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Topic: Idido in iRoast trouble (12 msgs / 332 lines)
1) From: Clay Spence
Hi,
When I roast the Idido misty valley in my iRoast 1, it behaves poorly. As
the temperature goes up and the fan slows down, it doesn't push the beans
through very well. Then the roaster surges: it occasionally increases the
fan speed, to full, I think, but very briefly. I think that because the
beans don't circulate well, the temperature rises too high, the machine
senses this and pulses the fan to lower the temperature by moving the air
more. The problem is, the temperature in the chamber (I have a candy
thermometer inserted to one side) rises far more rapidly than with other
beans, and the roast finishes very fast.
I use the 350F-2min., 400F-3min., 450F-to manual stop schedule. I remember
reading that roasting shouldn't proceed too fast. The result has been nice,
but not as outstanding as some here have said. Maybe the roaster doesn't
move them as well because they are denser than most beans. They are, but not
much. The usual two scoops weighed 5.25 ozs., while some other beans weigh 5
ozs. Maybe that and smaller bean size combines causes the problem?
So what to do? Fewer beans? Lower the 450F setting to something else?
Clay

2) From: Kevin
clay,
I had a similar problem with my IR1 when I roasted.  Kit really helped me
out on this one.  I reduced my batch size to 100g - 125g ( and used a very
simple roast curve of 385F for 10 min for a City to city plus (1st crack at
~6min roast stopped at ~8-10min) and 395F (same durations) for a Full City
roast.  This really worked well.  Whenever the temp was set at 400+ the IR
fan would drop  (presumably to reduce airflow to hit this temp) and the
beans would scorch.  I had to keep my roast temps below 400F..
Also, much of the fruity flavor (e.g. blueberry in Harar or IMV) will be
blasted away by the rapid hot airflow in a fluid bed roaster.  Les (I
believe) mentioned this to me.  Supposedly these flavors really come out w/a
drum roaster, though I don't have first hand experience here.  I'm starting
to realize the only way to truly roast great coffee is to master the HGDB
method or use a drum roaster w/complete manual control and roast by look and
smell of the bean.
There are others on this list with much more experience to better explain
this (or correct inaccuracies).  But I hope this helps.
-- 
Kevin

3) From: Vicki Smith
Lower the amount of beans. I always go by weight, and the most I ever 
use is 150 grams. It's just not the pushing around factor, but a smaller 
bean mass will mean a slower roast.
The difference between 150 grams (~5.3 ounces)and 130 grams (~4.6 
ounces) can make a big difference. I go with even smaller roasts in some 
cases (most notably decafs).
The i-roast 2 has a mind of its own for the first 4 minutes or so, and 
each machine has it's own quirks, so I won't comment on your profile.
vicki
Clay Spence wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Vicki Smith
Kevin, I roast using an IR2 and a bread machine/heat gun. My bread 
machine roasts are always better if I am going for fruity flavours.
v
Kevin wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Sandy Andina
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I get some blueberry in my Harar in my i-R2 at 385F for 7-9 min., but  
it really comes to the fore when I use the SC/TO.
On Nov 9, 2006, at 10:46 AM, Kevin wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy
www.sandyandina.com
www.sass-music.com
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I get some blueberry in my Harar =
in my i-R2 at 385F for 7-9 min., but it really comes to the fore when I =
use the SC/TO.
On Nov 9, 2006, at 10:46 AM, Kevin =
wrote:
clay,   I had a similar = problem with my IR1 when I roasted.  Kit really helped me out on = this one.  I reduced my batch size to 100g - 125g ( and used a = very simple roast curve of 385F for 10 min for a City to city plus = (1st crack at ~6min roast stopped at ~8-10min) and 395F (same duration= s) for a Full City roast.  This really worked well.  Whenever the = temp was set at 400+ the IR fan would drop  (presumably to reduce = airflow to hit this temp) and the beans would scorch.  I had to keep = my roast temps below 400F..   Also, much of = the fruity flavor (e.g. blueberry in Harar or IMV) will be blasted = away by the rapid hot airflow in a fluid bed roaster.  Les (I = believe) mentioned this to me.  Supposedly these flavors really come = out w/a drum roaster, though I don't have first hand experience here. = I'm starting to realize the only way to truly roast great coffee is to = master the HGDB method or use a drum roaster w/complete manual control = and roast by look and smell of the bean.   = There are others on this list with much more experience to better = explain this (or correct inaccuracies).  But I hope this helps. = -- Kevin Sandywww.sass-music.com
= = --Apple-Mail-52-105750773--

6) From: Kevin
I really have to make one of those (SCTO)...one of these days...
On 11/9/06, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Kevin

7) From: David Schooley
This bean puts a hurt on my iRoast. A 150 gram batch overheats the  
roaster at 7 minutes and causes it to shut down. I have done two  
roasts of Idido and both did the same thing at the same point in the  
roast. No other bean has shut down my roaster this way, even other  
small beans. The chaff seems to break up into much smaller pieces  
than what I have seen with other beans. I suspect that the small  
pieces of chaff are blocking the air flow more than normal, and the  
combination of reduced air flow and small beans causes the roaster to  
overheat.
The first batch I roasted was excellent. Tomorrow I find out about  
the second batch.
On Nov 9, 2006, at 7:12 AM, Clay Spence wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Larry English
My standard cure for this problem is to reduce batch size, perhaps to 120g,
which is actually a pretty good batch size in general for the iRoast IMHO,
yielding more even roasts.  Haven't tried the Idido yet, and probably won't
use the iRoast for it now, thanks to the warnings - Gene Cafe should handle
it just fine.  Will see ...
Larry
On 11/10/06, David Schooley  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Dave Ehrenkranz
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I roasted 150 g of Idido Misty Valley in my iRoast 2 this morning.  
The result was fantastic. I brewed some immediately after roasting  
and everyone noticed the blueberry. The beans were definitely done  
sooner than when I roasted only 140 grams. Next time I will do down  
to 120 grams and compare.
This bean is great!
dave
On Nov 10, 2006, at 10:07 AM, Larry English wrote:
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I roasted 150 g of Idido Misty =
Valley in my iRoast 2 this morning. The result was fantastic. I brewed =
some immediately after roasting and everyone noticed the blueberry. The =
beans were definitely done sooner than when I roasted only 140 grams. =
Next time I will do down to 120 grams and compare.
This bean is = great!
dave = On Nov 10, 2006, at 10:07 AM, Larry English wrote:My standard cure for this problem is to reduce batch size, = perhaps to 120g, which is actually a pretty good batch size in general = for the iRoast IMHO, yielding more even roasts.  Haven't tried the = Idido yet, and probably won't use the iRoast for it now, thanks to the = warnings - Gene Cafe should handle it just fine.  Will see ... = Larry On 11/10/06, David Schooley <dcschooley> = wrote: This bean puts a hurt on my iRoast. A 150 gram batch overheats = the roaster at 7 minutes and causes it to shut down. I have done = two roasts of Idido and both did the same thing at the same point in = the roast. No other bean has shut down my roaster this way, even = other small beans. The chaff seems to break up into much smaller = pieces than what I have seen with other beans. I suspect that the = small pieces of chaff are blocking the air flow more than normal, and = the combination of reduced air flow and small beans causes the = roaster to overheat. The first batch I roasted was excellent. = Tomorrow I find out about the second batch. On Nov 9, = 2006, at 7:12 AM, Clay Spence wrote: > Hi, > > = When I roast the Idido misty valley in my iRoast 1, it behaves > = poorly. As the temperature goes up and the fan slows down, it > = doesn't push the beans through very well. Then the roaster = surges: > it occasionally increases the fan speed, to full, I = think, but very > briefly. I think that because the beans don't = circulate well, the > temperature rises too high, the machine = senses this and pulses the > fan to lower the temperature by = moving the air more. The problem > is, the temperature in the = chamber (I have a candy thermometer > inserted to one side) rises = far more rapidly than with other beans, > and the roast finishes = very fast. > > I use the 350F-2min., 400F-3min., 450F-to = manual stop schedule. I > remember reading that roasting = shouldn't proceed too fast. The > result has been nice, but not as = outstanding as some here have > said. Maybe the roaster doesn't = move them as well because they are > denser than most beans. They = are, but not much. The usual two > scoops weighed 5.25 ozs., while = some other beans weigh 5 ozs. Maybe > that and smaller bean size = combines causes the problem? > > So what to do? Fewer beans? = Lower the 450F setting to something else? > > = Clay > hom= eroast mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to = http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = = --Apple-Mail-10-195887061--

10) From: Carole Zatz
On 11/10/06, David Schooley  wrote:
<Snip>
I had the very same problem with my iRoast2. It shut down at 7 minutes
(in the middle of a normal 15 minute roast that usually goes to around
12 before I manually hit cool). Never happened before with any other
beans. After the iRoast2 cooled down, I did another roast (of a
different bean) and no problem.
I'll try reducing the batch size. I always do 150g batches ... I'll
lower it to 120g and try this bean again. If that doesn't work then
it's back to the FR8.

11) From: George Birchard
Carole Zatz wrote:
<Snip>
Don't roast it so hot!
The temp setting strongly depends on ambient air temp., but at 20ChF a 
max setting of 435 is high enough.

12) From: David Schooley
The programmed temperature is 415 F when my machine overheats. The  
readout temperature is 423 F, not that I believe that value anyway.  
The thermocouple-in-the-bean-mass temperature is 424-425 degrees when  
the roaster quits. I suspect blocked air flow because the bean  
movement slows down and almost stops right before the machine cuts off.
On Nov 14, 2006, at 3:51 PM, George Birchard wrote:
<Snip>


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