=
 looked back! I agree it may not be optimum for all espresso roasts - as wa=
s mentioned previously if you set to the absolute finest settings the burrs=
 will touch, however it works adequately for the roasts I have tried.
  =
Bottom line: can't be beat for the price/performance.
  
James in So=
uthern CA
----- Original Message ----
From: Justin Marquez 
To: homeroast
Sent: Friday, Decem=
ber 1, 2006 11:04:40 AM
Subject: Re: +Silvia-to PID or not to PID?>>>Neit=
her!
On 12/1/06, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
=
<Snip>
 It looks from his review that the SMP is
an excellent choice for mostly =
drip/press/vac brewing but still quite
useable for espresso just not the =
very best available for finer
grinds.
To my el-cheapo mind, it sound=
s pretty impressive for a $150 grinder
when he says  "That said, after fi=
ne tuning the grinder for a few
days, and going through a lot of coffee (=
about 3 pounds' worth), I was
able to get familiar with the machine's fin=
est grind settings and with
an adjusted tamp, I was producing great espre=
sso shots more often that
not. After a month's solid use, I found that th=
is machine would serve
as a very capable substitute to my Rossi RR45 comm=
ercial grinder."
and then rates it as a "7" against the Rocky in grind qu=
ality.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
=
homeroast mailing list
=http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your pe=
rsonal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http:/=
/sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
 
__==
Want to start your own business?
Learn how on Yahoo! Small Busi=
ness.http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/r-index


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